#2
Could you explain them please? I've never heard of them, and I'm keen to learn more theory
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#3
do you mean voicing like

D/C

to play on C∆#11

either when comping or improvising (they're the same thing, really)

because if so, it's a technique I'm trying to develop and get used to but I am by no means a master.
#4
yeah like d/c. how'd you make the major seven triangle?

i like one to play Bb+/C = c e g Bb d f#

is there a way to notate USTs? like b7+/1 for the example i gave?

hey Ænimus Prime, USTs are a bit difficult to explain but hang with me.
First, look at the name: Upper Structure Triads. I'm assuming your familiar with triads.
The upper structure (and this is a loose definition) is the top part of the chord, above the root.
For example, take a C major seven chord. It's spelled C E G B. But E G B also spells E minor. So you could say that E minor is an upper structure of Cmaj7.
Or take an A9 chord: A C# E G B. Again, there is an E minor triad on top.
So I guess there are two points to upper structure triads:
1. Make complex chords easier to play over
2. Find complex chords by experiementing with UST juxtaposition
#5
option + j on a mac - I'm sure theres an alt + # code for it on a PC board.

the way I see it is that conceptualizing complex chords as a number of triads simplifies things a great deal - muscle memory needs far less shapes and its far more "modular" and easy to re-apply stuff you already know to unfamiliar things. The hard part (the part I'm still struggling with) is to see a chord like C∆#11 as [ (C E G) (E G B) (G B D) (B D F#) (D F# A) (F# A C) ] all at the same time - different routes for different sounds. And using these to use ambiguity to your advantage - an easy way for a chord to have 2 different functions is for the note that separates those functions missing from the chord.

As far as notation goes I feel that using these is something you apply to harmony as you play it - but if you wanted to notate a specific voicing, slash is the way to go I think - the harmony you want in the bass, and the triad on top. this is great for pedal tones - take this part of moment's notice:

Eb/Bb F-/Bb G-/Bb F-/Bb Eb/Bb

This is all an Eb chord, in 2nd inversion. Eb, Esus, E∆. The sound over the Bb, however, is very distinctive.

This gets really interesting when you start getting into quartal voicing - but I don't know enough there to go into it much.
#6
Ok thanks, so how do you use UST?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
see a chord like C∆#11 as [ (C E G) (E G B) (G B D) (B D F#) (D F# A) (F# A C) ]

^that's the important part - break down each chord into its component triads, and instead of trying to grip a complex chord, simply play these triads in succession.

This works very well with ii chords - play this:

E-....F#-/E....E-/G/E....F#-/A/E....E-/B/E....F#-/C#/E....E-
--------------------------------------------------------------------
0------2---------5-----------7----------8-----------10--------12
0------2---------4-----------6----------9-----------11--------12
2------4---------5-----------7----------9-----------11--------14
---------------------------------------------------------------------
---0--------0---------0------------0-----------0-----------0------


play this over your next Em vamp.
#8
This is one of the reasons I think learning diatonic triads is so important. Many
people seem to be locked in to the notion that you have to play the triad or
arpeggiate the same as the chord( 1 3 5). But if you're semi-randomly improvising
diatonic triads over any diatonic chord, you'll automatically get all the color tones
and upper structures of the chords. Makes it a lot more interesting than plodding
thru matching each triad with the 1 3 5 of the chord. Once you've gotten a
handle on that, you can make it even more interesting by using triads to build
altered structures.