#1
ok i think i get the basics of naming intervals and stuff but one thing im not sure about is when your have an accidental involved like

A to B is a minor second right?

A to B# would be an augmented second? (not sure)

but then my real problem comes when its like

Ab to C is that a diminished third?


or do i have everything wrong?
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#2
A to B is a major second
A to Bb is a minor second
A to B# is an augment second
A to C the a minor third
Ab to C is a major third
#3
yeah, unfortunately you have it all wrong! sorry.

it is all covered in the FAQ sticky.

A to B is a major second.

Seconds are minor or major
Thirds are Minor or Major
Fourths are Perfect or Augmented
Fifths are Diminished Perfect or Augmented
Sixths are Minor or Major
Sevenths are Minor or Major
i think a read of the sticky is in order
Last edited by branny1982 at Dec 2, 2007,
#4
In the key of Ab, there are four flats - Bb, Eb, Ab, and Db

So Ab to C is a major third - another way of looking at it is that a major third is always four semitones.
You can apply that to the others, which are wrong as well I'm afraid.
#5
wow lol, looking over my first post (i was kinda rushed) just putting random letters... wouldve been easier if i didnt put B#
<_<
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#7
so diminished intervals only apply to perfect intervals thats been lowered a half step?
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#9
^yes im pretty sure, it was by accidnet that i did something like that, i was just throwing out letters...

now i think im confused on like minor and major thirds... so is a minor third just one half step less than a major third?
and are 4ths 5ths and octaves always perfect? and can all intervals be augmented or diminished?
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
Last edited by C.C. Deville at Dec 2, 2007,
#10
Quote by C.C. Deville
so diminished intervals only apply to perfect intervals thats been lowered a half step?


you can augment any interval and can diminish any interval except a unison

C Ebb diminished third
C Eb minor third
C E major third
C E# augmented third

C Gb diminished fifth
C G perfect fifth
C G# augmented fifth

Quote by Punkismygod
is b# a c?


enharmonically yes, but it depends on the context

from wikipedia:
the notes C♯ (C sharp) and D♭ (D flat) are enharmonically equivalent - that is, they are represented by the same key (on a musical keyboard, for example), and thus are identical in pitch, although they have different names and diatonic functionality.
Last edited by seljer at Dec 2, 2007,
#11
Quote by seljer
you can augment any interval and can diminish any interval except a unison

C Ebb diminished third
C Eb minor third
C E major third
C E# augmented third

C Gb diminished fifth
C G perfect fifth
C G# augmented fifth


enharmonically yes, but it depends on the context

so then why couldnt C Eb be a diminished third? X(
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#12
Quote by Punkismygod
is b# a c?

They're enharmonic, in other words, they're the same pitch, and sound the same. In most situations, it will be called a C. However, on some occasions, like if you add it to a chord that already contains a C#, it would be correct to call it a B#, no matter how stupid it sounds.
#13
Quote by C.C. Deville
so then why couldnt C Eb be a diminished third? X(

C to Eb is 3 halfsteps, which is a minor third
C to E is 4 halfsteps which a major third
C and Ebb are 2 halfsteps apart, which would be a major second if it was C D, but since its C to E its a third and a diminished one
#14
im still confused about that seljier
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#15
it is best to learn intervals this way-
In half steps (one fret)-

Root
Minor Second
Major Second
Minor Third
Major Third
Perfect Fourth
Diminished Fifth
Perfect Fifth
Minor Sixth
Major Sixth
Minor Seventh
Major Seventh
Octave

Repeat

there are obviously situations where a b5 would be known as a #4, but in my opinion you need to learn the above exhaustively... then worry about more advanced intervals

#16
Figuring out intervals is easy. Just take the major scale of the root note. If the second note is part of the root's major scale then you know it's a major interval. Then all you have to do it count, starting on the root and ending on the second note.

With practice you'll get a lot faster at naming them.
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#17
Quote by C.C. Deville
im still confused about that seljier


It's like this: C up to Eb is three half steps, which is a minor third.

A diminished interval is simply a minor interval taken down a half step. Ebb would be Eb taken down one more step, so therefore it is a diminished third.

Enharmonically speaking, Ebb and D are the same thing, but because you've flatted the Eb it becomes diminished.

Does that help at all?
#18
If you lower or raise a perfect interval by a semitone, it's diminished or augmented respectively. But if you do the same to a major interval, it becomes minor or augmented. However you can make a diminished interval from a major one by flattening it twice. Since B flat is written Bb, for example, B double flat is written Bbb. It is also enharmonic to A natural.

A diminished interval will always be enharmonic to another interval but as long as it's written with the correct letter name it will be a diminished interval rather than a major one or whatever.
For example, C to Bbb is a diminished 7th, whereas C to A is a major 6th.

EDIT: I think someone else wrote this while I was typing.
Last edited by TheNthDimension at Dec 2, 2007,