#1
Hi,
I finished High School here in Portugal, and I would love to pursuit a studying career in music, probably focusing in drums, because that's what I ave played for longer and that's what I'm best at.
Of course I will be moving out of Portugal, because there's nothing of the sort here. Of course I considered Berklee, but it's just to expensive, and I hear they only give scholarships if you are really good.

So anyone knows about any affordable Music Colleges in the Uk, or even in the States? Germany might also be an option.
all the world's indeed a stage and we are merely players
Last edited by fexnah at Dec 7, 2007,
#4
Thank you, never heard of it.
all the world's indeed a stage and we are merely players
#6
A "music academy" might not be what you're looking for - many universities have large music faculties. While many are strictly classical (although you'll find that classical music these days is very open minded) many have excellent jazz programs.
#7
Quote by Nick_
A "music academy" might not be what you're looking for - many universities have large music faculties. While many are strictly classical (although you'll find that classical music these days is very open minded) many have excellent jazz programs.


+1


or try a college.
#8
Yes, I mean something that also focuses on Modern music, like Berklee.

Edited the title.
all the world's indeed a stage and we are merely players
#9
Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada has a world-renowned music program. Some of the greatest musicians in the world work as profs there.
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I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

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Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#10
I'll try not to come off as elitist, the problem with studying "contemporary" music is that it is normally "popular music" and not "art music"

The distinction (from Wikipedia): "The term primarily refers to classical traditions (including contemporary as well as historical classical music forms), focuses on formal styles, invitestechnical and detailed deconstruction and criticism, and demands focused attention from the listener"

Basically, music that can be intensely studied, rather than simply played.

It is my opinion that University/College is to expensive and time-consuming to spend trying to study music without enough depth (I don't mean that to offend) to do so; it would likely be better in that situation to pursue another path (part time studies in something real profitable? trades, or something - The average tradesman in his late 30s in Canada makes more than the same person with a B.A. or B.Mus ...) and continue private instruction and projects.

I'd compare it to taking a specialty English degree that focuses entirely on Tom Clancy's bibliography - there's only so much you can read into it. Sure, enjoy the books, but if you want to study literature, there are better choices. Just because you like the books doesn't mean studying literature formally is right for you.
#11
^There are people who enjoy the study of music (performance, composition, history, or even music therapy) enough to spend 4 or more years studying it under experienced and established musicians. Some people (I'm talking about myself) don't learn to make money, we learn to learn. When has knowledge and experience ever held anyone back?
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#12
I'm absolutely OK wth that - I just feel that with many styles of music (rock/metal/blues/pop/smooth jazz/etc) you're not getting your money's worth paying for a university degree in music, which, let's face it, is not a door-opening credential.

By all means, however, if music is what you want to pursue wholeheartedly - go ahead.
#13
There's Juliard in New York City.

Also, any college/university (at least in America, perhaps not in Europe) is going to have a music program. I know the Boyer Music School at Temple University (Philadelphia) has an excellent music program. You won't be able to only study music there, you'll have requirements in all the subjects (a lab science, some calculus, some literature, some history), but you can earn a BA in music. This will be true of any university, though I'm sure there are a few exceptions.