#1
I've been playing guitar every single day for the last two and a half years. I've used the cheap pawn shop guitars, to the crappy hand-me-down guitars. I used an old(and really crappy) Yamaha guitar for a year until it broke. I've never bought my own guitar.

My dream guitar has been a Gibson Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar, the white one to be exact. A thousand dollars is a lot of money; the most I've ever spent was $75. I walked into Guitar Center once and it was the first guitar I saw and I pointed it out to my girlfriend like a little kid in a candy shop. It's the guitar I want.

In April I'm getting $4,500 and for the last eight years I've had no idea on what I'd spend it on, until now. I want this guitar, and I want a decent sized amp. I'm not sure if I should do it, though. I'm not THAT great of a player; self-taught.. But, I just feel like I deserve this.. I've had to use these poor excuses for guitars for years and I feel this should be my pay off.

Should I do it? I'll have the money(and spending it won't mean I can't pay rent, it's money to be spent), I just don't know if I should buy something else for practice purposes.

I'm also very confused on which kind of amp I should get. I've heard things about stacks, tubes, and combos.. I have no clue on what I should be getting.

Thanks for your time.
#2
Well what style do you like to play?

And if you want to buy it then get it, it is a good guitar and will serve you well.
#3
if you have the money then buy, it would make more sense than spending more money of several different guitars, getting slightly better every time. You might as well go straight for a good one.
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#4
Ehhh. I don't have a definite style. I play everything except country and jazz, simply because I haven't looked into it yet. I guess I'm a hybrid when it comes to styles.
#5
Perhaps some type of Marshall will do you good, or if you have enough left over you can buy a Fender and some other High gain amp.
#6
i just wanna know how the hell you're coming into $4500...i would flip a tit if i had that right now
Member #3 of the Breaking Benjamin Fanclub PM Electric7 to join.
#7
If you have been playing every day for two years and absolutely love playing guitar, I'd say you should get it. Make sure it plays good before you buy it though.
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#8
Quote by pavel
i just wanna know how the hell you're coming into $4500...i would flip a tit if i had that right now


Terrible car accident when I was younger. The insuarance company put the money in a trust fund, and in April I'm finally able to get it out. I'm afraid of cars now, and I tense up whenever I go over 35. Pretty crappy, haha.

I was looking on guitarcenter.com and I saw a Marshal stacked amp for $600 that looked nice.
#9
Marshall stacked amp at $600 dollars? Thats gotta be a MG amp. Don't get those. If you go Marshall try to get one of there amps from the JCM or JVM series. You can find JCM's on ebay, as there discontinued I think.
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#11
id get the gibson, a good case, and either a mesa mark IV or a peavey jsx. then you could get like an overdrive, chorus, and a delay and you will be set. you might even be left with some extra money to do something nice with the gf. or if you dont have one, do something nice for yourself. lol
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#12
I know it looks nice an' all (I'm a big fan of the white finish myself), but my advice is, stay as far away from Studios as possible.

Despite claiming to be as good as any other LP on paper, in reality they are far, far inferior. The hardware is a cheaper cast; the pickups are much poorer; but most of all, is the poor body construction. Studios are, to put it very, very bluntly, made up of the hacked-up offcuts of lower grade mahogany. An Epiphone LP Standard that costs less than half the price, actually has a more 'correct' body than a Gibson Studio does. Incidently, The Gibson 'Faded' series also suffers from this problem.

If you're hell-bent on having 'Gibson' on the headstock, the only 'cheap' one worth bothering with is the Classic series; especially the Classic Antique, which tends to be cheaper than the straight Classic. They're exactly the same as the LP Standards, but with different pickups (note; this is not neciseriily a good or a bad thing - it just depends on what exact tone you're after), and slightly annoyingly, they have less finish and neck profile options than a Standard has.

If you're willing to swing the headstock though, you've got more, frankly better options; Epiphone's Elitist range are superior to Gibson's production models in every single way except for having different pickups (again - whether this is actually a good or a bad thing depends solely on your taste). They also don't suffer from the many quality control issues that the regular Epis suffer from. In most countries they're cheaper than any Gibson too, despite the better quality (with Gibson, you really do pay a huge premium just for that logo on the headstock). I don't know about America, but over here you can buy an Epiphone Elitist LP Custom in Alpine White (the same finish you mentioned the Studio having) for about £150 less than the Gibson Studio, Faded or Classics cost.

Then there's Tokai, ESP, Vintage, Edwards, Agile, all makers of very good high-end LP copies, amoung others.


Whatever you go with though, please please please, do not waste your money on that Studio. Yes, I know it looks gorgeous - I sucked myself into buying one once just because it looked so pretty. But they really are awful guitars. You really are far better off with either the Gibson Classic series or an Epiphone Elitist.
#13
With that kind of cash, look into Carvin guitars www.carvin.com. They have several different body styles to choose from (including Les Paul style), and the guitars are custom made to your specs; everything from the hardware to what color the lettering on the headstock is. They are also much cheaper and better quality than the current Gibsons.

As for your amp, I'd say a Mesa Mark IV. It has very good cleans, but can also do the most br00tal metal, and surprisingly does everything in between very well too.
#14
Quote by bokuho
I know it looks nice an' all (I'm a big fan of the white finish myself), but my advice is, stay as far away from Studios as possible.

Despite claiming to be as good as any other LP on paper, in reality they are far, far inferior. The hardware is a cheaper cast; the pickups are much poorer; but most of all, is the poor body construction. Studios are, to put it very, very bluntly, made up of the hacked-up offcuts of lower grade mahogany. An Epiphone LP Standard that costs less than half the price, actually has a more 'correct' body than a Gibson Studio does. Incidently, The Gibson 'Faded' series also suffers from this problem.

If you're hell-bent on having 'Gibson' on the headstock, the only 'cheap' one worth bothering with is the Classic series; especially the Classic Antique, which tends to be cheaper than the straight Classic. They're exactly the same as the LP Standards, but with different pickups (note; this is not neciseriily a good or a bad thing - it just depends on what exact tone you're after), and slightly annoyingly, they have less finish and neck profile options than a Standard has.

If you're willing to swing the headstock though, you've got more, frankly better options; Epiphone's Elitist range are superior to Gibson's production models in every single way except for having different pickups (again - whether this is actually a good or a bad thing depends solely on your taste). They also don't suffer from the many quality control issues that the regular Epis suffer from. In most countries they're cheaper than any Gibson too, despite the better quality (with Gibson, you really do pay a huge premium just for that logo on the headstock). I don't know about America, but over here you can buy an Epiphone Elitist LP Custom in Alpine White (the same finish you mentioned the Studio having) for about £150 less than the Gibson Studio, Faded or Classics cost.

Then there's Tokai, ESP, Vintage, Edwards, Agile, all makers of very good high-end LP copies, amoung others.


Whatever you go with though, please please please, do not waste your money on that Studio. Yes, I know it looks gorgeous - I sucked myself into buying one once just because it looked so pretty. But they really are awful guitars. You really are far better off with either the Gibson Classic series or an Epiphone Elitist.


Thank you so much. I'll be looking into this now.
#15
Here's my advice for your money:

1) Buy second hand. You'll get some great deals and if you ever regret it and need to sell it on, you won't lose much, if any cash.

2) Buy a Tokai instead of a Gibson. You'll get an amazing guitar for less money. You seriously can't go wrong. You can get a nice one with binding and all the works for less than a trimmed down Gibbo Studio. I'm sure 90% of people will back me up on this.

3) A used valve amp will serve you well my friend and will really make your tone shine. If you've been stuck on shoddy guitars and amps, you'll be in hog heaven when you hear yourself through a proper amp and a lovely Tokai.
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#16
Quote by HandsomeFrank
My dream guitar has been a Gibson Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar, the white one to be exact. A thousand dollars is a lot of money; the most I've ever spent was $75. I walked into Guitar Center once and it was the first guitar I saw and I pointed it out to my girlfriend like a little kid in a candy shop. It's the guitar I want.

I really think we should appreciate this. It's a decent guitar, and if you like it, I think you should get it. I usually talk against the Gibson LP Studio, but this kind of thing makes me think. If that one was the guitar, I think it's the one.


as far as amp goes, if you haven't defined a style yet, what about buying two amps? I think it's a great option. buying two $500 amps and a $1000 guitar would get you $2500 to spend as emergency money. you don't want anything surprising to happen and have to sell your proud les paul do you?

i've been playing guitar everyday for two and a half years, but i bought my guitars and spend way too much money on guitar related stuff. went through three guitars, four amps (not that much i know.) and more than 20 effect pedals with about half of that i made myself. I'm in the opposite position as you, and your first post made me think. a lot.

good luck man.
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#17
Me personaly? I would go for it. If I had that money right now, I would down at a guitar shop spending it.

Just as long as you know its not going to sit and collect dust or you are going to get sick of playing, go out and buy it. If your heart is set on it, go get it, don't settle for something else
#19
Quote by HandsomeFrank
...

In April I'm getting $4,500 and for the last eight years I've had no idea on what I'd spend it on, until now. ....


i'd say you still don't know what to spend it on. if i had that money i'd spend it on guns, ammo and clean, storeable food.
when blackwater marches down your street rounding up all your neighbors for the FEMA Detention Camp, you will have an alternative