#1
Just asking. Maybe I can learn something too.
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#2
I learned mine from playing sax for 5 years
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#3
books
Cmstar90: i have too lisen to a song for hours just to figure out of one part it sound and how to move my fingers tso that it sounds that way
Cmstar90: when u seem to figure it out in seconds
#4
Back when I did lessons (before my teacher moved) We would learn a song, and then learn how it made sense theoretically, and how it was constructed, ect. A great way to learn.
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#5
some where on this site ug .com is an excellent break down of music theory and I am using that along with other books to make sense of it all.
#9
I learned most of the stuff I know from books. I also learned a lot from this site, from magazines, from talking to other musicians, watching other musicians player, and simply by fooling around on the guitar/bass/piano.

If you can learn to observe and soak up every bit of information you can, that would be the best.
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#10
from playing trumpet for 7 years and sitting in my room with a keyboard
#11
learned mostly by myself on the internet and using books. I could recommend a book, but what's the point? What works great for one person often works lousy for another. The concept is universal once you understand it, but you need to get it explained to you in just the right way that it becomes clear. the best i can do is give you a good order to learn theory in:

1. Learn the 12 notes of music (A thru G) and memorize their positions on at least the two lowest strings. Remember that your open string counts as a note too, and that your 12th fret is the exact same note as your open string. Make sure you have a fairly good feel for handling a guitar and playing basic riffs and chords

2. Learn about intervals. Learn what they are, how their pattern falls on the fretboard both on single strings and on adjacent strings. Learn how they are used to form scales, and then how they are used to form chords. Try to understand every chord grip you use in terms of intervals, and which fingers you can move to get different sounds from your chords. Learn how to use octave intervals to find notes anywhere on the fretboard just by knowing their positions on two strings. Learn how to create chords just by finding the intervals, not by remembering a standard chord grip. But you should still master ALL the standard chord grips.

3. Keys. Learn how to play in key. How to easily figure out what chords will and won't work in any given key. Once again, thinking in terms of intervals will always be easier and more useful than learning chart after chart of chord patterns for a couple dozen key signatures. If your theory is interval-based, you can play in any key just by picking the first note and following the rules.

4. Modes. Learn what they are and how to use them. Basic guidelines would be to again learn the modes in terms of their pattern of intervals. Remember that there are major-sounding modes and minor-sounding modes. They are best described as "a major scale with a sharp __th" or "a minor scale with a flat __th." Also don't forget to learn the harmonic and melodic minor scales, and the pentatonic scales, which aren't really modes, but they are very handy for writing catchy songs and strong melodies.

5. The Circle of Fifths and the Order of Sharps and Flats. It might also be handy at this point to learn the very basics of how to read standard notation, and how to read a key signature. These bits of theory don't necessarily impact your physical guitar technique, but they will help you understand composition a bit more, and to see how transposing keys and changing keys is possible.

6. For more advanced stuff, there's always harmony (knowing when and where to move a riff to play it in harmony, and when and where NOT to move it), jazz harmony, jazz chords, counterpoint (two-part melodies, and the various rules thereof).

that oughta get you started
#12
music theroy class helped me a whole lotm, there just things you wont think to learn

also this book by Ellie Siegmeister called Harmony and Meoldy witch helps
#13
i learned theory from reading a couple of beginner books, from teachers, and then music school.
#14
Piano lessons way back, then UG.
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#15
The best thing you can ever look to for musical theory is abook called rock guitar secrets it has everythign start to finish that and a decent teacher
#17
I've never liked the theory teachers teach. Sure my guitar teacher knows a fair bit, allthough he know no terminology, the guitar teachers at most school normally suck. The theory thats taught to my cousin is normally wrong or wrongly explained.

I say internet and e-books.
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        L.
#18
Quote by demonofthenight
I've never liked the theory teachers teach. Sure my guitar teacher knows a fair bit, allthough he know no terminology, the guitar teachers at most school normally suck. The theory thats taught to my cousin is normally wrong or wrongly explained.

I say internet and e-books.



Ai. My guitar teacher has a masters or something similar in music, so I'm going to trust his judgment. Plus, from what he's taught me, it all lines up with what I've read on the internet, so it can be complete bullsh*t.
#19
Mainly from this book to start with. Now I just use the interweb to find whatever I'm after.

Edit: Oh yea, I remember first learning scales/modes from a free booklet that came with like issue 29 of Total Guitar.
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Last edited by ChrisN at Dec 10, 2007,
#20
Use the interent mainly. Started with a book that came with the beginner guitar pack i bought, then used the internet. UG has some good articles and this website is very useful.
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#24
Quote by splat102
Just asking. Maybe I can learn something too.

I learn so much from Guitar Player and other pubs

Also went to college

And now, forums like "UG", "The Jam Session", and in my opinion
the forum that attracts the pros and most intellectual discussion,"The Gear Page"

These forums are gateways into all things music and guitar and more.
More than you could ever have time for. Use the searce engine.

So my answer for you is ,, forums are your best source.
#25
1. Learn the 12 notes of music (A thru G) and memorize their positions on at least the two lowest strings. Remember that your open string counts as a note too, and that your 12th fret is the exact same note as your open string. Make sure you have a fairly good feel for handling a guitar and playing basic riffs and chords

2. Learn about intervals. Learn what they are, how their pattern falls on the fretboard both on single strings and on adjacent strings. Learn how they are used to form scales, and then how they are used to form chords. Try to understand every chord grip you use in terms of intervals, and which fingers you can move to get different sounds from your chords. Learn how to use octave intervals to find notes anywhere on the fretboard just by knowing their positions on two strings. Learn how to create chords just by finding the intervals, not by remembering a standard chord grip. But you should still master ALL the standard chord grips.


To extremely important topics. If learned correctly, they can help you in many, many ways.
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