#1
Hey guys, i'm learning about the way chords are structured at the moment but i've gotten confused.

According to my notes a Major chord is a 1st 3rd and a 5th, which by my reckoning would be a B, D# and F#.

which i think would be :

||-------
||---4---
||---X---
||---4---
||---2---
||-------


but a lot of sites i've looked at do it like :

||---2----
||---4---
||---4---
||---4---
||---2---
||-------


so are they just adding the extra B and F# notes to make it sound thicker?
if so is it technically a B major if they have added extra notes in?
#2
Quote by thesimo
so are they just adding the extra B and F# notes to make it sound thicker?


right

Quote by thesimo
if so is it technically a B major if they have added extra notes in?


nope, its a major chord cause it has a major 3rd. with a minor third it would have been a minor chord
#3
the second one is a b major barre chord but i play b major open chord like
2
4
4
4
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#4
Still B major because the added notes are still Bs, D#s and F#s, just on different octaves. Any chord with B, D# and F# notes (and nothing else) is a B major chord; the order, location etc. doesn't matter.
#5
Quote by swinghead

its a major chord cause it has a major 3rd. with a minor third it would have been a minor chord


so as long as you have that 3rd (as apposed to a flat third) in there, its a major chord of some kind, no matter what?
#6
Quote by thesimo
so as long as you have that 3rd (as apposed to a flat third) in there, its a major chord of some kind, no matter what?


Yep.
#8
its that the difference between a minor and a major chord is given by the 3rd.

in our case the major third is D# so this is the major B chord
||-------
||---4---
||---4---
||---4---
||---2---
||-------

and this is the minor B chord cause the minor 3rd of B is D
||-------
||---3---
||---4---
||---4---
||---2---
||-------
#9
I'll give you major props for taking theory seriously so early on in your playing. You're gonna get great benefits from it, in every area of music!
#10
Quote by swinghead
its that the difference between a minor and a major chord is given by the 3rd.

in our case the major third is D# so this is the major B chord
||-------
||---4---
||---4---
||---4---
||---2---
||-------

and this is the minor B chord cause the minor 3rd of B is D
||-------
||---3---
||---4---
||---4---
||---2---
||-------


thanks, just tried it there, the minor definitely sounds sad
#11
On the guitar, notes are often repeated, because it's often easier to fret a note rather than to mute it, and as you said, it makes them sound thicker. Also note that the B chord shape you posted (actually both of them) can be moved up and down the fretboard to make different chords - move it one fret up (x35553) and you'll have a C major. Move it one fret down (x13331) and you'll have a Bb major. Move it two frets down, and you have the open A major chord. Same goes for the minor chord posted here as well.
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