#1
i tried teh search bar and i didnt find what i wanted so i'll try it here

what are opinions on the fender vg strat. it seems too good to be true. but do you think it really is?
#2
Well, it's a bit like Ibanez marketing the Steve Vai EP7 as their first signature acoustic, 'forgetting' about the Paul Gilbert PGA's.

You might be wondering what the hell am I on about? The thing is a few years ago Fender introduced a standard Stratocaster, but with a Roland pickup already installed, sounds familiar?

This guitar probably didn't catch on very well so they tried it again a few years later, but with a few tweeks.


If you ask me, the 'first version' of the VG strat is a better guitar, because you can use it with the regular Roland equipment, thereby not limiting you to the tunings and options Fender have chosen for you.

The general idea of the VG is cool and there is something to say for the simplicity, especially when compared to products such as the Gibson Les Paul Digital, however I find the earlier digital strat or a regular new Fender, but with a Roland pickup, a much better alternative.


Just for fun:

The VG strat:



The Roland Ready Strat:



It's under 700$, Mexican made and with a GK-2 pickup.

The Ritchie Blackmore Strat:





Also, about it being to good to be true, you'd want it to be that way on a guitar with a price tag like that. You see, eventhough this technology is really cool, companies like Line 6 and Roland have already developed it to a point where you really need good tones to justify the price.

I still feel like there are better ways to get into digital guitars:

1) get a regular Fender and equip it with a Roland system. If you don't like having a bulky appliance on your instrument, get the Roland Ready Strat.

2) get a Line 6 Variax

3) get a Variax, take out the electronics and put them on a guitar of your choice (provided they will fit in that model).
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Nov 27, 2007,
#3
^+1 Get the Variax, but if you get the 700 you won't need to put the guts in any other guitar. The 700 is very nice on it's own.
Dean Icon PZ
Line 6 Variax 700
Dean V-Wing
Dean ML 79 SilverBurst
MXR M 108
H2O Chorus/Echo
Valve Junior (V3 Head/Cab and Combo)
VHT Special 6
Phonic 620 Power Pod PA
Wampler Super Plextortion
Line 6 Pod HD
#4
Man, just get an american, or standard, strat. learn all of those tunings. I played the VG strat. I was NOT impressed by it.
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Classic Ebony with gold hardware
Fender American Stratocaster 3 color sunburst maple fretboard tortoise shell pickguard
Martin 000-M Auditorium
Mesa Boogie F-50
Maxon OD-9
Dunlop 535Q Wah pedal
#5
I think it's alright, and it's good that it's a MIA strat, so respectable even without the crazy digital crap.

That said, I like the digital crap too. Instant retuning = awesome.
#6
The VG strikes me as extremely usefull in a live situation. Instead of strapping on a Tele, then a Strat, then a LP, then an acoustic, then a Drop D RG, then an open D hollow body, you can get 90% of the tone of each with a knob turn. Sounds handy, and very efficient.
#7
Quote by Danno13
I think it's alright, and it's good that it's a MIA strat, so respectable even without the crazy digital crap.

That said, I like the digital crap too. Instant retuning = awesome.



Well it's not really retuning...

As much as I hate Gibson and their marketing they are right in saying that the VG doesn't really retune.

It just lowers the pitch by a certain amount, but it doesn't correct any tuning mistakes. If a string is slightly out of tune and you select a different tuning mode, like baritone, it's still out of tune just lower.

On the other hand, how hard is it to keep a guitar in standard tuning?
You've read it, you can't un-read it!