#1
Hey guys, Im thinking about my potential new bass (Tune TWB43), and it has active pickups. I was wondering if the active nature would make the sound too bright for walking bass lines and other jazz and blues stuff. Is there anything i can do about it?

Thanks
#2
theres a cort bass that switches from active to passive that would be perfect for anything. check it out.
#3
Well, what you vould do is cut your treble and boost your mids to darken the tone up a little bit. A few blues players use active pickups like the Bassist that's with BB King. He has an Ibanez Soundgear with EMG's in it.
The clock strikes midnight
When tomorrow and today collide
The moon is at its highest
And the twilight seems fitting
For in these moments
The light at the end of the world
Shines like a thousand suns....


Victor Gutierrez
#4
^You actually do not want to boost the mids at all. Cut the mids if anything. To be more specific, cut the higher mids and leave the low mids slightly boosted or flat. Other than mids, leave the treble flat, and boost the bass (as long as it's not too low, somewhere around 80Hz would be perfect) slightly. You want to keep the EQ fairly flat to keep the tone as natural as possible. The next step is to play %80 or more on the neck pickup. That should give you a warm natural tone, as close to an upright as is possible with those hot pickups. Just out of curiosity what bass do you have?
#6
That's what I was afraid of; they're not single coils, they seem to be some kind of soapbar or humbucker. You won't get the a real smooth sound out of it. I've never played one though so I can't really judge. If you are a heavy jazz, blues, country, gospel, light R&B gigger this may not be the bass for you. However, if you're mainly a rock guy, and only play jazz on the side you'll probably like it. Again, it's up to preference. I've seen jazz guys make sweet, sweet lovin' music on a Schecter, and heavy metalers rock out on a jazz bass. It's up to you.
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
^You actually do not want to boost the mids at all. Cut the mids if anything. To be more specific, cut the higher mids and leave the low mids slightly boosted or flat. Other than mids, leave the treble flat, and boost the bass (as long as it's not too low, somewhere around 80Hz would be perfect) slightly. You want to keep the EQ fairly flat to keep the tone as natural as possible. The next step is to play %80 or more on the neck pickup. That should give you a warm natural tone, as close to an upright as is possible with those hot pickups. Just out of curiosity what bass do you have?


i can't be perfectly sure that that would work for that bass, but i do pretty much the same thing with my schecter (which has an active pre-amp) and it gives a great jazz tone, so if you do end up getting that bass and want a jazz nice jazz sound, then def. follow jazz's advice


the only thing that i do differently i use the neck pick up exclusively, no bridge
#11
Perhaps he doesnt like the feel of the fenders. I really like the tone of an active J bass but I feel really akward playing most fenders, J or P, not really sure why.

I tend to steer away from fender myself.
#12
thanks dmntr, thats how i feel. The fender jazz felt a bit thick and awkward when i was trying it out. As for that, any recommendations?
#13
Quote by bassburton
Well, what you vould do is cut your treble and boost your mids to darken the tone up a little bit. A few blues players use active pickups like the Bassist that's with BB King. He has an Ibanez Soundgear with EMG's in it.


Hmmm, I saw them a couple of months ago and he was using a red Yamaha 5 string.
Quote by DieGarbageMan
can i get a tl;dr up in this bitch?

A mod makes a joke and hi-jacks a thread...

Quote by paintITblack39
usually, this is often discussed in the political threads ...

let's change the question: are you pro or antti niemi?