#1
Hello, i'm currently in the process of recording my first song ever, & i was wondering if the different parts of the song should be recorded in parts.

EG: --- record intro, verse, pre-chorus, chorus, bridge ALL separately (for guitars/vocals/bass/drums)

----OR----

Should the recording be, like, the entire song recorded in one go?
#4
are you just using a mic and then playing everything or are you using a mixer/interface or anything?
#5
Quote by Blazn Blue
are you just using a mic and then playing everything or are you using a mixer/interface or anything?

I can do both.

I can choose to record the entire song at one go,
----OR----
Record the song in parts.

what's the standard practice for recordings?
as in, are you supposed to record it in one go, or in parts?
#6
well if you have the technology, usually what i do is this. first plug all guitars into the mixer and then play the song through with everyone on the band playing. (i directly record the guitars in the mix as opposed to micing the amps), then i have a drummer play while listening to the guitars and i record that. then i'll have the singer listen to the whole mix and record the vocals. then once i have all that recorded i'll go back and if i need to put anything else in i will.

you can choose whether you want to record everyone playing together, or record everyone seperately. obviously, everyone playing together is the easiest but you will usually not have have enough inputs for your computer to properly mic everything to its fullest potential. recording people seperately is good because it adds depth to each instrument, and overall is a better quality song.

YES you should record the complete song in one go. It is an incredible bitch to record parts and sequence it together.
#7
Quote by Blazn Blue
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YES you should record the complete song in one go. It is an incredible bitch to record parts and sequence it together.

sure, thanks.

Anyone with a different point of view?
#8
It's helpful to record the whole song through once, and use that as a guide track. Then you can do whatever the hell you want. You can keep on trying to do the whole song perfectly in one take, or you can use the guide track to tell you where you are and then re-record different sections to perfection. Recording the different sections seperately doesn't mean that you have to painstakingly put it all together in the end. If you know what you're doing, you can often achieve much better results by recording the different sections seperately.
#11
Get the drums down in a single take if possible (mostly because editing multi-mic drums recordings is a bit hard on smaller systems) and then layer everything on top of that. Most drummers aren't too keen on recording all by their lonesome though so make sure that one person in the band, preferably the guitarist, plays along with a DI to get all the parts in the right place. If possible use a click track. That way you can record the guitars/bass/vocals in any way you want. If, for example, the guitarist feels that he can't focus for an entire song (which would make him a total wuss) then he can record each section separately because there's still the drum track as a guide.

So the way most people would record a song would be as a mix between full takes and separately recorded sections.
#13
Any song has parts that repeat and in my opinion it sounds more homogeneous (and better) if the similar parts are really exactly the same. So record that part and then use it in other parts of the song as needed.
Bottom line, I think it is overall easier to record parts.
#14
Agreed on the drums though. It is better to record drums in a single take then lay down different parts of the songs.


Quote by ebon00
Get the drums down in a single take if possible (mostly because editing multi-mic drums recordings is a bit hard on smaller systems) and then layer everything on top of that. Most drummers aren't too keen on recording all by their lonesome though so make sure that one person in the band, preferably the guitarist, plays along with a DI to get all the parts in the right place. If possible use a click track. That way you can record the guitars/bass/vocals in any way you want. If, for example, the guitarist feels that he can't focus for an entire song (which would make him a total wuss) then he can record each section separately because there's still the drum track as a guide.

So the way most people would record a song would be as a mix between full takes and separately recorded sections.
#15
Quote by metallhead
Any song has parts that repeat and in my opinion it sounds more homogeneous (and better) if the similar parts are really exactly the same. So record that part and then use it in other parts of the song as needed.
Bottom line, I think it is overall easier to record parts.

yeah i agree that the identical parts of the song shd be recorded once then repeated.
#16
Quote by paulefty
sure, thanks.

Anyone with a different point of view?



Unless you piece it together very well, then it might end up sounding like you took a bunch of random recorded tidbits and pieced them together, plus its more organic to just record it straight through.
#17
Quote by metallhead
Any song has parts that repeat and in my opinion it sounds more homogeneous (and better) if the similar parts are really exactly the same. So record that part and then use it in other parts of the song as needed.
Bottom line, I think it is overall easier to record parts.


But that makes it a necessity to use a click track and not all drummers can play to one. And even programmed parts sound better (read "more natural") when there's some tempo variation going on. I've done this myself, I was an engineer on an album where the drums were almost the last thing to be added, and although it is bordering on a perfect album performance-wise it's a bit too much at times.
#18
Quote by FreeManson15
Unless you piece it together very well, then it might end up sounding like you took a bunch of random recorded tidbits and pieced them together, plus its more organic to just record it straight through.


That's true. What you could also do, is just record the rythm guitar and the drums together first. Then add the lead guitar where it's needed, and the vocals....and any other extras
If we are all god's children, what makes Jesus so damn special?
#19
Quote by TheNERD250
That's true. What you could also do, is just record the rythm guitar and the drums together first. Then add the lead guitar where it's needed, and the vocals....and any other extras

yeah, that's how i'd do it.