#1
That the guitar has the abilities of an entire orchestra in itself. This was emblazoned as the headline of a method book I learned from in this conservatory as a child. in How many ways do you think this is true? By the way, as far as I know, beethoven never composed for the guitar. Does anyone know otherwise?

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#2
What period was beethoven, was it late 1700's -early 1800's, it didnt even occure to me that he would have been around when guitars were invented
#3
Quote by GuitarGuitar
What period was beethoven, was it late 1700's -early 1800's, it didnt even occure to me that he would have been around when guitars were invented

Actually i think guitars have been around since then.
#4
Quote by LaGrange
Actually i think guitars have been around since then.

you mean before then or after??
#5
It really depends. You can play some amazing stuff if you use the potential of the guitar to its fullest. I love it when people fingerpick and make it sound like two people are playing instead of one. On the other hand, an orchestra has so many different sounds and tones, all combined into one harmony, not to mention the drums.

This really depends on how you look at it. Here's an example using paintball: some people can own the field all by themselves, but they will never replace a well-organized team. They can, however, be a part of an organized team and completely mow faces.


So guitars are great instruments with tons of potential, but they will never have the potential of an entire band.
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#6
Well, that would mean that the guitar is able to produce brass, woodwinds, strings and all the other types of sounds simultaniously. Well, you'll have to make compromises.
^ seconded.

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#7
Spanish-style guitars and instruments similar to the guitar (such as the Lute) have been around since medieval times... So he may well have said it.

Many composers used guitars quite heavily if they were on the road a lot as it's much easier to drag a guitar along vs. a piano.

Now the dreadnought style guitar as we know it I'm pretty sure didn't come around until the 1800s, but still...
#8
Wikipedia: The modern guitar is descended from the Roman cithara brought by the Romans to Hispania around 40 AD, and further adapted and developed with the arrival of the four-string oud, brought by the Moors after their invasion of the Iberian peninsula during the 8th century AD

So it was definetly around before Beethoven was alive, although it was obviously different than the classical ones that exist today.
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#9
i suppose i should answer you quest seeing as i made my own -
I think pianos are the strongest instrument as the can play anything from simple mellody to continues streams of polyphony and guitars can realy compare, mind you i love the guitar and it will probably allways be my strongest instrument but they can only play 2 lines max and thats without out chords
#10
Quote by RadioMuse

Now the dreadnought style guitar as we know it I'm pretty sure didn't come around until the 1800s, but still...

wasnt beethoven around then?
#11
Quote by philipp122
So guitars are great instruments with tons of potential, but they will never have the potential of an entire band.


I disagree, guitars can produce percussion (well any instrument can), bass and treble sounds, so you've got it all covered really
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#12
Beethoven: 1770-1827

Guitar(guitarra latina- most similar to today): 1200-

So yes guitar was around in Beethovens time

It was kinda invented 40AD, but it evolved to the masterpiece which it is today


EDIT: damn, beaten to the wiki search :P
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#13
i think the ideal is that you can cover a lot of range on simply a guitar. i've seen orchestrated pieces arranged for guitar, obviously you're not going to have the sustain of a bowed instrument (which with an even stroke can drag a note out indefinately) or the timbre of a wind instrument, but as i said before, alot of orchestra music can definately be arranged for it, the only instrument that i think comes close in being able to do so much with so little is the piano (ideally a good tapper can use all 10 fingers and effectively reproduce piano like sounds)
#15
^ they have special midi controllers and pickups that can make a guitar sound like d@mn near anything (cello, violin,horns, entire orchestras even) Roland makes them and guitar center sells them.
#16
Quote by z4twenny
Roland makes them and guitar center sells them.


-You'll probably get a discount once they notice this.
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#17
^ lmao, thats good, have you seen the price tag on the d@mn things!?!?!?! i'll stick with VSTi/VST thanks! (besides i can piano roll music that i could never ever play on guitar)
#18
I think the guitar is kind of overrated, and it could never compare to a full orchestra. Orchestra's are concerned with unamplified acoustic instruments, and you rarely would ever see a guitar in one in the first place. Don't get me wrong, the guitar is a cool instrument, but much of that comes from how developed it is compared to other instruments (electric). Acoustically... piano seems to me a cooler instrument.
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#20
^ and like someone else said, try hauling around a baby grand with you everywhere. and actually now, lots of concerts are mic'ed and amplified. moreso i think for the purposes of filling a massive concert hall with sound and recording. but its still amplified
#21
First off, I'm sure beethoven didn't mean the electric guitar. I suppose to weed out all the MIDI french horn effects arguments, I'm going to have to limit my intended question/area of discussion to the classical guitar. Beethoven was around around the time that guitars assumed their modern form, so It may well be that he said it. I have personally witnessed an amazing classical guitarist fill a hall as majestically as an orchestra and prove this statement true to me. The thing about the guitar is that it is capable of so much on its own, similar to a piano, yet is also capable of a much more tonal variation than a piano. The guitarist i saw made his instrument sound just like a harp at times, then like a march of percussion and horns, and he even managed to make some parts have the airiness, fluff, and grace of a string section. He really proved it to me. A well rounded classical guitar repertoire can very well sound like an orchestra and was probably intended to. Share your opinions people.

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#22
i think the guitar had 8 strings back then. and i think a piano is better then guitar with solo arrangements.
#23
Quote by affinity_strat
That the guitar has the abilities of an entire orchestra in itself. This was emblazoned as the headline of a method book I learned from in this conservatory as a child. in How many ways do you think this is true? By the way, as far as I know, beethoven never composed for the guitar. Does anyone know otherwise?


well if you think of it, it can play chords like a piano or many instruments playing at once, or you can play chords/bass lines with melodies like a piano or a combo of instruments, it can play single note melodies like any instrument, and you can add a percussive effect to the playing as well. the guitar is able to pull off a lot of things. its a pretty versitile instrument. its pretty much the piano of hand held instruments with added features like bending, virbrato, harmonics.