#1
I am working on trying to "refinish" my father-in-law's 1967 telecaster as a Christmas gift. I am not doing anything to the wood, besides cleaning, but I'm replacing all of the chrome parts with new ones, including the bridge, switch, knobs, all screws, tuning heads.

One area I'm having trouble with is the frets. I don't want to replace the neck, but the frets are all corroded and feel very rough, which I think will affect the playability. I've considered sanding them, but I'm afraid they'll be too low when I remove the corrosion. Is there a polish or something I could use to clean them up?

Also, can anyone recommend a good cleaner for chrome? I'm having trouble finding all of the replacement parts I need, so I may just try to clean anything I can't replace.

Thanks!
#2
Please don't suck the value out of that guitar by replacing everything.

You should be able to use some fine steel wool (make sure to protect the wood) to get the corrosion off the frets without grinding them down.

As far as cleaning the chrome, try an automotive grade chrome polish.
Hi, I'm Peter
#3
Quote by Dirk Gently
Please don't suck the value out of that guitar by replacing everything.


+1
#4
If your uncle is a guitar player, I doubt he wants you to replace the stuff on his guitar. but if he does, steel wool is good.
#5
I am working on trying to "refinish" my father-in-law's 1967 telecaster as a Christmas gift. I am not doing anything to the wood, besides cleaning, but I'm replacing all of the chrome parts with new ones, including the bridge, switch, knobs, all screws, tuning heads.
That's a really nice thought, but will harm the value of the guitar by, at a guess, $1000...

Everything that works okay, leave it on. As for the frets, clean them carefully with some 000 or preferably 0000 steel wool. Make a template from a piece of cardboard or plastic with a fret-sized slit in it, so you don't scratch the fretboard. Maybe use a bit of oil on the fingerboard too, and use a microfibre cloth or chamois leather for polishing so you don't scratch the finish.
#6
I'm pretty sure the metal parts are nickel plated. They started with chrome during later years, I believe.

Also, don't replace anything that doesn't desperately need replacement.
#7
Please do not de-value a 67 tele, the only reason to replace something is if it was broken.
#8
please do not refinish it or change the parts unless they are broken, it will de-value it so much, unless its already not completely orginal
POST FINDER
#9
Wow. I appreciate the advice. I'm certainly keeping everything that comes off the guitar, but I thought that the important things to keep are all of the wood parts and the pickups. I'm also keeping the same pickguard, it cleaned up easily. I should note that this guitar has probably not been out of its case for a good 20 years, but was used to gig with in the late 60's and 70's and took quite a bit of abuse. I don't consider the guitar to be "playable" in its present state.

You're telling me that replacing a corroded switch with a new, vintage style selector switch would harm the value of the guitar?

Replacing the tone and volume knobs with identical, but nice and shiny new knobs, will lower the value?

Replacing the switch plate with an identical piece, but without all of the rust, would devalue the guitar?

Replacing the input jack cover with an identical cover, but without all the corrosion, will devalue the guitar?

Replacing the strap buttons with vintage-style, new strap buttons would devalue the guitar?

Replacing the bridge with a vintage style bridge, but without all of the rust, will lower the value?

Replacing the rusty pick guard screws with new screws will lower the value?

I ask these questions legitimately, not sarcastically. It seemed like common sense that you should keep any part of the guitar that is not ruined. But all of the parts that are ruined should be replaced.
#10
Yes.

There are a lot of people out there who are guitar collectors and look for vintage instruments. Some of them will throw a wobbly if it's something as tiny as a single screw being changed. And yes, I am being serious.
#11
IF you plan on selling the guitar then it would be an issue. Collectors can be anal about even simple parts replacement. But if your just going to play it and not get rid of it then do what ever you want. I guess you could always sell it and use the cash to get a new guitar.
#12
Thanks. Like I said, I am keeping all of the rusty stuff I remove, so technically it could all be put back on later. But I want the guitar to be enjoyed, too. Some day this guitar will be mine, and I would never consider selling it.
#13
Hmm. If that is the case, then I can see no reason for doing it as long as you:

A) Keep all the original parts and make sure they are kept safely.
B) Don't do anything that would permanently alter the guitar (such as drilling or routing).
C) Don't repaint it.