#1
Hello!

ive been playing for nearly six years, but the last year has been very slow. in fact, ive probably played a total of 10 hours in the last six months. there is no motivation there. i enjoy listening to music, but no longer have the urge to play it myself.

i never considered myself a musician or even an guitar player. i was just a guy who played guitar. i was pretty decent at playing songs from my favourite bands and really put a lot of effort into learning and even perfecting some of them. but there was never the urge to write songs, never the urge to produce music. sure, ive enjoyed playing with other people, jamming a little, but ive never really taken interest in playing in a band. never wanted to perform. ive tried playing in bands but it always failed. ive tried writing my own songs, and some were rather decent but it was nothing fascinated me. nothing i really enjoyed doing.

ive always told myself that id quit when i lose interest and stop having fun. and its happened. ive got equipment for 1500€ sitting around and im asking myself if i should really give up and sell it. quit playing guitar. i never thought i would, but it seems like i dont enjoy it anymore. what would you do? wait? try again? sell it and move on? cause theres plenty of hobbies that i engage in with a passion. unlike guitar.
#2
dont... youll regret it!
i tried that... i had to but more gear.instead try learning more songs and watch some reali guitarish stuff....for example google impossible guitar... then tell yourself you can be as good as they are if you set your mind to it.... then do!
Quote by chs170
Quote by Carl6661
Quote by chs170
Wow.

This is deep
.
Was the pun intended?
Actually no

E-married to Nikki82
#3
Well, it depends. I myself used to sing for a pop-punk band, and was losing interest quickly. It was just that I never liked that kind of music. When I got into playing guitar in a hardcore/deathcore band, my music interest went way up. Try different music styles, or instruments. Music is fun, don't waste what you've learned.
#4
If getting into different styles doesn't work, go ahead and quit but don't sell your gear because it's entirely possible that you'll want to pick it up again sometime in the future.
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Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#5
yeah, try a different style or genre. also, maybe pick up another instrument and you might come back to guitar.
#6
what always helped me was watching movies of great guitar players on youtube or live concerts or DVD shows or whatever. if u have free time watch a quick video of somebody tearing it up, then pick up your guitar and get to it. what helped me is not forcing myself to play, but instead trick myself into wanting it, like watching jimmy page play since i been lovin you, or mustaine rip mechanix.... it usually gives you enough encouragement to practice for a day or two, then when its gone watch movies of other people. just keep at it, thats all.
DONT sell the gear, you WILL regret it
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Ibanez RG550

Vox AD30VT
#7
anytime i get to where i dont play a lot or get to feeling where i may want to quit, I usually buy a new gadget and BAM back into it full swing. Just bought a digitech gnx3 off the "bay" I play every night again.
Gear;
Ibanez AF75
Takamine EG550
Digitech gnx3
Peavey Classic 50
#8
the thing is i dont want to play anymore. im happy just listening to music. ive had my lows where i wasnt that motivated to play and i did the same thing as you guys describe. i bought gear, i watched videos, i bought new cds. but i dont want to play anymore. for half a year there has been no urge at all to play the guitar. what for? all i do is play covers and theres not even anyone to see my progress.
Last edited by 2slick2 at Dec 3, 2007,
#9
Get in a band. It's the best thing. Theres no use in playing guitar for yourself. You'll get bored. When you're in a band you get to write your own stuff, and share influences with people. Bands are the funnest things to do with your instrument, try it out before selling all your stuff.
#10
Hey 2slick2 -

A person should do something because they have a passion for it. Everyone should do something they have a passion for. Whatever this is, should be something active - not just listening to music, watching TV or playing video games! Some are even lucky enough to be able to turn their passion into their income-producer.

Whatever the thing is the person has passion for, makes them a better, richer person. Whether it's playing an instrument, skiing, arts & crafts, writing, etc., it's all good as long as you have something.

If you have lost interest in guitar because you have gained interested in something else you want to pursue, go for it. However, if you don't have a replacement passion-thing to continue making you into a better, richer person, then stick with guitar and set yourself some measurable goals that may help reignite your passion. Manic and hurricane have good ideas for that above.

Manic is also right about the regret. I have technically been playing guitar for over 25 years. Unfortunately, there was a heavy year or two when I was 15 and wanted to be a rock star and then pretty much nothing until a couple of months ago. I bought my second guitar, an Aria Pro II when I was 25 and jammed with some friends exactly once. When I was 30, I added a Yamaha 12-string to the herd and diddled it a little bit. In the last five years, I added a Gibson Les Paul, a Gibson SG and a Marshall stack. (I always wanted a Marshall stack! ) Still no real playing...

I recently noticed an advertisement for a special a local guitar teacher was having. I called him and set up lessons. As it turns out, the guy is a jazz virtuoso, has turned me on to playing some amazing jazz stuff and I have found the passion for guitar I had a long time ago when I was 15. I'll never be a rock star and that's ok.

The regret is that the 25-year 'pause' in my playing probably means I'll never be as good as I could have been.

Quitting guitar is a big decision - especially if you have achieved some level of ability. Don't be hasty about it. Besides the ideas above, maybe lessons are just the thing for you - set up a meeting with a teacher, show them what you already know and ask them where they think you should go from there. From my playing as a teenager, I already knew most major and minor chords and barre chords. However, I was a near-0 as far as reading music and playing melodies while sight-reading music on a ledger. So, my teacher is working with me on an intermediate level with chords doing all kinds of 11ths, 13ths, 9ths and other crazy stuff but he's working with me on a novice level out of an Alfred's book on the music / melody stuff.

I have found so much challenge in this that I can't help being totally jazzed about it. I made a point of playing so much the first couple of weeks that my callouses came back immediately. I invested in having my Les Paul professionally set up so I so l have the obstacle of difficult action eliminated.

Good luck with your decision!
#11
Quote by 2slick2
the thing is i dont want to play anymore. im happy just listening to music. ive had my lows where i wasnt that motivated to play and i did the same thing as you guys describe. i bought gear, i watched videos, i bought new cds. but i dont want to play anymore. for half a year there has been no urge at all to play the guitar. what for? all i do is play covers and theres not even anyone to see my progress.

Sounds like you've done some soul searching.

Music is communication, and if there is no one
to acknowledge you, well....

But dude, you have to create those people in your life.

Have you checked out Craigslist for local musicians?
I guarantee the people are out there.

It isn't easy, but that might just be the shot in the arm you need.

Good luck.
#13
Thanks for taking the time to write that long post. I am not in financial need right now and my equipment wont decrease drastically in value...so maybe i should just keep it for now. maybe ill feel the need to play some notes in the future. right now i already have another extremely fulfilling hobby which is longboarding.
#15
Quote by 2slick2
Thanks for taking the time to write that long post. I am not in financial need right now and my equipment wont decrease drastically in value...so maybe i should just keep it for now. maybe ill feel the need to play some notes in the future. right now i already have another extremely fulfilling hobby which is longboarding.

I think that sounds like a plan. Keeping your equipment is a good idea since you'll only get 50% of its value on the used market. And then if you want to play again, you'll get to pay 100% again!

Good luck longboarding! Don't hurt yourself! Mahalo brah...
#16
My advice is to take the decision very seriously. If you've really decided that guitar isn't for you, at least keep one guitar (acoustics are easy to pick up, but I'm biased...). You never know when you'll want to pick it up and pluck around a bit.


Slurgi
#18
My £2000 Gibson Les Paul sat virtually unplayed for 8 years as I went through a long period of inactivity in guitar playing. I never really thought about selling it but I often felt it was a shame that such a nice guitar was being wasted.

Finally I started playing again and now play more that I ever did. The best decision I never made was to sell my LP.

Whatever you do keep your kit. One day you might just find yourself sitting around the house and think "hmmm, maybe I'll play a little guitar". Then slowly the love of playing can come back. You can't do that if you don't have a guitar.

I felt exactly like you did, I no longer had any real interest in playing even though I still loved music. This lasted 8 long years but my mojo came back eventually and now I can't even begin to imagine being without the guitar.
#19
Try playing in a band.
My guitaring is picking up because i'm starting a band. Got a drummer, bassist and today, i had a jam with another guitarist who was pathetic as hell, but when he got this one part right and we were doing harmonies, it was amazing and i know its what i wanna do.

So try playign with other musicians. That should reignite your passion
#20
if you don't want to play guitar anymore, don't play guitar. if you ever get the desire to play again, then start playing again. if you don't, then don't.

seems like an easy solution to me.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#21
i stopped playing and sold my gear which soon made me realize that it was a dumb ass idea
then i got some new equipment again...i mean i was kinda like you, unsure that i wanted to do it anymore and as soon as i got another guitar it was, like, i KNEW i would never stop playing ever again.
#22
I took a break from playing about 15 years ago. I sold almost all my gear and didn't play for probably 2 years. I don't remember what happened. I think it was a song I couldn't get out of my head and had to play it. I was hooked again. It's been well more than a dozen years since and I'm still playing and in a metal band. Writing music I love and enjoying the **** out of playing guitar. However the only difference here is that I was intersted in playing and being in a band for quite a while before I up and quit.
#23
Yeah, I'd say this is typical. I stopped playing for about 8 years, but I eventually
came back to it. Since most on these boards are in the teens, this is most likely
where the vast majority will end up.

This is why I harp on learning how to practice if you want to stick with guitar for
any length of time. The early years are the EASY ones. You can have your fling
with guitar and have fun and make progress. But there comes a time where that's
no longer sufficient. At this critical juncture you either decide to get serious about
practice or quit. Ulitimately the fun in guitar is making progress and its nearly
impossible at some point without practice skill.

It seems even worse nowadays with all the internet tabbing -- people play for years
and don't even know what a scale is or why they're even useful. You can't expect
to have a long-term relationship with the guitar if you're not the least bit interested
in how playing music on it really works.

So, TS, most likely your underlying motives for playing guitar no longer suit you.
You still might want to keep your stuff. You can always come back to it.
#24
I'm in my seventh year. I didn't really start getting serious about learning the guitar untill the last couple years. I don't really know too much theory, I can get by basically. I can however pretty much play whatever I want though from Althea to Mast of Puppets. I go through phases though where I conentrate on different styles of music. This is what has kept my interested and motivated to play every day. I've gone through a metal phase, a classic rock phase, a bluegrass phase, a country phase, a jazz phase, I've always played and loved the blues, I am currently deep in a grateful dead/jam band/jazz phase. It keeps it interesting, keeps your mind open to new ideas and pathways.
Do not concentrate on the finger for you will miss all the heavenly glory.
#25
If it were me, I'd probably take a six month break and then see if you wanted to quit or not. If your gear is easily replaced I would sell it at that time and move on. There's no law that says you have to play guitar. I myself took a ten year break, from 1997 to 2007. Looking back I wish I could have stuck with it, but life intruded and I wasn't motivated. But now I have a clear idea of what I want to learn and how to learn it. Guitar is a blast riow and I won't quit ever again.