#1
im just wondering of you need to know poth of them?

in a lesson here on UG it stands that you are either a spets person or a intervals person, but other sitest don't, so do you NEED to know both of them?
#3
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#4
-I don't understand your question.

Do you need to know both of them?

Steps and intervalls are probably the simplest of theory and it's to easy to not to learn them.
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#5
you should know both, or at least understand both, but in usage you'll probably prefer one or the other. I personally use intervals exclusively, much clearer IMHO.
#6
Quote by grille
I'm just wondering if you need to know both of them? In a lesson here on UG it states that you are either a steps person or an intervals person, but other sites don't, so do you NEED to know both of them?
Yes, you need to understand both concepts. You could understand, describe, construct and deconstruct scales using the vocabulary of intervals, but it's much more clear and straightforward to use steps and half-steps.

On the other hand, I suppose you could drill into chord and progression theory using only the step and half-step terms, but using intervals is much more clear and straightforward. As I think about it, though, it doesn't seem possible to explore theory using only steps and half-steps. Perhaps you could, but why go to all that trouble? Intervalic terms are the way to go with theory.
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#7
You could understand, describe, construct and deconstruct scales using the vocabulary of intervals, but it's much more clear and straightforward to use steps and half-steps.


I disagree. Understanding, Describing, and Deconstructing are much easier with intervals. The only thing steps lend themselves towards are building modes of scales. Beyond that I don't see any advantages and many disadvantages(if I see a +4 I know there's a tritone. If I see a W I have no clue what's going on.)
#8
Quote by capiCrimm
I disagree. Understanding, describing, and deconstructing (scales) are much easier with intervals. The only thing steps lend themselves towards are building modes of scales. Beyond that I don't see any advantages and many disadvantages(if I see a +4 I know there's a tritone. If I see a W I have no clue what's going on.)
Reasonable people can certainly disagree on this point, but my teaching experience (30+ years) leads me to believe that using intervals to teach scale (and mode) construction and usage is counter-productive. In short, it confuses the student. But thanks for adding a different viewpoint.
All the best,
gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#10
I would personally start with steps.
Intervals are also, of course, just as necessary. But steps seem to be more easily grasped for me.
But once grasped (and even better, once audibly recognizable) intervals have a tendency to take over. I know, at the very least, that saying "a perfect fourth" is easier to me than counting "five semitones" or "two and a half steps."
#11
Another argument for using steps as opposed to intervals in teaching major scales is that steps seem (at least to me) to lend themselves more easily to the teaching of tetrachords, which leads naturally into the study of the Circle of Fifths.
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- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#12
I'd say it's pretty necessary. It's really helpful when talking music with other musicians.
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#13
Quote by gpb0216
Another argument for using steps as opposed to intervals in teaching major scales is that steps seem (at least to me) to lend themselves more easily to the teaching of tetrachords, which leads naturally into the study of the Circle of Fifths.


but it seems its better to know intervals to learn the CO5

i think

that is why im having som touble to learn the CO5