#1
Hi,

I've been wanting to learn to play the guitar for a few years now. I bought a cheap guitar about 5 years ago and gave up quickly. Come to find out, it was a piece of junk, my guitar playing friend couldnt even play it well.

Now that I make a little more money I can afford something quality. I was surfing youtube and found a guy playing the spanish guitar (http://www.youtube.com/user/johnclarkemusic). That's what I want to play. So my question is: How do I go from an absolute newbie to playing spanish guitar? Should I start off learning on a spanish guitar? Or should I learn on a regular accoustic? Any insight offered would be appreciated.

Thanks,

S41
#2
I started guitar with classical, and I would recommend doing the same. Not necessarily just for the music aspect (which is very awesome), but for the techniques and theory that go along with it. I can see it helping a lot with whatever style you want to play, spanish included.

If you're serious about learning, you should look into finding a good teacher or something. You could also try reading through some posts and threads about beginner practice methods, some of which I'm sure are posted on this site.

Hope that helps a little.
#3
*moved*
Populus vult decipi. Decipiatur.

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It's can be a contraction and genitive case.

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If you cut down on these costs students won't learn so well, effecting the "quality"...
#4
Learn regular acoustic, then branch off from there

You need the basics, like chords, notes, scales, etc.

Now when you say acoustic, I hope you mean classical, 'cause most flamenco players from paco de lucia to the gipsy kings, use classical guitars, with the nylon strings.

Because if you haven't noticed the fretboard on a classical guitar is a lot wider than acoustics and electrics.

Fingerpickin'

Fingerpickin' is key in flamenco, if you don't know fingerpickin', then you're out.
the flamenco strum is pretty hard to get down, but once you do, it sounds so good.

Some good pieces to listen to to get you in the feel of things is Concierto Aranjuez, Mediterranean Sundance by paco de lucia, al di meola, and john mclaughlin, and Soy by gipsy kings, it's one of my favorite songs by them.

I'm not saying it's mandatory to learn them, hell, i'm not even say you should learn them, I'm just saying, listen to them, and get into the feel of it
hue
#5
Quote by sock_demon
Learn regular acoustic, then branch off from there

You need the basics, like chords, notes, scales, etc.

Now when you say acoustic, I hope you mean classical, 'cause most flamenco players from paco de lucia to the gipsy kings, use classical guitars, with the nylon strings.

Because if you haven't noticed the fretboard on a classical guitar is a lot wider than acoustics and electrics.

Fingerpickin'

Fingerpickin' is key in flamenco, if you don't know fingerpickin', then you're out.
the flamenco strum is pretty hard to get down, but once you do, it sounds so good.

Some good pieces to listen to to get you in the feel of things is Concierto Aranjuez, Mediterranean Sundance by paco de lucia, al di meola, and john mclaughlin, and Soy by gipsy kings, it's one of my favorite songs by them.

I'm not saying it's mandatory to learn them, hell, i'm not even say you should learn them, I'm just saying, listen to them, and get into the feel of it


Sock, thanks for the response. When I said regular accoustic I was refering to a folk accoustic, I guess, the narrower neck guitar. I thought classic and spanish guitars where the same.

Is it harder to learn to play on a classic guitar vs. a folk guitar? I would think the wider neck would make finger placement for the chords more difficult. I've been told I have small hands for a guy. So I wonder if there are any limitations when it comes to playing a classic.

Thanks for your insight guys,

S41
#6


[rant]

Mediterranean Sundance =/= Flamenco. There are sections of it which are in the form of rumba but other than that it's Al di Meola on rocket fuel.

Concierto de Aranjuez= Classical guitar concerto. Not Spanish guitar.(I will get back to this)

Classical guitars =/= Flamenco guitars

The build, action, woods, sound, size is different. View this thread for more information. They may looks similar but they sound different. Ok, searching has been disabled once more. I'll edit in the thread when I have time to search manually.

Right, here is where the real rant comes in:

There is a HUGE difference between Spanish guitar, flamenco and classical guitar. An easy way of putting it is:

Not all flamenco guitarists are gypsies, but most are Spanish. Not all Spanish guitarist are flamenco guitarist. Not all Spanish music is flamenco, but most modern Flamenco is by Spanish musicians with roots from the east, africa, old gypsy troupes etc. Classical guitarists may be Spanish, but they are neither playing Spanish music or Flamenco. Why you might ask?

Because classical music is played all over the world, you have composers and guitarists from places that go from Spain to Uruguay to Australia. Whilst Spanish music, is folkloric. Spain is divided in communities, each of them with their own type of folk music. The Galician(from Galicia) music is reminiscent of Celtic music whilst the folk from Andalucía is reminiscent of flamenco... it's not though. Why?

Because it's copla, sevillanas and other types forms sound like flamenco but really aren't. Have flamenco singers done coplas, yes. Are coplas flamenco? No. Same goes for Sevillanas(type of dance)...

Err, that comment on fingerpicking comment was pretty blunt. He is a beginner, telling him that if he can't fingerpick he is out if pretty pointless because most beginners can't.

Finally, that guy in the video is neither flamenco or Spanish folklore. He is also pretty corny. Lol. He is good, but if you want flamenco:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ogjWQtSFMg&feature=related <- FLAMENCO!



[/rant]

In a much softer tone, I'd recommend you learn to play the guitar in general, I'd push you towards the classical guitar since I am one myself, but, if you prefer the sound, tone and feel of steel strings over nylon, for now, that's your choice. Finally if you are going to be playing classical guitar, teachers FTW

EDIT: my post is long...


err and small hands is all excuses. Look at Xuefei Yang, Lie Ji... girls with tiny tiny hands but tremendous skill. Remember, your only limits are those you give yourself.


Last edited by confusius at Dec 13, 2007,
#7
confusious,

thanks man. I'll have to read through your post a couple times to take it all in...lol. When it comes to spanish, flamenco, classical. is it all the same instrument?

S41
#8
No.

Classical uses classical guitars.

Flamenco uses flamenco guitars.

Not really sure what folklore Spanish uses. It is nylon string though.

I'll see if I can dig up the old flamenco thread.
#9
Quote by confusius
No.

Classical uses classical guitars.

Flamenco uses flamenco guitars.

Not really sure what folklore Spanish uses. It is nylon string though.

I'll see if I can dig up the old flamenco thread.



Thanks man. I appreciate it.

S41