#1
I've got an old Martin acoustic from the 70's. It was my grandpa's. Recently I've noticed a little crack in the back. About 5 inches horizontally going with the grain.

Anything special to do with it to stop the spread of the crack or fix it completely? Would my local music shop know what to do?

Any help is appreciated.
#2
Yeah, bring it to your local shop. It was probably becuase of the environment it was stored in. To much humidity is what possibly cause it. It can probably be repaired. Just bring it in as soon as possable.
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#3
Quote by neonflannel
Yeah, bring it to your local shop. It was probably becuase of the environment it was stored in. To much humidity is what possibly cause it. It can probably be repaired. Just bring it in as soon as possable.


Thanks a lot.
#4
Quote by neonflannel
Yeah, bring it to your local shop. It was probably becuase of the environment it was stored in. To much humidity is what possibly cause it. It can probably be repaired. Just bring it in as soon as possable.


Say what? I think you mean too little humidity. Too dry of conditions will eventually lead to cracks, not too moist. What's easier to break, an old dried out stick laying on the ground for a few years, or a freshly cut branch from a tree?

To threadstarter, a professional luthier may be able to fix it, but it'll cost you. Repairs of this sort are generally very time consuming. Sometimes the guitar needs to be taken apart in order to do it. The wood will have to be brought back to correct moisture levels as well if the fix is to take. And, after repairs, the guitar needs to be kept at the correct humidity levels at all times. Best of luck to you.
#5
Cracks don't cost much to fix and they should be fixed by a pro if the guitar is something you care about. Don't worry too much about it. Just take it in when you can and from now on try and make sure you keep your guitar in the right enviroment.

Wood shrinking and expanding is what causes the cracks. Most guitar makers say keep your guitar at 50% humidity. I recomend 40% but they can usually go as low as 30% without damaging the instrument and they can go as high as 80%. What you can't do is go straight from 80% to 30% because that will cause cracking.
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#6
Quote by LeftyDave
Say what? I think you mean too little humidity. Too dry of conditions will eventually lead to cracks, not too moist. What's easier to break, an old dried out stick laying on the ground for a few years, or a freshly cut branch from a tree?

To threadstarter, a professional luthier may be able to fix it, but it'll cost you. Repairs of this sort are generally very time consuming. Sometimes the guitar needs to be taken apart in order to do it. The wood will have to be brought back to correct moisture levels as well if the fix is to take. And, after repairs, the guitar needs to be kept at the correct humidity levels at all times. Best of luck to you.

Agreed. With a guitar of this value, I'd invest in a humidification system. During these cold, dry months, I actually own a humidifier that keeps my room at 50% humidity. Not only does it help me breathe easier, but it's good for my acoustics. It only cost me $99 at Bed Bath & Beyond, and it's a damn good investment, IMO.
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#7
Quote by Chad48309
Agreed. With a guitar of this value, I'd invest in a humidification system. During these cold, dry months, I actually own a humidifier that keeps my room at 50% humidity. Not only does it help me breathe easier, but it's good for my acoustics. It only cost me $99 at Bed Bath & Beyond, and it's a damn good investment, IMO.



Sheesh!! I just bought a "dampit" for my guitar, and a humidifier for my room. The humi cost me about 30$, and its keeping my room at hella nice humidity. The dampit sits inside my guitar, with a plastic covering over my soundhole, also quite nice. Between the 2, i spent about 50$ tops. Go to wal-mart, and get a humidifier, they're cheap, and they work well.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
Say what? I think you mean too little humidity. Too dry of conditions will eventually lead to cracks, not too moist. What's easier to break, an old dried out stick laying on the ground for a few years, or a freshly cut branch from a tree?

To threadstarter, a professional luthier may be able to fix it, but it'll cost you. Repairs of this sort are generally very time consuming. Sometimes the guitar needs to be taken apart in order to do it. The wood will have to be brought back to correct moisture levels as well if the fix is to take. And, after repairs, the guitar needs to be kept at the correct humidity levels at all times. Best of luck to you.


Ha yeah, but still. It was a humidity problem. To much humidity can still crack a guitar like that. if the wood expands it will crack and yes..if its too dry it will shrink and crack. I was just saying that becuase my friend left his guitar in his humid basement and the same thing happend.. and crack going with the grain, because it was too humid.
Guitars.

Seagull Entourage Rustic Q1
Washburn D-10 N 93'
Jay turser.. i dunno what model.