#1
So my band has decided to start writing some original stuff.. Riff heavy, full o' double kick, shreading solos and hopefully intresting and exciting bass.

Now we're a three peice so I gotta fill out the sound and I got a bit of freedom

1. What are some ways to make metal bass intresting..like...not just pounding roots along with the kick or following the guitar.

2. What are some ways to fill out the sound to make up for lack of guitar..I was thinking some distortion but I d'no..

Thanks friends!
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#2
Distortion or overdrive would be a good idea when it coems to filling your sound.

Also, to make it interesting play a scale descending or ascending, dpending n where the next chord is. Otherwise, don't variate too much from roots or 5ths. Metal isn't really a bass heavy genre, so if you try to put too much into it, I don't think it would sound right. However, that's ultimately a decision you should make.

There's no shame in playing roots FWIW.

EDIT: I like your choice of bass btw
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Last edited by Funkbass796 at Nov 24, 2007,
#3
I'd suggest listening to Pantera for some ideas, as Rex is the king of metal bass.

Also, check out the lessons page, and read the Beginner Bass lessons, they're all about playing other than the root note, and are very helpful.

Sometimes with metal though, the best thing for the song is to play the riff with the guitar. Not root notes, but the whole glorious fiddly metal riff. Really sounds cool sometimes.
#4
Fuzz, Distortion, alot of effect use. You have a bigger sound range to fill out, so you have the freedom to change up your sound a little bit. Play a more legato style. Don't play all the same riffs and notes as the guitar. Sustain your notes more with a big booming sound to give the song some atmosphere, and like FunkBass said, throw some accasional fills and variations to the song, it won't be as muddy as when you are playing with a twin guitar attack. (Troy Sanders of Mastodon does this very well).

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#5
You should listen to Steve Harris (Iron Maiden) He makes roots interesting. Even though they ave like 3 guitars, his technique should be more than enough to fill it out. :cheers
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#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Actually, I rate Ryan Martinie higher than Rex Brown in filling out a song with the bassline.


This is gonna be embarrasing, but who's Ryan Martinie?

Ive actually been digging Sharlee D'angelo's playing in Arch Enemy for the past few weeks. Its fairly straight forward, but really tasteful and fits their style so well. Also, anyone in a band with Michael Amott doesnt get much time to show off.
#8
In general, start simple. Root notes, following the guitar and a mix of these is often the best way to start. Gets simple and effective lines.

Begin to add fills in. Quick scale runs and arpeggios to accent key moments in the song. Also experiment with counter melodies in the slower and/or less dense passages of the songs.

However, most metal requires bass to be a sledgehammer, and kick the listener in the teeth ina way the kick drum can't.

In metal, you need to work really well with both the drummer and guitarists. The drummer with more often than not define your freedoms with the bass drum. Double bass drumming generally brings about rapid root notes and fills, while slower bass drumming gives you more roomin the bass range to set about grooving.
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Last edited by gm jack at Nov 24, 2007,
#9
Quote by to_the_grave
This is gonna be embarrasing, but who's Ryan Martinie?

Ive actually been digging Sharlee D'angelo's playing in Arch Enemy for the past few weeks. Its fairly straight forward, but really tasteful and fits their style so well. Also, anyone in a band with Michael Amott doesnt get much time to show off.


Ryan Martinie is the bassist of Mudvayne. Check out Not Falling and World so Cold for great examples of filling in around the guitar.
#10
Listen to Dan Briggs from Between the Buried and Me. Even if you aren't interested in playing their blend of progressive death metal/hardcore, you can still take a lot from his style.

Also, try harmonizing with the guitar as if your bass were another guitar. I don't hear this too too often but why not give it a go?

And yes, overdrive will help tremendously.
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#11
I disagree. Overdrive and Distortion is not a must. In fact, I feel that distortion is one of those "make it easier on yourself" effects.

A little dirt is great, but if you listen to most of the big metal bassists: Steve Harris, Steve Digirogio, Shaun Malone, Rex Brown... distortion was either little or non existant.
#12
It really depends on his style. Modern metal bass playing generally has more grit to it than Steve Harris's playing, for example.

Also, I wasn't necessarily implying that his entire tone would consist of overdriven bass. I find it more tasteful to click on the distortion in certain sections, such as when one is harmonizing with the guitar in the same octave or during a very heavy section.
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#14
Yeah, this isn't the guy who's account this, I'm a friend but anyways, if you want to hear some of the best Bassists ever check out: Cliff Burton, Steve DiGiorgio (Death, Sadus, and many more), Sean Malone (Cynic and Gordian Knot), Alex Webster (Cannibal Corpse), and for non-metal bassists Vic Wooten, Steve Bailey, and Stu Hamm.

If you have a fretless bass or plan on getting one any time soon then look at Steve Bailey, Steve DiGiorgio, And Sean Malone definately.
#15
Quote by x13xWrAiThx13x
Yeah, this isn't the guy who's account this, I'm a friend but anyways, if you want to hear some of the best Bassists ever check out: Cliff Burton, Steve DiGiorgio (Death, Sadus, and many more), Sean Malone (Cynic and Gordian Knot), Alex Webster (Cannibal Corpse), and for non-metal bassists Vic Wooten, Steve Bailey, and Stu Hamm.

If you have a fretless bass or plan on getting one any time soon then look at Steve Bailey, Steve DiGiorgio, And Sean Malone definately.


Thanks for being so condescending. You do realise you're talking to a specialised part of the forum for bass, and those names are splashed around like no-one's business? Do you HONESTLY think we havn't heard of Cliff Burton (mosst ovverated bassist on here), Steve, Sean and Alex (who have all been mentioned in this thread), let alone Victor bloody Wooten, Steve Bailey and Stu Hamm?
#16
I'd try and avoid the temptation to drown your sound in distortion. Think of distortion like ketchup - if your dinner tastes like **** then you can always cover it in ketchup but if it's good and you add just a little you make something great.

Seriously though, for a bass solo then go nuts with the effects but most metal bassists will keep it subtle the rest of the time.
#17
Also some more food for thought. Since you're in a three piece band and have no rhythym guitarist, your bassline should be more focused towards playing the chord progression, especially when your guitarist is soloing.

Once again, roots may be simple, but in a situation like this you don't have too much to work with.
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#18
Step 1: Listen to more Dream Theater

Step 2: ???

Step 3: Become a metal-bass god


Yeah really.
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#19
Dream THeater?


No.

Try Bathory.
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#20
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Thanks for being so condescending. You do realise you're talking to a specialised part of the forum for bass, and those names are splashed around like no-one's business? Do you HONESTLY think we havn't heard of Cliff Burton (mosst ovverated bassist on here), Steve, Sean and Alex (who have all been mentioned in this thread), let alone Victor bloody Wooten, Steve Bailey and Stu Hamm?


i was going to say something, but i guess you covered it better :/
#21
Bathory... the bass in that seems quite simple and hard to hear although i only have Nordland II and Hammerheart
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#22
Listen to Death on their "Human" and 'Individual Thought Patterns" albums. Great basswork by Steve DiGiorgio.