#1
So yesterday we (my friend and I) started having a jam session. My bro on bass, and my friend on drums (he just got his set but he's been playing for a while and is pretty good). So what is an effective way to put clean soloing with bass and drums without it sounding all sloppy and what-the-hell-is-that-I-can't-tell-what-it-is-you're-playing.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#3
it'll sound fine as long as YOU lock in with the bassist and drummer. You should all agree on a key or a progression, and then you should let the bass and drums establish a groove. From there, you can just add solo parts wherever they fit. Try to use space, like find a spot where the beat/bass isn't playing, and play a sweet note of your own right there. You can play overtop of them too, but basically, keep the groove in mind. You can't just solo random blues and expect your tone to make it sound great.
#4
Yeah, I'll stay in a key (like E minor) and just play in the boxes, not playing all the time, but still keeping the groove. What about drums? How should they go?
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#5
Music and jamming is all about feel man. To get it perfect you have to feel the people you are playing with, and that takes time. That's what Jazz is all about.

But as you haven't been playing together for long, you can establish some plan where to build the dynamic, where to put it down a bit etc. Then you have some base where to improvise to and not just a random jam, i don't like planning my jams but often without, it will just sound boring and lifeless without, if i don't know the people too well.

Or just shout directions where to go from the spot. Or just let somebody lead the jam and go along with it. That's pretty much the feel thing i was talkin' bout.
My gear:

Schecter C-1 Classic
Squier Fat Strat Deluxe
Yamaha FG700 Acoustic
Old Nylonstrung Acoustic

Peavey Classic 50w 2/12
Roland Cube 30X
Roland Cube 60 (30~ years old)
Vox 847A Wah Pedal
Digitech Bad Monkey
Old Ibanez Rack Delay
#6
Quote by md41
So yesterday we (my friend and I) started having a jam session. My bro on bass, and my friend on drums (he just got his set but he's been playing for a while and is pretty good). So what is an effective way to put clean soloing with bass and drums without it sounding all sloppy and what-the-hell-is-that-I-can't-tell-what-it-is-you're-playing.


Dont play sloppy. Play something that is clear, so they can tell what you playing.

That may sound sarcastic, but its true. There is no trick, guidelines or rules to playing "clean guitar with bass and drums".... its no different than playing with distortion. Its just a different sound. Play with confidence.

If you play clean often, you must have a repetiore of licks that you can use, and should have the confidence you need to pull it off.

If you dont play clean often. Start listening to guys that do, and learn from them. or just turn the distortion back on.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 6, 2007,
#7
Quote by md41
Yeah, I'll stay in a key (like E minor) and just play in the boxes, not playing all the time, but still keeping the groove. What about drums? How should they go?

do yr self a favor and get out of the box:P
#8
Quote by md41
Yeah, I'll stay in a key (like E minor) and just play in the boxes, not playing all the time, but still keeping the groove. What about drums? How should they go?


it's not even necessarily about staying in the box... you should try to get out of the box if you can... basically, the way to sound good when you're jamming is to fit your phrases into bars... listen to the groove for a few bars, and pick a drum to follow... maybe for a few phrases, you try to fit in around the snare drum. Let the drum hit be part of your riff..., ie: don't necessarily play on the snare hit each time. play notes right before and right after it, so that you become part of the groove. And of course, you can change it up every few bars if you want. follow the snare for a few, the kick drum for a few.

drums themselves can sound however you want. for blues jamming, it's of course best not to have crazy-fast, super-intricate beats all the time. a simple shuffle or rock beat will suffice, and the drummer can add fills wherever. the trick to jamming live with a drummer is to LISTEN to the drummer at ALL TIMES, and react to the beat. You should start to get a feel for the drummer, and you'll know his tendencies, allowing you to change up on the fly to a different kind of riff or groove without stopping or talking about it. As long as you're both playing the same speed, and everyone has their ears open, it'll be all good.