#1
Ok I have a fender hot rod deluxe (40 watts) that I'm really digging.
However, sometimes it really is just too loud.
I could just buy an epi vj combo, but is there a way I can buy the head instead and connect it to the fender?
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Quote by Jestersage
It's stereo amp, and I don't think it's tube. However, for a stereo amp, it is very good. Don't plug guitar into it; just use it as hi-fi if it works.
#2
well it would all depend on how many watts/ohms the VJ cab is. The smaller cab isnt going to make that much of a difference. why not just turn down and crank the hell out of it when noones home
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#3
i have the same problem ish. only my parents truely care lol ihave the same amp its phenomenal but just put the volujme to like 1.5 or x<2 and your set trust me

its a great amp
#4
Seems pretty simple. Turn it down, or buy some headphones, haha.
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#5
Quote by ssguitar
well it would all depend on how many watts/ohms the VJ cab is. The smaller cab isnt going to make that much of a difference. why not just turn down and crank the hell out of it when noones home

That's not what he asking, he wants to know whether he can use his combo amp as a cabinet for an EVJ head.

TS, I think it is possible, but I'm not sure how it works. Hopefully, someone who does know will enter this thread shortly.
#6
Yea, it's a pretty simple wiring job. Wire in a 1/4" jack into the back of the combo, splicing the leads heading to the speakers. Erm, either I or somone else could give more specific instructions if you'd still interested. Jenny?
#7
^^ oops my bad i read it wrong. i thought he was gonna buy a VJ cab and run his deluxe through it
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#8
I know that my peavey classic 50 can do that.
You just unplug the 1/4" jack from the speaker output on the amp, then just run the EVJ through the speakers.
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#9
someone call?

anyhoo, yeah you are going to unplug the hotrod. you dont leave it plugged in when you are just using its speakers.

you unplug the wires to the speakers.


you would need to mark them. because this is just a sometimes thing.

so you might have to plug them back in whenever you want to use the HRD or i guess install a switch. but god forbid you ever forget to switch on the HRDs speakers when using the amp, or u'd blow the amp.

ok so you would unplug those speakers and attach thick speaker wire with quick disconnect clips on one end and a 1/4" jack on the other.



you would match the ohms and connect from the correct ohm output into the jack using a speaker cable.
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#10
Quote by Miggy01
Ok I have a fender hot rod deluxe (40 watts) that I'm really digging.
However, sometimes it really is just too loud.
I could just buy an epi vj combo, but is there a way I can buy the head instead and connect it to the fender?

As said, just play it quiter when people are home and crank the hell out of it when the house is empty. Or do you have a brick shed? If so, play it out there and set up mattresses in front of the door and make some window plugs for the windows(easy to do, i made some and they work very well).

But yes, its easy to run another amp into a combo, just unhook the amp wires going to the speakers in your fender and wire a 1/4" input jack to it. And make sure you match Ohms.
#11
Quote by DeadMansCurve
As said, just play it quiter when people are home and crank the hell out of it when the house is empty. Or do you have a brick shed? If so, play it out there and set up mattresses in front of the door and make some window plugs for the windows(easy to do, i made some and they work very well).

But yes, its easy to run another amp into a combo, just unhook the amp wires going to the speakers in your fender and wire a 1/4" input jack to it. And make sure you match Ohms.

I crank it as often as possible, I was just looking for alternatives.
I think I'll just buy a small combo (5w) so I can have the option of moving it around the house, as the 50ish pound HRD is kinda awkward to haul up and down the steps.
Quote by Chikitty_China
Good lord. You are amazing.



Quote by Jestersage
It's stereo amp, and I don't think it's tube. However, for a stereo amp, it is very good. Don't plug guitar into it; just use it as hi-fi if it works.
#13
Now we know why they make small much more portable and neighbor/parent friendly practice amps.
#14
Quote by Miggy01
I crank it as often as possible, I was just looking for alternatives.
I think I'll just buy a small combo (5w) so I can have the option of moving it around the house, as the 50ish pound HRD is kinda awkward to haul up and down the steps.

Yeah, i think that buying a small combo might be better. Try the Laney VC15 or VC30, theyre meant to be really good.
#15
Overcomplicating things...

The Fender should have a speaker cable plugged into the back of the amp, most Fender combos do. It should have around 6" to a foot extra. Make sure it's the same impedance as the head you wish to use. (8 ohms according to the Fender Amp Field Guide). Plug the amp's speaker cable into the speaker out jack of the head. Make sure you swap it back before using the combo.

If your amp does not have a speaker cable going to an output jack, I would make up a patch cord, guitar jack on one end, two spade connectors on the other. Don't even think about leaving an open jack in there like the one pictured above, that's an open invitation to a shorted speaker cable or a possible shock. (This is not to imply that Jenny's info is incorrect, just don't leave a jack uncovered like that, lying around loose inside the cabinet.) Use a standard 1/4" guitar jack on one end, spade plugs on the other connected directly to the speaker tabs. You'll only need about 2-3 feet of good speaker cable. DO NOT use guitar cable, two strand speaker cable only. This is how I run my Fender Champ through two of the 10" speakers in my Super Reverb or to any combo amp's speakers. I can't use all 4, that makes it 2 ohm, very bad for a 4 ohm amp. Watch the speaker polarity, the wires on the Fender should be color coded, wrap a short strip of red electrical tape on the + wire to be sure you have it right. The + terminal on the speaker is usually marked + on newer speakers, and with a red dot on older ones.

I would avoid altering the amp wiring at all, and in most cases you'll be able to unplug only one wire, most newer speakers have dual contact clips to facilitate easier wiring with multiple speakers. The main thing is to disconnect the internal speaker of the combo from the amp. Only one wire does the trick, then polarity is not an issue, the other wire is still in its original place, you can only screw it up if you're brain dead...or smokin really good stuff...

It would be possible, and not all that difficult, to add a jack so you could use a regular speaker cable, use the shutoff type with a spring tab that shuts off the internal wiring and goes only to the speaker when plugged in. That would work fine but takes a bit more work and I would have to sort out just how. I've done them the other way, as a speaker out jack to use a different speaker with a combo amp, especially with cheesy sounding practice amps. Being able to plug into an external cabinet with a couple of 12's makes a huge difference compared to the internal 8 incher, but I haven't tried to set one up to isolate the speakers from their own amp.

At any rate, be very careful however you do it. A blown speaker is not cheap, and if you don't do it right a blown amp is much more expensive.

I would just turn it way down, my 45 watt Super Reverb sounds just fabulous at only 2 to 3 on the volume knob, and is much quieter than my Fender Champ cranked to 10, and the Champ sounds good at low volume too. I run both at home all the time and they sound great even low enough you can't hear it in the other end of the house. If I want distortion or whatever that's what I have a pedalboard for. I've also used my 120 watt Peavey MX as a practice amp lots of times, I just keep the volume knob way low, it still sounds very good through a 2x12 cab.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#16
Quote by Revalk
Seems pretty simple. Turn it down, or buy some headphones, haha.


Most tube amps don't have headphone outs.

The VJ should have taps for 4, 8 and 16 ohm anyways.

The reason the Hot Rod is so loud is because it's log pot used for the volume knob. Change it out with a linear pot, and you'll have more volume control. The log pot sends you to pretty much full volume at 3.
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