#1
Would it be possible to wire a mini switch into a guitar without a tone knob to act as a tone control? Like you would either have tone all the way up, tone all the way down, or if there's a third position like tone at 5 or something. If it is possible could someone show me a diagram?
#2
...how many times do you use your tone knob? how many times does any one use their tone knob? sorry if that's off topic but....A TONE KNOB? it's kinda like having 3 arms, but can only use 2.
...
#3
I adjust my tone and volume knobs constantly while I play with my pinky

which I why I always rewire anything I own to have a master tone & volume


If you just leave them both on 10 you're missing out on soooo much tonal subtlety available to you
#4
Quote by Ghold125
...how many times do you use your tone knob? how many times does any one use their tone knob? sorry if that's off topic but....A TONE KNOB? it's kinda like having 3 arms, but can only use 2.


I use it a lot on my Les Paul actually and now I'm kind of regretting omitting one from the Ibanez I'm slowly working on, but I'm pretty sure I won't have the room in the cavity to stick another pot in there (and 3 knobs might look bad) so a mini switch would be the best solution.

I really reccomend you try using yours, if there's no sound change then there's something wrong with your guitar (or your ears ). It wouldn't be on there if it was completely useless...
#5
Quote by JD Red LP
Would it be possible to wire a mini switch into a guitar without a tone knob to act as a tone control? Like you would either have tone all the way up, tone all the way down, or if there's a third position like tone at 5 or something. If it is possible could someone show me a diagram?
It sounds pretty easy. You'll need either a SPST on-off minitoggle (the cheapest, simplest switch) if you just want the tone cut on or off.

If you use a SPDT on-off-on, you can have "tone on 0" / "tone on 10" / "tone on 5"

You need to be specific about the guitar you're using this on, and the present wiring.

Supply the diagram and we can modify it to show the switch and cap
(and resistor for the "tone on 5")
Meadows
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#6
well...you could do

|   |   |
1   2   3

1- no resistor, direct to out
2 - where the wire comes from
3 - 250k (or 500k for single coil) resistor to out

which would equal 0 and 10 on the tone pot

Whodicted



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#8
Quote by JD Red LP
I use it a lot on my Les Paul actually and now I'm kind of regretting omitting one from the Ibanez I'm slowly working on, but I'm pretty sure I won't have the room in the cavity to stick another pot in there (and 3 knobs might look bad) so a mini switch would be the best solution.

I really reccomend you try using yours, if there's no sound change then there's something wrong with your guitar (or your ears ). It wouldn't be on there if it was completely useless...


lol, my tone knob does work, i just never have a real need to want to change it, play mostly metal/heavy metal, so for me i like to have some "bite" to my sound.
...
#9
The only way I can think of is to get a DPDT on/on/on type switch. like the one Here under the DPDT section, diagram D.

you could make the resistor half of whatever your pots are now if you want the 5 value to sound the same as on your guitar now.



The wire coming from the middle right lug is coming from the volume pot, just like in a tone pot. Forgot to label it
#10
Quote by Ryzekiel
The only way I can think of is to get a DPDT on/on/on type switch. like the one Here under the DPDT section, diagram D.
Hi Ryzekiel,

Nice drawing, nice initiative.
I've seen Wolf's site before (1728.com) I gotta give that guy props.

There is another way. Using a SPDT on/off/on, the resistor goes between the two throws. The cap connects to one of them. That puts the "tone on 10" position in the center. That's not as intuitive to use, but saves on the cost of the switch ($5 instead of $10) A few years ago, the on/on/on were difficult to find, but diMarzio is repackaging and distributing them. They're very easy to get, these days. For most people, they'll pay the extra $10 and do it the way you showed.
Quote by Ryzekiel
you could make the resistor half of whatever your pots are now if you want the 5 value to sound the same as on your guitar now.
Make that about 10% of whatever your pots are now to get the same value as "5" on the knob. The pots are log taper. Half the resistance happens around 8.5 on the knob.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#12
Definitely cleaner, but the sequence isn't the same.

Half the people who would do this would prefer invest the extra cost and effort of doing it your way. You only wire it once. But you use the thing for years. Having the selections in sequence is very important to some people.

It's always nice to have choices.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#14
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Make that about 10% of whatever your pots are now to get the same value as "5" on the knob. The pots are log taper. Half the resistance happens around 8.5 on the knob.

Actually, the pot reaches about 75% of it's total value at 5 (if you're talking about an A-curve pot), so the resistor should be about 75% of the pot value.