#1
I'm learning to improvise, by doing these 2 things:
1.Running up and down blues/pentonic scales(its more mixed up than just running up and down them) and throwing in extra notes occasionally.
2.Finding a note, anchoring my index finger there, and playing the surrounding notes (like in the GW blues column this month), and switching notes based on the rythymn guitars chords.
Is this how I should be doing it? If not how should I? I playing blues/classic rockish solos with this, and using a few other scales. And also, what key is Purple Haze in, and what scale should I use to improvise a solo for it? Or should I anchor, and play the surrounding notes? Or once again, do something else? Thanks a ton!
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.


#2
Improvising really shouldnt be constrained, there's no right or wrong way really, just do whatever sounds good.
Blues scales do help and the anchoring thing is a good technique, just dont be afraid to experiment and go outside the box.

For the question as to what key Purple Haze is in, I think it's primarily in E, so an E blues scale will work fine, I think Hendrix throws in a little Mixolydian in but an E blues/pentatonic/minor scale should work fine.
#3
as long as you're connecting the different scales with the identical note, and staying on key, i think you should be fine. as for purple haze, it's in the key of G major. im not sure what scale to improv on it but maybe try the G pentatonic i guess, playing it on two octaves
Anyone who thinks that music these days is dead doesn't listen to enough music.
#4
Hmm, well G major is the relative major of Em so an Em pentatonic will work.
You could mix in G major as well as Em though to spice it up a bit.
(Y)
#6
Thanks for all of these, they're all useful. Is there anything like that improvising thread on just solo's in general?
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.


#7
Here's something that can sound cool in a minor key:

When ending a solo, end on a sustained b3 note, preferably in the high register. This is the root note of the relative major key, so not only does it give closure AND tension to your ending, it's the perfect point at which to enter the next part of the song.

Remember that slides and legato open up lots of melodic options. Learn the different positions of the scales so you can use these to their full potential. If you find a melody that you like, repeat it using octaves and different dynamics to keep a recognisable theme going while keeping it interesting.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#8
Quote by mydogpoops
Thanks for all of these, they're all useful. Is there anything like that improvising thread on just solo's in general?

Not that i know of. The only other thread that talks about soloing is the one i always post about mode usage.

If you haven't seen 'melodic control' with marty friedman you might want to look that up. It focuses a lot on soloing.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
One of the easiest ways to expand that knowledge is to learn all 5 major and minor pentatonic boxes. I think there are five boxes of the blues scale as well, so those work nicely. In addition, varying the rhythm can help; when I improvise, I throw a few triplets, quintuplets or septuplets here and there-- this sounds much more itneresting to the listener than standard rhythmic patterns.

If you want another scale, I'd suggest either the harmonic minor (#7) or the Japanese pentatonic (1-b2-4-5-b6)-- I find either one to be very useful. Hope this helped.
#10
Yeah, the rythymn is one of the things I'm best at, since I started music as a percussionist in my school band. Will I be fine as long as I stay in the right key, or do I need to stick to a scale? And thanks a lot, every response has helped.
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.


#11
Oh yeah and how do I find what notes are in what key? Is there a lesson that would tell me, or is the circle of fiths how you do it(I have something on that).
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.


#12
Yeah, the circle of fifths.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#13
Ok, thanks.
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.


#14
learn the major scale, the penatonics are just major scales missing alot of notes. Blues scale is different though
#15
I've known the major scale since before I picked up the guitar. And actually, the minor pentonic isn't based on the major scale, who guessed? Wow, I sound like an asshole.
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.