#1
What's a good method i can use to help me memorise 90 seconds of text?
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#4
Read it again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again ...


Until you wake up shouting the whole text in cold-sweat.
#5
Gouge it into your chest with a compass, you'll remember it then. If not, you can just take a quick peek if you get stuck.
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#7
Get someone else to read it to you
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#8
Read it. Say it. Check. Repeat.

Making a song seems like a great idea, too!
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#9
Break it into smaller sections and memorize those, like if you were doing flashcards or something. Then when you feel comfortable with each of the individual parts, practice it all together. That's what I did for my Shakespeare class when we had to do Hamlet monologues.

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#10
Ah, that common unit of measurement for prose length... seconds.

So, talk quickly and you'll have less to remember, no?
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#11
yeah i gotta do the same thing i gotta memorize the first 18 lines of the canterbury tales.

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#14
if it's for a talk, the best way isn't to memorise a block of text but to make a few points (say, one for each paragraph) and remember those, and talk about each one on the spot; obviously read it all through lots and make sure you know what you're on about.
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#15
Depends what you're remembering it for. But when I had to learn my French speech for a minute and a half for GCSE, what I did was split it into paragraphs, and learn one, made sure I knew it and then learnt the next, so I could put them together. Ninety seconds isn't too bad as long as you don't try to cam it.
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#17
just like you would learn a long and complicated guitar solo

read it slowly, learn every sentence separatedly, and then put them together

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Ah, that common unit of measurement for prose length... seconds.

So, talk quickly and you'll have less to remember, no?


if he talks quickly, he'll have to talk more...
#18
Don't memorize it...learn it. Memorization makes a passage bland and unfeeling. Learn the concepts of what you're talking about, and the way you'll talk about it will come naturally, and thusly, the exact words you're looking for.

Also, repetition, repetition, repetition.
#19
Its in german you see and i can't really make it on the spot. Its probably exactly what dinkydaisy was talking about but for german.
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#20
Read it, then without looking try to recite it. Take a note of where you get stuck, read the passage again, and then try once more to recite it without looking. Repeat until you can comfortably reach the end of the passage.
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#21
I had to learn ALOT of latin set text for my GCSE's, hundreds and hundreds of lines. The best method starts with a box of maltesers (or other small consumable e.g. jelly babies or minstrels, I personally did this with mini eggs as it was easter) Then take the text (which I presume is for an oral?) and seperate it into sensible chunks so every sentence or so put a little mark. Now learn the first line and say it back out loud, if you get it right, well done you get a malteser! now learn the next chunk, but before you get a malteser you must read out the first AND second chunks, keep doing this until you get to about the 5th chunk, then on the 6th chunk just read back chunks 2-6, and keep going until you've learn it all, then do a malteser per paragraph when going over stuff you've already learnt.

I know this sounds childish and a bit silly, but it doesnt work cause you're getting rewards, the rewards just break the text up into little chunks and allow you to learn it, if you just break it up into arbitrary chunks and then tell yourself that your going to learn it a piece at a time it just doesnt work, you just glaze over and nothing happens. I tried lots of different methods for learning texts, and this was by far the best way for long-lasting retention, it does take a bit longer than the keep reading it till you know it methods, but it works a hell of alot better in the end.
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#22
I'm an actor, and the way I go about learning long blocks of text is just to take a few sentences at a time. Say them aloud reading, then without looking. When you've got them, go for the next few sentences. When you've got those, do both groups, and so on, until you have it all.

Look here, upon this picture, and on this,
The counterfeit presentment of two brothers.
See what a grace was seated on this brow.
Hyperion's curls, the front of Jove himself,
An eye like Mars to threaten and command,
A station like the herald Mercury, new-lighted
On a heaven-kissing hill,
So on and so forth.
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