#1
Well, last Christmas I got an Epi Les Paul Standard. I barely got to play it becuase my friend dropped it from over his head. Now that its the holidays I'm really starting to miss it more and more. What I want to know is if I can repair this break? Here are some pics.
Neck:

Together:

Headstock:


There is a lot of surface area so I think it can hold up. But, I dont know if the truss rod will get in the way. I have titebond glue and a clamp but Im not positive on how exactly to use them. I just want my baby back.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#3
That'd be a long shot. Best bet is to order a new neck on warmoth.com, that's what I would do in your position. Depending on how much you're willing to spend, you can probably get a better neck than what the Epi came with.
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#4
electric guitars aren't subject to quite as high tension as say a steel string acoustic. I know a guy that fixed similar damage to a classical with elmers glue and a screw. Just glue that **** clamp it and let it dry for like a day...I bet it'll be good as ever if you do a good job...
#7
^ Aye but it's a fixed neck, so it'd cost alot for a tech to redo it

But it is possible, but if you get a pro to do i, i'd expect it to not be cheap
#9
yea its very smooth and splintery and the bindings coming off of the fretboard too. Its just when I push the neck and the headstock together the truss rod is puching against me. I know thats what its supposed to do but I dont know if it will break apart the joint.

EDIT: Just to add something else I dont really care too much about how the back of the neck looks as long as it plays well.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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Last edited by AgresiveNapkins at Dec 9, 2007,
#10
you probably can fix it but i'd rather have the friend that broke it buy a new one. i mean that just f**ked up.
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#11
Yea he gave me $200 towards a new guitar which I put towards my Agile.
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#13
if that was me now, i'd just be safe and take it to a pro to get fixed. not only do i know crap all about fixing guitar necks, i just wouldn't trust myself
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#14
Quote by Redsx158
It looks like a fairly easy job I might just scratch up some of the surface first it looks very clean and smooth and the glue won't hold very well with that.


Wood glue doesn't need roughing of the surface. The glue joint is not a mechanical bond, but rather a chemical one. Wood glues require no space (ideally) between the surfaces and high clamping forces help that. If you don't clamp a glued joint, you end up with a thick layer of glue at the joint. It has no strength on its own. The thinner the glue layer, the better. Roughing up a surface prior to gluing risks creating small areas that cannot be made to mate closely even with clamping. The result is a weaker joint. The only time you would think of taking sandpaper to a joint area is if there is some type of coating that would prevent the glue from penetrating the wood cells. That will not be a problem here.

This page explains some of it a bit better than I can

http://www.diyinfo.org/wiki/What_Makes_Glue_Stick
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#15
I have the nut but the slots got all chipped up, I might be able to salvage it becuase it was a good nut. I still cant believe how much damage was done. And Im not going to get a tech to repair it becuase I got an estimate of $300 and I if cant do it Ill just buy a new body for under $300.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#16
Just glue it, I've seen cracked headstocks with harsher angled breaks be glued together fine.
#17
So the truss rod isnt going to affect the joint at all? Should I just use one clamp over the break?
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#18
I haven't read all of this, but if your having problems with the truss rod giving you tension, just loosen it. Then glue and clamp it up. Then, if you want to finish it again, sand around the joint, and spray it, or paint it.
#19
so if your friend dropped it... and he's not gonna pay for it?
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#20
Quote by ECistheBest
so if your friend dropped it... and he's not gonna pay for it?

apparently you didnt read the thread.
#21
Yea I dont think the truss rod is really enough tension to break the joint but I didnt want to do any damage to the truss rod either. Will getting glue on the truss rod hurt it? becuase when I clamp the joint more than likely glue will ooze onto it. But its wood glue so I dont think it could hurt. Im thinking of doing this today so I can do the cosmetic stuff over the weekend. Ill update my progress and add pics if anybody cares. Wish me luck!
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#22
Quote by sizzlefizzle
apparently you didnt read the thread.

so... his friend gave him $200 towards a new agile...

http://www.rondomusic.com/al3000prest.html
saving up for that one? i really want that one...
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#23
Thats a beautiful guitar but I got an AD-2000. I love it a lot expecially becuase it plays better than my friends PRS and it was only $250. If I ever need another guitar Im almost sure Im getting a high end Agile.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#27
You probably should have used a c-clamp that you could have tightened down on it and it would have applied more force to it.
Quote by Pernicano22
As the title says, i busted a nut lol
how much do they cost to fix?
#28
I think the clamp did as good as a job as anything could. I just filled the knicks and dents in with spackle and Im going to seal it soon. Heres a pic:


As I said I really dont mind if it looks bad. I'm Actually probably going to leave it so that you can tell its been broken. I think it will be a reminder of what its been through. And also to never let people touch your precious guitars.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#29
You should have just handed it over to your friend and made him pay for the fixing. So he toys around with your guitar, leaves it in pieces, and you're the one who's got all the trouble covering his mess up?

Well, good job fixing it anyway. And I agree with leaving it visible, battle scars are cool (if you're not intending to sell the guitar anyway).
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#32
Nah, Im not really a "Shredder" so Im not bothered by the so called stickiness of the neck. plus my hands get sweaty when I play and it helps make everything more slippery. All I need know is a set of strings which Ill hopefully get today. (hopefully) And I'm set! Unless it snaps... And for the last time my friend gave me $200 so everythings cool.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#33
....except its lke a $400 guitar. thats cool though. maybe try to refinish it? then it would be good as new
#34
Here it is! The finished product is almost as good as it was. There is a little bit of fret buzz going on in the lower frets but I'll see what I can do about that.



This picture doesnt do it justice at all the lighting in my basement is god awful.
Epi Les Paul Standard
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#35
if you want it to look good as new, wait until like june/july. i'm going to be refinishing an old washburn, and i have to do the back of the neck. i'll help you if you want to/remember/are still around
#36
Quote by Vulcan
Wood glue doesn't need roughing of the surface. The glue joint is not a mechanical bond, but rather a chemical one. Wood glues require no space (ideally) between the surfaces and high clamping forces help that. If you don't clamp a glued joint, you end up with a thick layer of glue at the joint. It has no strength on its own. The thinner the glue layer, the better. Roughing up a surface prior to gluing risks creating small areas that cannot be made to mate closely even with clamping. The result is a weaker joint. The only time you would think of taking sandpaper to a joint area is if there is some type of coating that would prevent the glue from penetrating the wood cells. That will not be a problem here.

This page explains some of it a bit better than I can

http://www.diyinfo.org/wiki/What_Makes_Glue_Stick

So basically you;re saying that when luthiers make the scarf joint on a headstock that they are making a weak joint simply because they sand it? Wow, you sir are a tool. I would suggest that you go back and re-read that article you posted because what you said completely butchered their scientific point. I understand you gave them credit by saying that they can explain it better then you, but you just sounded like an idiot. Sorry to be a dick, but damn.