#1
So basically, I've been playing guitar for about two years now, and I'm kinda gettin sick of the same old scales. I already know pentatonic, natural and harmonic minor, and phrygian dominant. I also would like to learn some new types of arpeggios. I already know major, minor and diminished.

I would really appreciate it if you guys could tell me some new scales/modes and arpeggios I could incorporate into my playing for a more exotic sound. Another thing is I'd also really like to learn some new types of chord preogressions that don't sound so commonplace in music. I want to start incorporating more progressive elements in my music/playing.

Plus I'd really appreciate it if you guys were to rec me sme vids/ books/CDs that I could check out to expand my knowledge further.
#3
You should become familiar with all the modes now to add another level to your playing, in addition to just Phrygian. I personally am a fan of both Aeolian and the Lydian #5 as well.
#6
^ thanks guys, but does anyone have suggestions for more exotic scales/arpeggios?


learn intervals instead of scales. As soon as you think of playing 1 3 5 instead of a 'shape' you can easily modify those. If I want to play a minor you just flat the third in your 'shape'. If that flatted note is too low on the fretboard to play you simply use it's unison five frets down and vice versa.

If you want to know specific chords that fit a scale learn to harmonize scales. Know your double and triple stops for all the chords.

The last tidbit is don't get hung up on new scales. Focus on new rhythms and applying those to scales.
#8
Quote by capiCrimm

If you want to know specific chords that fit a scale learn to harmonize scales. Know your double and triple stops for all the chords.
.


Could you possibly explain or point me in a direction where I can learn how to harmonize scales, and what double and triple stops are?
#9
^harmony (or harmonizing) is when you play two notes at the same time. Normally people harmonize in fifths or diatonic thirds.
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#10
hirojoshi FTW!!!
Quote by Kensai
Girls don't have to do anything to be good in bed. If she's got a pulse she's automatically an 8.

#11
Hirojoshi is a pentatonic form of the natural minor scale. I believe the intervals are something like 1 2 b3 5 b6.

Just for the record, pentatonic means a five note scale, NOT necessarily the classic box position.
#12
^harmony (or harmonizing) is when you play two notes at the same time. Normally people harmonize in fifths or diatonic thirds.


different type of harmonizing. Harmonizing a scale, in my jargon, means to figure what chords fit into a scale.

For example if you start in Ionian mode of the major scale
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 (W-W-H-W-W-W-H)
and build a triad from that you'd have
1 3 5 (major)

if you shifted it to Dorian mode
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 (W-H-W-W-W-H-W)
and build a triad...
1 b3 5
... you'd have a minor chord. (Another way to look at this is what is the 2 4 6 of Ionian Mode)

It's not a definitive list of all chords you can play with a scale, but it does help you get an idea. It can also give you an idea of what chords define a mode.

and what double and triple stops are?


double and triple stops are just names for playing multiple notes at once(simple versions of chords). It comes from violin. Basically a 1-5 power chord is a double stop and a 1-5-1 is a triple stop. If you play the D chord without the open note you're playing a second inversion major chord(5-1-3), which is a triple stop.

I attached an image of all the triple stops for the three high strings. (it starts a fret 1 to 17 I think). The letter above it is the key of the mode. (G Ionian, A Dorian, B Phyrgian...) . G,C,D are major. A,B,E are minor, and F# is dim(you'd know that if you harmonized the major scale). You'll notice every mode has three inversions possible(since obviously, you only have one root note per string). The colors are for something else, this is a test format for a program I'm working on so I hope it doesn't confuse you. Not exactly the best thing for explaining this.
(note, if you look at D, you should be able to see the 'D shape' I mentioned above)


If this was all too confusing, as it may be, go look at "hendrix chords" or some of the old blues players. I'm not exactly the best at explaining this stuff.
Attachments:
G-sall2.jpg
Last edited by capiCrimm at Dec 7, 2007,
#13
Actually I understand everything completely. thanks a lot for this.
#14
Chords: Learn your 6th, 7th, 9th, 11, and 13 chords. Make sure you learn the notes and how they are constructed, and not just the shapes.


Here are the formulas for 7th chords;


Dominant 7 - R 3 5 b7
Major 7 - R 3 5 7
Minor 7 - R b3 5 b7
Major Minor 7 - R b3 5 7
Augmented 7 - R 3 #5
Half Diminished - R b3 b5 b7
Fully Diminished - R b3 b5 bb7(6)

Scales and Modes: Learn all Seven modes. Make sure you learn (like I said with Chords) the notes and how they are constructed. Make sure you know the intervallic structures.


Ionian
Dorian
Phyrgian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Aeolian ( you already know)
and Locrian.

Make sure you know which ones are minor and which ones are major.

Ionian (1st major)
Dorian (1st minor)
Phyrgian (2nd minor)
Lydian (2nd major)
Mixolydian (3rd major)
Aeolian (3rd minor)
Locrain (Half-diminished)

Make sure you know what kinds of chords to play over what kinds of scales. For example, the Mixolydian scale has a b7. The Dominant 7 chord has a b7 as well. So, the Dominant 7 chord and the Mixolydian scale would be a perfect match.

Make sure you know your relative major and minor relashonships.


I hope this helped a little. I'm sorry if you knew some of this stuff already.