#1
I've been seeing ads for it in guitar mags for a while but I've only just checked it out. I found out about it in the Metal Method forum of all places. It costs quite a bit but there is a LOT of material, most prominent of which are the 32 hour-long DVDs.

http://www.absolutelyunderstandguitar.com/#


Anybody?
#2
I have it. I'm only a third of the way through it, so I can't really comment on it as a whole. I'm very confident that it will deliver the goods, though. I've already learned a great deal about music. You have to understand that the course will not teach you how to play guitar per se. There is very little technique taught. It's all about music theory. Scotty likes to refer to the guitar as a "dumb machine", analogous to a typewriter. One has to understand the language(music, with guitar) to properly use either machine, though it's possible to fumble around and end up with something usable. I'm really looking forward to completing the course because my knowledge of theory has been extremely limited. Scotty is an excellent teacher and I think that just about any guitarist can benefit from his course.

It's not a flashy package. There are no fancy labels on the 16 DVD's(each one has two one-hour lessons), everything sits in a simple binder, and you have to put together the slide rule yourself. The nuts and bolts of the course is what matters and nobody else has a system like this. I really believe Scotty's course is in a class by itself. It's pricey, yes, and I'm sure a lot of people aren't willing to pay so much to learn theory. Ask anybody that knows their theory if it was worth the time and effort to gain their knowledge. Absolutely Understand Guitar gives you all the tools you need in one package to achieve that end. You'll learn scales, intervals, chords, music notation and ear training. If you have the cash, go for it.
#3
Thanks for the detailed response dude. You seem to be quite the instructional DVD junkie as well; you've mentioned in my other thread that you also own Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz and I think the John McLaughlin DVDs also.

I'm actually choosing among 3 different courses now and I'd like to know which one of them is the best for my money. They all cost almost the same which is why I grouped them together.

- Learn and Master Guitar with Steve Krenz ($200)

They're actually adding to the 10 current DVDs right? That makes for 20 DVDs, 5 CDs of Jam Tracks and a workbook. This is probably the first guitar course I've seen with a price tag over 100 bucks. It looks very well produced and Steve Krenz actually posts on the official message board which I guess means he stands by his product. I also like how the basics of different genres are covered.

- Completely Understand Guitar with Scotty West ($200)

This has 32 DVDs and a workbook. Like teegee said, it's really more about the theory aspect which is half the equation in playing guitar. I've had the most problem with theory and I think most every other beginner has as well; it would be nice to finally understand what it is I'm playing and be able to understand what other people are playing as well.

Just a question for teegee though; when you say music theory, I'm assuming you mean as it applies to guitar correct? I've already tried learning theory more than once and I usually stop before I learn to apply it the guitar. I know how to pick out notes on the fretboard already but that's it. I do it slowly as well

- Metal Method 2007 Package deal ($145)

The grandpappy of instructional videos, since 1982. I've seen this on every guitar magazine I've ever had. The package I'm thinking of getting includes the Basic Course, Speed Kills 1,2 &3, Speed Lives and Classic Metal Riffs. I'm getting the 2007 version which apparently moves in a more relaxed pace than the original one. I'm particularly looking forward to Stage 6 which focuses on the theory aspect as well. Once I get my theory down, that ambidextrous freakshow MAB will "give me the keys to the Lamborghini" Doug Marks has been around for a while and he's also a regular on the message boards so that gives this course some credibility.
Last edited by pfizer at Nov 28, 2007,
#4
Quote by pfizer
Thanks for the detailed response dude. You seem to be quite the instructional DVD junkie as well; you've mentioned in my other thread that you also own Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz and I think the John McLaughlin DVDs also.

I don't have the McLaughlin set, but I am quite the junkie, yes. I'd love to be able to afford weekly private lessons, but home study courses are simply more economical for me. Besides, it's seems like many of the people that give lessons haven't been playing for more than a few years.

I'm actually choosing among 3 different courses now and I'd like to know which one of them is the best for my money. They all cost almost the same which is why I grouped them together.
Quote by pfizer

- Learn and Master Guitar with Steve Krenz ($200)

They're actually adding to the 10 current DVDs right? That makes for 20 DVDs, 5 CDs of Jam Tracks and a workbook.
Correct. I don't know how much more they're going to charge for the additional 10 DVD's, though.
Quote by pfizer

- Completely Understand Guitar with Scotty West ($200)

This has 32 DVDs and a workbook.
It has 16 DVD's, each containing two one-hour lessons.
Quote by pfizer

Just a question for teegee though; when you say music theory, I'm assuming you mean as it applies to guitar correct? I've already tried learning theory more than once and I usually stop before I learn to apply it the guitar. I know how to pick out notes on the fretboard already but that's it. I do it slowly as well

Yes, it's all about music theory as it relates to guitar. I've struggled with theory as well and it's starting to come together thanks to Scotty. Some people can learn theory by reading a book, but Scotty teaches with a visual method for the rest of us.

So here's my advice. If all you want to do is play metal and nothing else, get Metal Method. If you're a novice and you have to choose between L&MG or AUG, get Learn & Master Guitar. It will teach you techniques for a variety of styles, as well as provide you with a decent foundation for theory. Once you build up your chops, get AUG. It will teach you theory inside and out, and really strengthen your ear training. Both of those things will make you a better player. You'll not only be able to play music, but actually understand what you're playing. You'll be able to transcribe music much easier and quicker than most people. You'll also be able to compose something in your head and immediately know how to play it on your guitar, rather than fumbling around to find the right notes. If you were an intermediate player I would suggest getting AUG first, but it just isn't strong enough with technique for me to recommend to a novice. Best of luck with your decision. Let us know how things work out. I won't be the least bit offended if you don't follow my advice either.
#5
Quote by pfizer
Thanks for the detailed response dude. You seem to be quite the instructional DVD junkie as well; you've mentioned in my other thread that you also own Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz and I think the John McLaughlin DVDs also

I don't have the McLaughlin set, but I am quite the junkie, yes. I'd love to be able to afford weekly private lessons, but home study courses are simply more economical for me. Besides, it's seems like many of the people that give lessons haven't been playing for more than a few years.
Quote by pfizer

I'm actually choosing among 3 different courses now and I'd like to know which one of them is the best for my money. They all cost almost the same which is why I grouped them together.

- Learn and Master Guitar with Steve Krenz ($200)

They're actually adding to the 10 current DVDs right? That makes for 20 DVDs, 5 CDs of Jam Tracks and a workbook.
Correct, though you can usually find it for $150 thanks to a "sale" that never seems to end. I don't know how much more they're going to charge for the additional 10 DVD's, though.
Quote by pfizer

- Completely Understand Guitar with Scotty West ($200)

This has 32 DVDs and a workbook.
It has 16 DVD's, each containing two one-hour lessons.
Quote by pfizer

Just a question for teegee though; when you say music theory, I'm assuming you mean as it applies to guitar correct? I've already tried learning theory more than once and I usually stop before I learn to apply it the guitar. I know how to pick out notes on the fretboard already but that's it. I do it slowly as well

Yes, it's all about music theory as it relates to guitar. I've struggled with theory as well and it's starting to come together thanks to Scotty. Some people can learn theory by reading a book, but Scotty teaches with a visual method for the rest of us.

So here's my advice. If all you want to do is play metal and nothing else, get Metal Method. If you're a novice and you have to choose between L&MG or AUG, get Learn & Master Guitar. It will teach you techniques for a variety of styles, as well as provide you with a decent foundation for theory. It doesn't really cover metal, though. There are plenty of free resources for that online, though. Once you build up your chops, get AUG. It will teach you theory inside and out, and really strengthen your ear training. Both of those things will make you a better player. You'll not only be able to play music, but actually understand what you're playing. You'll be able to transcribe music much easier and quicker than most people. You'll also be able to compose something in your head and immediately know how to play it on your guitar, rather than fumbling around to find the right notes. If you were an intermediate player I would suggest getting AUG first, but it just isn't strong enough with technique for me to recommend to a novice. Best of luck with your decision. Let us know how things work out. I won't be the least bit offended if you don't follow my advice either.
#6
^ Wow, thanks for the great advice dude.

I don't really consider myself a metal head per se but I do really like it. Just a question; when you say 'metal', what kind of metal are we talking about? Doug Marks seems to be from the hair metal age which I do like but I'm leaning more towards the more modern stuff like Pantera, Trivium or Dethklok (who cares if they're a cartoon band?).

I'm also looking to play other stuff, blues and fingerstyle guitar in particular.

I'm not really sure if I'm a novice or intermediate. I mean, I kind of know what scales are but I have no idea how to use them. I can't 'solo' in any discernable or logical way and modes just plain confuse me. I do know the musical alphabet only goes up to G and that B-C and E-F has no sharps. That's it.
Last edited by pfizer at Nov 29, 2007,
#8
Quote by pfizer
Just a question; when you say 'metal', what kind of metal are we talking about?
It is sort of an all-encompassing term, always has been. There are so many different sub-genres. I tend to use the term "metal" with a broad stroke. I don't know that there is a definitive definition, it's just one of those things that you just know when you hear it. I'm of the 80's metal crowd, myself. I find 95% of modern stuff unlistenable, to be honest. Some of these guys have no concept of melody, or simply choose to ignore it.

I'm sort of in the same boat as you in terms of overall development, though it's entirely possible that you're a better player than me. I've been at this off and on for over a year, though it feels like I had not noticeably progressed until about four months ago. This was about the time that I started putting a lot more effort into my learning and practicing. A lot of time was wasted wandering aimlessly before that. Now I have some well mapped-out direction. I wouldn't say I'm a beginner, but I'm not completely comfortable using the word "intermediate" to describe myself. I think the mid-level of proficiency has at least a few degrees and I'm definitely at the lower end of that spectrum.
#9
Quote by teegee420
It is sort of an all-encompassing term, always has been. There are so many different sub-genres. I tend to use the term "metal" with a broad stroke. I don't know that there is a definitive definition, it's just one of those things that you just know when you hear it. I'm of the 80's metal crowd, myself. I find 95% of modern stuff unlistenable, to be honest. Some of these guys have no concept of melody, or simply choose to ignore it.


True that. I'm actually quite fickle with the "metal" I listen to; melody is a very big thing for me which is why I never really got into bands like Slayer or Lamb of God who, while extremely heavy, can get very unmelodic. One of the most melodic "bands" I've heard in while is Dethklok. I kid you not, their music is a perfect mix of heavy riffing and incredible melody. Try listening to "Hatredcopter" and "Bloodtrocuted". They are insane.

And right now, I'm laughing at myself as I keep referring to Dethklok as "they".

Quote by teegee420
I'm sort of in the same boat as you in terms of overall development, though it's entirely possible that you're a better player than me. I've been at this off and on for over a year, though it feels like I had not noticeably progressed until about four months ago. This was about the time that I started putting a lot more effort into my learning and practicing. A lot of time was wasted wandering aimlessly before that. Now I have some well mapped-out direction. I wouldn't say I'm a beginner, but I'm not completely comfortable using the word "intermediate" to describe myself. I think the mid-level of proficiency has at least a few degrees and I'm definitely at the lower end of that spectrum.


I can almost guarantee you I'm a worse player. I cannot jam or improvise in any way, I haven't transcribed any song ever and to top it off, I'm a sloppy player. Frankly, I'm tired of that which is kind of why I'm obsessing over videos right now instead of actual gear. I mean, a new guitar is nice but being able to actually play it is a whole lot nicer

So here's the thing dude; I might get MM, LaMG AND CUG and go through them in that order exactly. MM first to satisfy my metal cravings and build my chops (with the "Speed Kills" series), LaMG to start building by foundation and CUG to complete the entire "guitar building". That sound about right?
#10
Quote by pfizer
True that. I'm actually quite fickle with the "metal" I listen to; melody is a very big thing for me which is why I never really got into bands like Slayer or Lamb of God who, while extremely heavy, can get very unmelodic. One of the most melodic "bands" I've heard in while is Dethklok. I kid you not, their music is a perfect mix of heavy riffing and incredible melody. Try listening to "Hatredcopter" and "Bloodtrocuted". They are insane.

And right now, I'm laughing at myself as I keep referring to Dethklok as "they".


I can almost guarantee you I'm a worse player. I cannot jam or improvise in any way, I haven't transcribed any song ever and to top it off, I'm a sloppy player. Frankly, I'm tired of that which is kind of why I'm obsessing over videos right now instead of actual gear. I mean, a new guitar is nice but being able to actually play it is a whole lot nicer

So here's the thing dude; I might get MM, LaMG AND CUG and go through them in that order exactly. MM first to satisfy my metal cravings and build my chops (with the "Speed Kills" series), LaMG to start building by foundation and CUG to complete the entire "guitar building". That sound about right?



Honestly, I'd say forget about CUG.

Just get LaMG and MM and you'll be set. LaMG is coming out with 10 more dvd's so just get those and MM and ya, that is all you'll probably really need and by the time you get through these products you'll be a fairly advanced player--no doubt. By the time you get done with LaMG and MM you will be advanced enough that anything else you need to learn will be a piece of cake.

Now that you know the products you need, get them, and start practicing--everything will eventually blend together and you will see the big picture and that's what it's really all about.
Last edited by NocturnalOats at Nov 30, 2007,
#11
My problem I have with Theory books/DVD's is that the teacher uses words that I don't know and goes way to fast for me to understand.\. Do these DVD's take it step by little step or just step by large step (hopefully you know what I mean)?
#13
Quote by NocturnalOats
Honestly, I'd say forget about CUG.

Just get LaMG and MM and you'll be set. LaMG is coming out with 10 more dvd's so just get those and MM and ya, that is all you'll probably really need and by the time you get through these products you'll be a fairly advanced player--no doubt. By the time you get done with LaMG and MM you will be advanced enough that anything else you need to learn will be a piece of cake.

Now that you know the products you need, get them, and start practicing--everything will eventually blend together and you will see the big picture and that's what it's really all about.


Thanks for your opinion dude. Do you by any chance have any of the video materials I mentioned? I'd really like to know what you think of them and how they helped you as a guitar player. Is there anything in particular you don't really like in Scotty West's course? What about the things you did find useful in MM and LaMG? I might be spending upwards of $500 worth of instructional material here so I really want to be sure of their quality before I get up and buy them.

Quote by NocturnalOats
My problem I have with Theory books/DVD's is that the teacher uses words that I don't know and goes way to fast for me to understand.\. Do these DVD's take it step by little step or just step by large step (hopefully you know what I mean)? Also, are these all just for metal theory?


Same here dude. I mean, I just barely find out what a "chord" is a while ago and suddenly the guy is talking about inverting them. I mean, I barely got to know the chord right-side-up! The people here have been saying that the courses I mentioned are clear and concise, and that gives me confidence.

As for metal theory, I'm guessing MM might be just what you need if you're looking into playing that style. It's also been around since the '80s so that's a point for them.
#14
Quote by AiCPearlJam
My problem I have with Theory books/DVD's is that the teacher uses words that I don't know and goes way to fast for me to understand.\. Do these DVD's take it step by little step or just step by large step (hopefully you know what I mean)?
Learn & Master Guitar and Absolutely(not "completely") Understand Guitar are perfectly doable by a complete beginner who knows next to nothing about theory and technique. I don't have any experience with Metal Method, so I can't speak for that one.
Quote by AiCPearlJam
Also, are these all just for metal theory

L&MG and AUG don't really cover metal at all. If all you want to do is play metal and you don't really want to learn theory, Metal Method would probably be best for you.
Quote by NocturnalOats
Honestly, I'd say forget about CUG.

Just get LaMG and MM and you'll be set. LaMG is coming out with 10 more dvd's so just get those and MM and ya, that is all you'll probably really need and by the time you get through these products you'll be a fairly advanced player--no doubt. By the time you get done with LaMG and MM you will be advanced enough that anything else you need to learn will be a piece of cake.
Don't sleep on Absolutely Understand Guitar, I'm telling you. L&MG and MM will teach you how to play. AUG will teach you to understand the language of music. It will teach you all about chord construction, chord progressions, keys, scales, modes, ear training and a lot more. It will give you a clear advantage over most of the guitarists out there that only have a limited knowledge of theory. I suppose the best answer for "which course(s) should I get?" would be all three. If I was really interested in playing metal, I would definitely get Metal Method. I'm just not there yet, though I don't rule out the possibility that that will change in the future.

There is so much good instruction out there. You could probably learn on the cheap and rely on free information online, but your resources will be spread over dozens of sites. You might find yourself spending as much time looking for lessons as actually playing. The advantage of paying for instruction courses is that they give you just about everything you need in one package and the material in laid out incrementally, building on what has been learned previously. Not everyone is willing to shell out serious cash for instruction, though, and I can understand that. I would already have the guitar I'm saving for if I hadn't spent my money on the two courses I have, but where would that leave me as a player? I'd be a complete noob with a shiny new guitar. It's kind of like having a brand new car without an engine.
#15
Quote by pfizer
I've been seeing ads for it in guitar mags for a while but I've only just checked it out. I found out about it in the Metal Method forum of all places. It costs quite a bit but there is a LOT of material, most prominent of which are the 32 hour-long DVDs.

http://www.absolutelyunderstandguitar.com/#


Anybody?



how much is it and is it worth it?
#16
Thank you I was only wondering because I don't play metal and didn't want to get a Metal oriented book.
#17
Quote by silly6-string
how much is it and is it worth it?
It's $200 plus shipping. If you want to know guitar music theory inside and out, then yes, it's worth it. If you don't want to be bothered with theory, then it's a waste of your money.
#18
Quote by teegee420
Learn & Master Guitar and Absolutely(not "completely") Understand Guitar are perfectly doable by a complete beginner who knows next to nothing about theory and technique. I don't have any experience with Metal Method, so I can't speak for that one.
L&MG and AUG don't really cover metal at all. If all you want to do is play metal and you don't really want to learn theory, Metal Method would probably be best for you.Don't sleep on Absolutely Understand Guitar, I'm telling you. L&MG and MM will teach you how to play. AUG will teach you to understand the language of music. It will teach you all about chord construction, chord progressions, keys, scales, modes, ear training and a lot more. It will give you a clear advantage over most of the guitarists out there that only have a limited knowledge of theory. I suppose the best answer for "which course(s) should I get?" would be all three. If I was really interested in playing metal, I would definitely get Metal Method. I'm just not there yet, though I don't rule out the possibility that that will change in the future.

There is so much good instruction out there. You could probably learn on the cheap and rely on free information online, but your resources will be spread over dozens of sites. You might find yourself spending as much time looking for lessons as actually playing. The advantage of paying for instruction courses is that they give you just about everything you need in one package and the material in laid out incrementally, building on what has been learned previously. Not everyone is willing to shell out serious cash for instruction, though, and I can understand that. I would already have the guitar I'm saving for if I hadn't spent my money on the two courses I have, but where would that leave me as a player? I'd be a complete noob with a shiny new guitar. It's kind of like having a brand new car without an engine.


Well said. The best way to supress GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome) is to really look at yourself as a player. Video lessons aren't technically "gear" right?

I've been looking around at every guitar site I could find and found some useful stuff and some stuff I couldn't understand, but I could never get the big picture. Most theory lessons start off fine but one important thing or term is always left out and I'm left wondering and wandering aimlessly. This is why I'm willing to shell out the cash if it'll finally let me become the guitarist I've always aspired to be.

Quote by teegee420
L&MG and AUG don't really cover metal at all. If all you want to do is play metal and you don't really want to learn theory, Metal Method would probably be best for you.


I believe Stage 6 of Metal Method does teach theory, albeit applied to hard rock and metal. The site says it'll teach playing by ear which is something I've always wanted to do but AUG apparently teaches that as well.
Last edited by pfizer at Dec 1, 2007,
#19
Quote by pfizer
I believe Stage 6 of Metal Method does teach theory, albeit applied to hard rock and metal. The site says it'll teach playing by ear which is something I've always wanted to do but AUG apparently teaches that as well.
I don't doubt that you'll get your feet wet in those two areas with Metal Method, but I guarantee that their truncated lessons aren't going to match the scope of Scotty's 32 hours of instruction. The great thing about the three courses is that they all have return policies. 30 days for MM and AUG, and 60 days for L&MG. Aside from around $15 for return shipping, you really have nothing to lose. Take the plunge with whichever one(s) you're feeling the most. You won't regret it.
#20
Okay, thanks again for your responses dude. How long would you say it'll take to go through AUG and LaMG, at a leisurely pace like 3 days a week for 1 hour?

Also, could you describe how both courses teach improvising? I remember watching a guitar video somewhere that said it would teach improvising and all it did was teach some scales and how to find the notes on the fretboard and basically left it at that. A friend of mine said all her solos sounded like she was just playing scales with almost no memorable melody.
#21
Quote by pfizer
Okay, thanks again for your responses dude. How long would you say it'll take to go through AUG and LaMG, at a leisurely pace like 3 days a week for 1 hour?
I would conservatively estimate at least a year for L&MG. I'm not far enough along with AUG to put forth an informed opinion. You could probably get through the theoretical stuff rather quickly, but the practical stuff will take much longer. Learning all the chords, intervals, scales etc. will take quite a bit of time. Much of it is memory intensive. And that's only the first part of things, because that knowledge is useless unless you're able to apply it to your playing ability. Being able to utilize all of the concepts on your guitar will take lots of repetition and experimenting. Developing your ear training will take a long time as well.
Quote by pfizer

Also, could you describe how both courses teach improvising? I remember watching a guitar video somewhere that said it would teach improvising and all it did was teach some scales and how to find the notes on the fretboard and basically left it at that. A friend of mine said all her solos sounded like she was just playing scales with almost no memorable melody.
Again, I haven't gotten far enough with AUG to accurately describe this aspect. I'm just now getting into scales. L&MG focuses mainly on the pentatonic scale. It details five different keys and different patterns and how to connect them. It's actually a decent method to begin improvising, but much of your ability will come with trial and error. There's really no magical method to improvising.

I do know that AUG goes into much greater detail with regard to scales, intervals and playing in all 12 keys. It talks a lot about the musical number system. The "do re mi" scale is actually the major diatonic scale. It's expressed numerically as 1-8, with sharps and flats used in between, depending on the interval(s) between notes. Scotty teaches this way to make it easier to play all 12 keys. I know it's not an original concept, but I haven't seen anyone else explain scales this way. Knowing all of the notes in a given scale is one thing, but actually knowing why they're in the scale and how to play them anywhere on the fretboard will facilitate greater improvisational ability.

To use an analogy, a cook is only as good as his/her ingredients, but the real talent lies in one's ability to put together the right combination to make a great meal. The same goes for guitar. The greater the number of ingredients you have, the better, but in the end it's up to you to create the music. Strictly speaking for myself here, only time will tell if I have what it takes. I hope to be in a much better position to gauge my aptitude in a year or two.
#22
Quote by teegee420
I would conservatively estimate at least a year for L&MG. I'm not far enough along with AUG to put forth an informed opinion. You could probably get through the theoretical stuff rather quickly, but the practical stuff will take much longer. Learning all the chords, intervals, scales etc. will take quite a bit of time. Much of it is memory intensive. And that's only the first part of things, because that knowledge is useless unless you're able to apply it to your playing ability. Being able to utilize all of the concepts on your guitar will take lots of repetition and experimenting. Developing your ear training will take a long time as well.Again, I haven't gotten far enough with AUG to accurately describe this aspect. I'm just now getting into scales. L&MG focuses mainly on the pentatonic scale. It details five different keys and different patterns and how to connect them. It's actually a decent method to begin improvising, but much of your ability will come with trial and error. There's really no magical method to improvising.

I do know that AUG goes into much greater detail with regard to scales, intervals and playing in all 12 keys. It talks a lot about the musical number system. The "do re mi" scale is actually the major diatonic scale. It's expressed numerically as 1-8, with sharps and flats used in between, depending on the interval(s) between notes. Scotty teaches this way to make it easier to play all 12 keys. I know it's not an original concept, but I haven't seen anyone else explain scales this way. Knowing all of the notes in a given scale is one thing, but actually knowing why they're in the scale and how to play them anywhere on the fretboard will facilitate greater improvisational ability.

To use an analogy, a cook is only as good as his/her ingredients, but the real talent lies in one's ability to put together the right combination to make a great meal. The same goes for guitar. The greater the number of ingredients you have, the better, but in the end it's up to you to create the music. Strictly speaking for myself here, only time will tell if I have what it takes. I hope to be in a much better position to gauge my aptitude in a year or two.


Nice analogy there Your responses have been invaluable my friend. I think I'm getting Metal Method and LaMG (I hope....) so I'll keep you updated with my progress. I'll check back on this topic again sometime later. Again, thanks to everyone!
#23
i actually bought it months ago, haven't really made it past the third lesson.
i'm not real interested in "music theory" yet, just starting out and want to learn some songs .
#24
In my opinion, learning songs you want to play shouldn't get in the way of getting your music theory down and vice versa. Trust me, it'll be for the best in the long run. By all means, go ahead and learn all the songs you want but take the time to find out the theory behind them.

This was a fatal mistake I made when I was first starting out; almost immediately, I tried learning "Smooth" by Santana. As soon as I found out how to read tab, I worked on the song and since I didn't warm-up or exercise, all I could do after a month was the intro riff. Of course, being a kid, I got frustrated and gave up guitar for almost 2 years. I got back into it when I was unknowingly drafted as a guitarist for a band. Here's how the conversation went:

"Hey dude!"
"What?"
"You know how to play guitar?"
"....A little."
"Great!" (writes something on paper)
"What's that?"
"I just signed us up for a band performance! We gotta learn 4 songs!"
"****!"

I only learned chords when I was already in a "band". We were all basically clueless with our respective instruments with the exception of our bassist who already had some knowledge of theory. We ended up performing "Swing Swing" by All-American Rejects, "What's My Age Again" by Blink182, "Passenger Seat" by Stephen Speaks and "Perfect" by Simple Plan. Yeah, we went "punk" cause none of could really play
#25
^^Everybody has to start somewhere. It was pretty ballsy of you to give it a shot despite your limitations.
#26
Quote by teegee420
^^Everybody has to start somewhere. It was pretty ballsy of you to give it a shot despite your limitations.


Thanks for that I just wish I'd gotten off to a better start y'know?

I just got the 'preliminary' present from my uncle; It's An Illustrated History of Guitar which is basically guitar porn. I hope he got me those guitar lessons
Last edited by pfizer at Dec 8, 2007,
#27
Hey, just got L&MG! I've already gone through the first two sections and the basics of music notation.

I think some people may be right in calling this a bit of a "grandpa" course because of the laidback and ambient presentation but the instruction is very clear and concise (thus far) and Steve Krenz is a good teacher with a pleasant demeanor.

That being said, the course is probably aimed at the older guitar players, those who have the time and patience to take things step by step. I haven't seen Metal Method yet except for the short clips online but when I do get my hands on it, I'll be sure to post a comparison here. Some people might not like the very "Esteban-ish" style L&MG has but I wouldn't discredit it yet; I am still pretty early on in the course after all. Metal heads WILL NOT like this course, I can tell you that

AUG by Scotty West is also on my list so wait for my review of that one....
#28
I'm familiar with Esteban, but I don't know what you mean by the comparison. I've seen Esteban's instruction DVD's and they're not nearly as good as L&MG.
#29
I mean the candles and the ambient lighting. I happened to see some of Esteban's "instructional" videos and they don't come anywhere close to the quality of instruction of L&MG. Esteban just teaches to you to play a song without any explanation whatsoever and then basically says, "Hey, you're a guitarist!".

On another note, can you describe Scotty West's teaching style? I saw some shots of him with a white board and hand-drawn chord charts and also what looks like a keyboard. It looks kinda low-tech to me but again, I care about his teaching.
#30
Quote by pfizer
On another note, can you describe Scotty West's teaching style? I saw some shots of him with a white board and hand-drawn chord charts and also what looks like a keyboard. It looks kinda low-tech to me but again, I care about his teaching.
It's very low-tech. In fact, the videos were produced in 1999 and originally for VHS(gasp!). While they're well-shot, there aren't any kind of fancy overlay graphics, and the set is certainly not as visually pleasing as L&MG's production values. As I mentioned in a previous post, there is nothing flashy about this set. The nuts and bolts lie in Scotty's teaching, which is excellent. Everything is broken down in an easy to understand manner. He really manages to demystify a lot of subjects that I just couldn't quite grasp before. Every lesson is summarized in the written material, quite well in fact. I haven't had to take any notes yet because everything is already there. Another good thing about Scotty is that he's fairly accessible by email. I've emailed him maybe around six times now and he has always gotten back to me within a day, usually within hours if it's a weekday. He'll even answer your questions before you buy, like he did for me. Seriously, you can email him yourself if you're wondering about the sections I haven't gotten around to yet. Just send your questions to "auguitar@capecod.net".
#31
Quote by teegee420
It's very low-tech. In fact, the videos were produced in 1999 and originally for VHS(gasp!). While they're well-shot, there aren't any kind of fancy overlay graphics, and the set is certainly not as visually pleasing as L&MG's production values. As I mentioned in a previous post, there is nothing flashy about this set. The nuts and bolts lie in Scotty's teaching, which is excellent. Everything is broken down in an easy to understand manner. He really manages to demystify a lot of subjects that I just couldn't quite grasp before. Every lesson is summarized in the written material, quite well in fact. I haven't had to take any notes yet because everything is already there. Another good thing about Scotty is that he's fairly accessible by email. I've emailed him maybe around six times now and he has always gotten back to me within a day, usually within hours if it's a weekday. He'll even answer your questions before you buy, like he did for me. Seriously, you can email him yourself if you're wondering about the sections I haven't gotten around to yet. Just send your questions to "auguitar@capecod.net".


Cool. Hey, teegee, I think you've just helped me uncover three of the most essential guitar instructional DVDs out there! They're all quite pricey but they're all comprehensive and the creators of the products stand behind them 100%. I'm getting all of them; MM for metal and chop-building, L&MG for rounding out my playing , and AUG for theory and ear training. Now I just gotta save the cash and find out how to buy them from here in the Philippines
#32
I checked out the Metal Method forum and I see that you have already ordered it. Congrats. Did you get the Speed Kills DVD's too?
Last edited by teegee420 at Dec 12, 2007,
#33
I got the package with the 11 DVDs which costs around $150. That's the 6 Basic Stages, Speed Kills 1,2&3, Speed Lives, and Classic Metal Licks. It all looks nice and polished; Doug completely re-shot the entire Metal Method Basic Course so it has animated tab and close-ups. Batio is an ambidextrous freakshow but he's also a pretty good teacher although I still prefer Paul Gilbert's teaching style. I'm thinking of getting the Complete Intense Rock DVD as well but I'm thinking that might be a but too much right now.