#1
I'm pretty lost. I love blues, classic rock, jam, and blues/rock. So I really want to play blues and bluesy rock jam type of stuff like Govt Mule or Cream. I get lost though. I don't quite know what scales to learn and what key I should try out. I know an A Minor pentatonic and I think that's it. I just don't know where to go. Especially with the scale I know. How do I make something that resembles a solo? How do I know where to go? Someone please point me in the right direction. I can't really find any websites. The only ones I can find teach you how to play 20000 notes a second and I don't want to do that kind of stuff. I've found a few blues sites but it goes way too into theory and it just goes way over my head. So can anyone please help me out? Someone please tell me what to do where to go what scales I should learn what I can do anything that'll point me in the right direction.

Thanks
#2
just keep learning song by your favorite bands and learn how to play in the minor pentatonic and you'll be fine
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#3
A musicians greatest instrument is his ear. Use it. Sod modes and scales. However learn your major one. That will help. Then (once learned PROPERLY) you can play 80% of all music if not more.
#4
Do you want to learn theory? If you do we can point you in the right direction.

On the other hand, if you just want to know what scale you should learn that will magically help you play the blues then i can't help you out.
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#6
Don't even think about scales. those are for styles that have an annoying emphasis on technique. you think anyone from Robert Johnson to SRV gave a s**t about scales? But yeah, just keep listening and you'll feel it. you have good taste in music! don't give up. you will be a better player if you can truly improvise rather than think about where you are on the fretboard.
#7
Learn your major/minor pentatonic blues scales I'd say. Remember that they follow the same pattern in every key, they just start in a different place. For example the E and A strings for a minor blues pattern in A would look like:

E -----5 6 7 --- (etc etc...)
A -5-8----------

But to play in B, simply slide two frets up the neck so that the pattern starts on B(7) instead of A(5) like this:

E -------7 8 9 --- (etc etc...)
A -7-10----------

My advice is to learn the patterns that scales create in general instead of having the specific key in your mind. As you learn the patterns and begin to recognize where all of the A/A#/B/C...etc etc are on the guitar you will be able to start to piece solos together.

Just remember to start slow and really work on your form/note choice above all else. Speed should be the last thing on your mind. You need to form a strong foundation before you can build the rest otherwise your solos will just end up being muddy/sloppy/crappy things.
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#8
one in thing blues: don't stick strictly to scales but use passing tones and such (in other words notes that don't fit in the scale)
In A minor pentatonic add in a 6th fret G string (or A string) and it add some more bluesyness to it.

Just take A minor pentatonic and start it at the 10th fret instead of the 5th and it's D minor pentatonic because the 10th fret of the E string is D! Put the scale anywhere you want.

Look up solos to bands you like. Try Sunshine of your love or something
#9
dude i was in the same situation but my buddy taught me the pentatonic scales, if you wanna play something that reassembles a solo, then just put on a song, and just improvise over the pentatonic, and if when you master the pentatonic, it won't be hard to learn the blues scale, you just have to add one single note and voila there is blues scale, just concentrate on your pentatonics for the moment, they will really help, so just look up the positions for the pentatonic scale on UG's lesson part and good luck
#10
Thank You All For Your Help. But I don't mean I don't want to learn anything that relates to music theory but I just don't want to be engulfed by it. I always think to myself Robert Johnson and Howlin' Wolf probably didn't know any scales but that didn't limit them I just don't know any other way because that's all I see people around me doing except they're leaning more towards metal. I enjoy only a handful of it. I just don't know how to learn blues guitar. I have no means of learning. It it puts me off when I hear Warren Haynes and Clapton jamming I just pisses me off that I don't know how to do that and at the same time it inspires me.
#11
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

I'd start learning intervals. Once you learn intervals you can understand how scales work, how they're made, how chords are made, how scales go over chords, etc.

Once you understand how that stuff works you can start putting everything together so you can improvise like all your heroes.

If you have any questions about intervals, scales, or theory in general don't be afraid to ask. Everyone started somewhere.
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#12
Quote by Who66
Don't even think about scales. those are for styles that have an annoying emphasis on technique. you think anyone from Robert Johnson to SRV gave a s**t about scales? But yeah, just keep listening and you'll feel it. you have good taste in music! don't give up. you will be a better player if you can truly improvise rather than think about where you are on the fretboard.

Don't be such a mong. Whether SRV or Robert Johnson thought about scales isn't the point, the point is that they used them. If you want to understand their work properly and learn as much as is possible from it then you need to know what it's based around ie the minor pentatonic and blues scales.
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#13
Quote by fattypumbaa
Thank You All For Your Help. But I don't mean I don't want to learn anything that relates to music theory but I just don't want to be engulfed by it. I always think to myself Robert Johnson and Howlin' Wolf probably didn't know any scales but that didn't limit them I just don't know any other way because that's all I see people around me doing except they're leaning more towards metal. I enjoy only a handful of it. I just don't know how to learn blues guitar. I have no means of learning. It it puts me off when I hear Warren Haynes and Clapton jamming I just pisses me off that I don't know how to do that and at the same time it inspires me.


The thing is, you don't need to know a hell of a lot of theory to play blues, but you
should know at least *some* so you can at least navigate the fretboard and have
some clue what people are talking about.

You said you know "A minor pentatonic" and that's about it. You can't really have
even a basic conversation about blues without a minimal understanding of a key and
scale and why, if you know the pentatonic in A, you can easily play it in any other
key.

You don't need to be overwhelmed by theory, but you do need to spend a little time
on the basics.
#14
Well it's not just soloing.What about what chords to use and turnarounds. Where the hell can I find turnarounds? I always hear of people learning as many as they can and I can't find any. I only know 2.
#15
you might want to get the "beginning blues guitar" book by National Guitar Workship Method. My teacher gave it to me, and I like it quite a bit. It deals with blues theory, blues techniques, rhythm guitar, intros/turnarounds/endings, and improvising. there are also "intermediate" and "advanced" blues books in the same series, but I haven't tried them. You can get the book and cd together for $20, which isn't really bad for an instructional book and cd. You can also get the book by itself for $10.