#1
Hey I'm just startin out with the blues. Are there any movable blues scales ? (not just your boring minor pentatonic box scale) Also, how do you know where that "blue" (I think it's a diminished 5th?) note is in a scale?
I understand the 12 bar blues for the most part, but, how do you know what chords to play just by looking at the keys?

I know this a lot but if I could get some advice from some of you who have met the at the crossroads already it would help me tremendously.

Thanks

P.S. I know I'm a noob dont make fun haha
#2
blues scale is a minor pentatonic with a flat 5. 12-bar blues has the 1, 4, and 5 chords. if you dont know what those are.... im really sorry for you
#3
boring minor pentatonic?! well first of all, there are 5 different patterns you can learn of the 'boring' minor pentatonic if thats what you mean, you should learn all 5 positions. also check out the major pentatonic, it depends on the key of the song you are soloing over of course. the blue note is actually a flatted 5th (diminished implies that it is flatted twice), but i guess you could also use a flatted 3rd. the twelve bar blues is generally gonna be:
I I I I
IV IV I I
V IV I V
so in the key of C, a C major or dominant is the I chord, F major (or dominant) is the IV chord, and a G major (or dominant) is the V chord. just count letters up from the tonic. another example in the key of Bb would be I=Bb, IV=Eb, V=F (you also need to keep in mind the key signature of the tonic, Bb has two flats in it: Bb and Eb). hope that helps man, the main thing to keep in mind, however, is that the blues isn't supposed to be technical. it's all about the feeling. the best way to get it is to listen to the blues legends like robert johnson or buddy guy.
#4
Cool Cool thanks a lot. I know that the minor pent. scale isnt boring, its obviously one of the most used scales out there. What I meant was the boring box scale (which isnt that bad its just basically all i know).
Keep in mind I've only been playin about 9 months sobeisbull. Ive hear of the l lV and V chords I just didnt know how to apply them until chromy explained it.

What are the names of the other patterns? Or where can I find them?
Also, if im soloing do I change scales with the chords? Ex. key of C, when C changes to F do I change from a C to an F scale or do I stay in C?

btw Buddy Guy and Robert Johnson are amazing
#5
http://www.blguitar.com/lesson/advanced/5blues_shapes.html

That site shows you all 5 positions of the blues scale which is movable to any fret on the guitar.

The bottom picture has the blue notes in there. The 'blue notes' are the stars.

So if the song is in G just start the first position (Boring box position) at the 3rd fret and follow on from there. Same with any other key, just have the first note of the box position, on the low E string the same as the key you're in and you're good to go. (Also remember the pattern continues on after the 5th position it goes back to pos 1 again so you can play up and down the whole neck)

You don't have to change positions with the chords, you just stay in the key the song is in.

The fretboard map looks complicated but once you memorize all the positions the boring pentatonic scale becomes a LOT more fun when you can play all over the neck.

Hope that helped.

Oh and there are other scales you can use, I know you can use a major scale over blues but I think you have to do it weird, like if it's 12bar blues in C you have to play in F I think. It's a lot more complicated and harder to sound good too so learning the pentatonic is best first.

Maybe someone else can explain using the major scale over blues better than me for you.
#7
Besides the theory part of it:

"You need emotional content..."
Bruce Lee

Just play the notes that express what you're feeling at the moment best .
Of course dont forget to stay in key with the backing.

But yeah he guys above are right.

Just pop in loads of cromatics with your regural box shapes for a more jazzy sound.

Rock on.
#8
If you wanna play like Robert Johnson, if you wanna play the delta blues, minor pentatonic isn't important.
He was a slide guitarist. However, I thoroughly suggest learn as much as you can about playing all types of blues.
#9
There's also the use of "ambiguous 3rd's" this means that, while the blues scale does have a minor 3rd, you can substitute a major 3rd. Just don't play them right after each other, unless as a passing tone.
I <3 bangoodcharlotte

Quote by humperdunk
one time i let my cat has cheezburger. i thought it was pretty funny.
#10
this may sound weird but i think theory and the blues dont go good together....... i mean yea you need to no your chords of the 12 bar and basic knowledge of keys....... but learning the blues should be alot about feeling and improvisation. sit down with some of your favorite albums and try to learn some of the songs off them. improv is very important in blues. and dont sit in your room bein a nerd and practicin scales. get out and jam with a rhythm guitarist or a full band. it will make you better i promise. also like someone above said learn all different styles of blues. learn some slide like robert johnson and play some blues rock like cream. everything from stevie ray vaughan to bb king.
Last edited by malcs at Dec 15, 2007,
#11
Quote by malcs
this may sound weird but i think theory and the blues dont go good together....... i mean yea you need to no your chords of the 12 bar and basic knowledge of keys....... but learning the blues should be alot about feeling and improvisation. sit down with some of your favorite albums and try to learn some of the songs off them. improv is very important in blues. and dont sit in your room bein a nerd and practicin scales. get out and jam with a rhythm guitarist or a full band. it will make you better i promise. also like someone above said learn all different styles of blues. learn some slide like robert johnson and play some blues rock like cream. everything from stevie ray vaughan to bb king.


Very true but, you have to have some handle on what youre doing. I would reccomend anyone to know theory but not depend on it, if your stuck look at ur box scale and go from there but yes you do have a point.
Any improvisationalist should know their scales and forms of scales without having to think about it, this way you can be confident because ur first solo in front of people, you wont be feelin ****, you just gotta noodle in ur nice little box and hope it sounds alrite. Eventually you build up confidence and can close ur eyes and feel the music infront of a crowd.
About your bit on the jamming, if you gotta ask what to play over ther riffs every song, they wont jam with you for long.
The only things we hate are those things we try to hide from others.

Quote by Deliriumbassist
Quote by Carmel
Either way, I don't think bananas should be placed in such proximity to an ass

I disagree. Bananas and ass are like peaches and cream.
#12
Quote by malcs
this may sound weird but i think theory and the blues dont go good together....... i mean yea you need to no your chords of the 12 bar and basic knowledge of keys....... but learning the blues should be alot about feeling and improvisation. sit down with some of your favorite albums and try to learn some of the songs off them. improv is very important in blues. and dont sit in your room bein a nerd and practicin scales. get out and jam with a rhythm guitarist or a full band. it will make you better i promise. also like someone above said learn all different styles of blues. learn some slide like robert johnson and play some blues rock like cream. everything from stevie ray vaughan to bb king.



Again, I will say this is true, but BB King to SRV, isn't that much of the blues, it seems to me, you like know of chicago blues, blues rock, and Robert Leroy Johnson.

But you don't know of the delta blues, it is completely different, and Robert Johnson falls into the delta blues, for he was "king of the delta blues", delta blues is not for a band really, maybe a harmonica player and a guitarist/singer, but it what the ts must comprehend, is that there is no right or wrong way to play blues. Or music for that matter.

------------------
Quote by SuPaGrAm
Very true but, you have to have some handle on what youre doing. I would reccomend anyone to know theory but not depend on it, if your stuck look at ur box scale and go from there but yes you do have a point.
Any improvisationalist should know their scales and forms of scales without having to think about it, this way you can be confident because ur first solo in front of people, you wont be feelin ****, you just gotta noodle in ur nice little box and hope it sounds alrite. Eventually you build up confidence and can close ur eyes and feel the music infront of a crowd.
About your bit on the jamming, if you gotta ask what to play over ther riffs every song, they wont jam with you for long.


This is again true, depending on if you are playing blues rock though, it is not similar to chicago blues, let alone delta blues. Learn songs, and you will learn to mix things together when playing slide. I will let others say what to do for more rock styled things, as it isn't where my strengths lie.
Last edited by ze monsta at Dec 16, 2007,
#13
yea i agree you should learn your basic scales. but what i mainly mean is sit down and chip away and work on what sounds good, using different techniques. yea i guess i only know of a couple of harmonica players. kim wilson of the faboulous thunderbirds and little walter.