#1
I have a 20year-old (at least) Dod octave pedal that works better than anything I've tried recently, EXCEPT... it doesn't cope with the output from my active basses.

Two questions:

1) does anyone happen to know if it'll cope with a higher supply voltage than the standard 9V?

2) any good octave pedals around these days?
#2
I have the same one, I know what you mean. I use the distortion in the lower octave; the slight breakup sounds quite 'soft' to me. Each to their own tho!
I wouldn't run a DOD with more than 9v, they're not well built enough to even risk it.

The Boss OC-2 will octave basses equally as well as guitars, and doesn't cost the earth. The new E-H MicroPOG looks tasty, but I can't vouch for its' tonal quality or cost. It is an E-H tho!
Bass specific ones from EBS, Ashdown and MXR can be pricey, but they're all good.
#5
Quote by creepingjesus73
Go America! Can't get them here that cheap. And I'm a 6 hour drive from the factory...

I hate this thing. And salaries here are low (and the prices high)...
Dingwall Afterburner I 5 string
Warwick Blue Cab 30 practice amp
Quote by thefitz
But hold on - you're debating on whether or not to buy a bass or keep your house? That's pretty fucking hardcore!
#6
Hey thanks for the reply.

"the slight breakup sounds quite 'soft' to me. Each to their own tho" - it's a big crackly flappy-buttocks farting noise I'm getting, no no I mean the bass sound - "slight breakup" would have been great. It's as if the battery's had it, but I'm using it on external power. I wonder if it might be that the pedal's so old and some components have had it. Electrolytic capacitors can wear out sometimes. In which case just finding another one the same would be fine, I've got no complaints other than the breaking up.

"The new E-H MicroPOG ... It is an E-H tho"

Do you mean "It is an E-H tho" as being good or bad? I have a couple of EH pedals and they're ok - a fave that keeps getting borrowed but I refuse to sell is an old 70s Small Stone, still going totally beautiful. Very noisy though - I've used just the noise off it as a sort of Jean-Michel-Jarre type wind'n'waves effect on an album. Also got a nano bassballs that seems fine but a bit lo-fi. My thoughts on the EH multiplexer are that even with guitar demos on the EH website it doesn't track totally reliably, so I don't hold out much hope it'll handle a bass. Don't know if the Pog'll have the same problem.

Might as well mention that I bought a Behringer Bass V amp, and that didn't track at all - I mean not at all, it came out with a sound more like a bog flushing than a discernible pitch. I then tried a Line 6 pod and that was similar though fractionally not so awful. So my usual "oh it'll be good enough for me" apparently doesn't apply to octave devices.

Might have to trawl some shops and try some out - meanwhile got a Behringer to tide me over, well, for £16 it'll either work or it won't...

Anyway, thanks for the recommendations!
#7
I took so long replying that you guys snuck in first - the Ashdown looks pretty serious but too big to fit on a modest pedal board. I need the thing to be the standard minimum size, like most Boss pedals or similar.

Thanks for the replies.
#8
http://www.bassplayer.com/article/octavers/Dec-06/24674

There's a link with pictures, reviews, and sound clips of pretty much every octaver available at the moment.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#9
Lol Raph, I get what you mean about the sound. That sounds pretty goosed! Mind you there's not much inside the average old DOD, so they're easier to fix. Soz, I didn't make it clear, I'm an E-H fan. The fact that so many original ones are still going strong speaks volumes for them. Not always 'conventional' or 'clinically perfect', but usually fun.

J-MJ doesn't get mentioned in these parts much! Wonderful composer.
#10
"'clinically perfect'"

Haha - clinically perfect is for lab techies with white coats and big brains. Musicians need the finest dark murky filth and lots of it. The only time it's too murky for me is the bassballs when I'm still playing basslines, it loses quite a bit of poke out of the sound, whereas for example the moogerfooger keeps the full thumpiness and just adds lovely filth. I play 5-string basses so if I want to sound low I just play low, and the point of the octave is to sound crungy and dirty so a bit of less-than perfect tone is ok! The two things I want to avoid though are "yodelling" and huge farty breaking up that obviously isn't just nice filth.

Thanks for that link - the Boss and EBS look the most likely contenders.

I'll see how bad this Behringer is when it arrives...