#1
I've recently repainted a guitar, and I've put lacquer on it but it's not thick enough. What could I put on that won't leave massive brush marks, and will be thick enough not to damage too easily?

Cheers

Filth
#3
Quote by Demonikk
Spray lacquer?


Yeah, that's what I've used and it's really thin.
#4
The way I do furnature is thin coats of clear, sand, another coat or two, sand. For the final coat, I apply it heavier with the piece laying flat so I do not get any sags or runs.

On pieces I want to have really shiny, I just put more undercoats with more sanding and build the finish up. Patients is the key for me .

I have some columns I did in my living room and they have no less than 30 coats that I applied over a two week period.

Chris
Last edited by RCShadow at Dec 2, 2007,
#5
Quote by RCShadow
The way I do furnature is thin coats of clear, sand, another coat or two, sand. For the final coat, I apply it heavier with the piece laying flat so I do not get any sags or runs.

On pieces I want to have really shiny, I just put more undercoats with more sanding and build the finish up. Patients is the key for me .

I have some columns I did in my living room and they have no less than 30 coats that I applied over a two week period.

Chris


So, you think if I just keep going with lacquer, it'll be alright?

And this is the stuff I'm using, am I doing it right?

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#6
Quote by filthandfury
So, you think if I just keep going with lacquer, it'll be alright?

And this is the stuff I'm using, am I doing it right?

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Same clearcoat I use xD
Build up lots of coats. For a really high gloss finish, you'll want to use several cans and then get rid of any orange-peel or runs.
http://www.stewmac.com/tradesecrets/bridge_body/electric/tsblueguitar/blue_guitar01.html
Stewmac go through the process on that walkthrough... stage 4 and onwards I believe.
#7
Quote by even_flow
Same clearcoat I use xD
Build up lots of coats. For a really high gloss finish, you'll want to use several cans and then get rid of any orange-peel or runs.
http://www.stewmac.com/tradesecrets/bridge_body/electric/tsblueguitar/blue_guitar01.html
Stewmac go through the process on that walkthrough... stage 4 and onwards I believe.


Excellent, cheers mate.
#8
^--- Yep to the above Stewmac web site. Fairly good procedure that.

Once you get it done, you should have a smooth flat finish. When you run your fingers over the finished product, you shouldn't feel any bumps and such just a smooth surface.

If you do feel something, you have more sanding and spraying to do. With can spraying, you may get some "over-spray" because the can tends to "spit" leaving small drops. In that case, just do the best as you can. Again, be patient with yourself. A clear coat is one of the toughest finishes you can do if it is your first project.

Here is a pic of one of my columns...

Hope this help and good luck to you

Chris
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