#1
Title says it all. I know that there are other methods of playing besides boxed positions, but I don't know where to look or what to look up. Does anyone know a source that would educate me on such matters?
#2
start playing the scales on one string, then adding in strings, playing vertically along the neck.
Connect your boxes together, and right down some diagrams (i know they still seem like boxes, but it's a start out of them) and tabs that run through multiple box patterns. Or you could play them in interval patterns

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/147
good article
#3
Learn so many boxes that they connect.

It worked well for me.
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#4
^ i disagree with this and say learn entire scales all the way up and down the neck. even if you learn multiple box positions its still gonna sound like yer playing in a box scale and using that position isn't gonna work over every chord progression you come across (well it MIGHT, but chances are most of the time you can go outside the box patterns and find something that sounds WAY better)
#6
^ i disagree with this and say learn entire scales all the way up and down the neck. even if you learn multiple box positions its still gonna sound like yer playing in a box scale and using that position isn't gonna work over every chord progression you come across (well it MIGHT, but chances are most of the time you can go outside the box patterns and find something that sounds WAY better)


that's basically what you're doing. The point of "breaking the box" is to allow for more reach on the fretboard. So you can increase the range of the guitar. In a box you'll have at most 2 octaves, but over the board you have three octaves. Also so you can find the easiest fingering. In one box you'll have to jump a string and go up three frets to hit a fifth, but in the box under it all you have to do is play the next string two frets down(i.e. a power chord).

If you want to "break break" the box. Then you don't want a scale, but to learn intervals from root and relative notes. Once you've sufficiently done that the "scale" is no longer a sequence of notes, but a set of intervals you can play. A new scale is a new set of intervals, normally just one or two of them changed or missing. However, I still recommend the traditional boxes, but at the same time noting the intervals you're playing.

Look up the Hopscotch method for a simple way to break the box. Also "sweep", "speed", "diagonal" or "3note per string" patterns will help you out.

Meh, but I don't know that much besides what worked for me, so try everything you hear.
#7
Quote by Nicoles
Your asking the same question as this guy so rather than repeat i shall just give the link -> https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=719137

basically learn all the shapes of a scale, just not the first box (shape)



Ah, thanks! That just cleared up a whole battlefield for me!
#8
Stop using the boxes, and stop using shapes. Instead concentrate on the notes themselves....look at the note you're playing and see which other notes in the scale you can navigate to.
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