#1
hey, i was wondering if anyone knows any good ways to learn how to pllay metal style solo's and tips and ideas to help me improve the spped that i play. have only been playing a little while so would love some help from you guys

Mattinho

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#2
depends on what type of metal? if u wanna do the classic rock meets metal old school way, use a minor major or pentatonic use lots of bends speed and wah at the emphasis points even if u want the shred new school way learn yr alternate picking yr sweeping pinch harmonics and directional picking, and use dark scales like harmonic minor it all depends metals a big genere old school metals a lil easier :P
#3
Quote by natedapunk
depends on what type of metal? if u wanna do the classic rock meets metal old school way, use a minor major or pentatonic use lots of bends speed and wah at the emphasis points even if u want the shred new school way learn yr alternate picking yr sweeping pinch harmonics and directional picking, and use dark scales like harmonic minor it all depends metals a big genere old school metals a lil easier :P



well i like the old school stuff but want to mix that with the shredding and other aspects of the newer stuff. . . so really i need helpp with playing fast and the scales to use.

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#4
well id try sticking to pentatonic and minors than maybe some phrydian and try and some nice emphasis points with bends and wah and than use some pinch harmonics and maybe some sweep for maybe that fressh touch on things. also id try and start slow and end fast for yr solo
#5
I have a fair bit of trouble with metal soloing, because the phrasing is very very odd in comparison to other genres. It's quite jazz-like in a lot of aspects, but these days the classical influence is stronger than ever. Basically, use these scales:

- Pentatonic
- Natural Minor
- Phrygian
- Harmonic Minor

Use others, too, but these are the main and, in my opinion, best sounding ones. Now, onto the actual phrasing. In metal, you generally have periods of fast playing dispersed by melodic lines and "tension notes".
"Tension notes" I find, tend to be minor thirds, fourths and fifths, although I always tend to bend them so you might want to take those a step up.
The end of a solo is very important. Try ending on a natural seventh. This leaves a bit of a hanging end and again, creates tension that you resolve by entering into the next part of a song.
Don't be afraid to break the scale, especially in metal. Since you're largely soloing over power chords, only the diminished fifth sounds truly dissonant over the root chord. That said, try to stay in key for most melodic and shred phrases, but it won't hurt to play some notes out of key so you can resolve them in-key.

Techniques to keep in mind are legato and bending for traditional metal, and later on you can break into tapping and sweeping.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#6
You should find tabs for a couple of the solo styles that would like to mimic and learn them( at least four or five). Then pick a part the solos and anylyze what that guitar player is doing as in what scales is he using over what chords, note the techniques( sweep picking, tapping, legato), also something most people forget about make sure to look at the reacurring rythems in the solos.

Another good tip is that your prob. have some difficulty because your fingers arn't moving very creativly so find some exercises that get your fingers moving in a way that makes you very uncomfertable. It will get you thinking outside the box.
#7
thanks guys i'lll give all that a try =]
can anyone recomend any good beginner solos?

\m/\m/
#9
Quote by MadassAlex
I have a fair bit of trouble with metal soloing, because the phrasing is very very odd in comparison to other genres. It's quite jazz-like in a lot of aspects, but these days the classical influence is stronger than ever. Basically, use these scales:

- Pentatonic
- Natural Minor
- Phrygian
- Harmonic Minor

Use others, too, but these are the main and, in my opinion, best sounding ones. Now, onto the actual phrasing. In metal, you generally have periods of fast playing dispersed by melodic lines and "tension notes".
"Tension notes" I find, tend to be minor thirds, fourths and fifths, although I always tend to bend them so you might want to take those a step up.
The end of a solo is very important. Try ending on a natural seventh. This leaves a bit of a hanging end and again, creates tension that you resolve by entering into the next part of a song.
Don't be afraid to break the scale, especially in metal. Since you're largely soloing over power chords, only the diminished fifth sounds truly dissonant over the root chord. That said, try to stay in key for most melodic and shred phrases, but it won't hurt to play some notes out of key so you can resolve them in-key.

Techniques to keep in mind are legato and bending for traditional metal, and later on you can break into tapping and sweeping.


Great advice. Just thought I'd say.
#10
i can already play that solo looking for more with speed and sweeping in

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#11
lol u said beuingger i wouldnt call a fast sweep solo a beuginner solo, but maybe u should look at some bodem
#12
Try the solo from Call of Ktulu (Metallica). It's got everyhing you could ever wish for in a solo.
#13
try to learn to tap. its not very difficult once you get the basic idea. and tapping allows you to play 3-4 notes, for a whole bar or two, and have it be acceptable. basically, tapping is not that hard, and it sounds/looks impressive.