#1
How do I play a flat major chord or a sharp diminished chord.
Because in the lydian mode chord progression you have to sharp the 4 chord which is diminished and in Aeolian chord progression you have to flat the 3 chord which is a major. which notes do you flatten? My brains a little rattled so this is just confusing me.
#3
i'm fairly sure you don't flatten anything in the major chord on the b3 of the aeolian.

my understanding is that it's just a major chord, the fact that it's on the b3 of the scale doesn't mean it has to be a minor chord. look at G major scale, the third is a major 3rd but it's a minor chord.

if you flatten anything in a major chord, it's not a major chord anymore. same goes for diminished chords or any chord for that matter. just say you have an A minor, 1 b3 5. sharpening the b3 to a 3 will make it major, hence no longer minor.

you don't alter the actual chord notes because it's on the 3rd, 4th, 5th, or whatever of a scale, for example you don't sharpen the dminished chord because it's on the 4th.

well, that's my understanding of it anyway, i could be wrong though.
#4
Quote by Metallica rulz
How do I play a flat major chord or a sharp diminished chord.
Because in the lydian mode chord progression you have to sharp the 4 chord which is diminished and in Aeolian chord progression you have to flat the 3 chord which is a major. which notes do you flatten? My brains a little rattled so this is just confusing me.

A Bb major chord is a major chord built from Bb. Say in G minor you have a bIII chord, that would be Bb.

With D lydian, the #ivdim chord would be G#dim
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Quote by Owned
i'm fairly sure you don't flatten anything in the major chord on the b3 of the aeolian.

my understanding is that it's just a major chord, the fact that it's on the b3 of the scale doesn't mean it has to be a minor chord. look at G major scale, the third is a major 3rd but it's a minor chord.

if you flatten anything in a major chord, it's not a major chord anymore. same goes for diminished chords or any chord for that matter. just say you have an A minor, 1 b3 5. sharpening the b3 to a 3 will make it major, hence no longer minor.

you don't alter the actual chord notes because it's on the 3rd, 4th, 5th, or whatever of a scale, for example you don't sharpen the dminished chord because it's on the 4th.

well, that's my understanding of it anyway, i could be wrong though.


Well see the lesson the guy sent me above? thats the one I just read through and here is what it said.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Aeolian Minor Diminished Major Minor Minor Major Major


Changes to:

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Aeolian Minor Diminished Flat-Major Minor Minor Flat-Major Flat-Major

see how they flats the 3 chord which is the major chord.
Also this one.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 - Intervals
Lydian Major Major Minor Diminished Major Minor Minor
to
1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 - Intervals
Lydian Major Major Minor Sharp-Diminished Major Minor Minor
there he sharped the diminished chord.
Edit-Thanks prime.
#6
Yeah I don't like that part of that lesson.

F lydian is F G A B C D E. The #4 is B, so the #vidim is Bdim.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
dude the only reason they say b3 or sharp four, is when you're working from the ionian mode which has no#or b's. it's just to get the modes for your next mode. i.e

E ionian
E(1) F#(2) G#(3) A(4) B(5) C#(6) D#(7)

now to get E Lydian sharpen the 4th

E Lydian

E(1) F#(2) G#(3) A#(4) B(5) C#(6) D#(7)

so the formulas are there for you to use on the ionian mode to get other modes