#1
are there any exercises that help you develop good soloing skills. i can play fast, i can do hammer ons and pull offs, i can do pinch harmonics efficiently, just i cant move from string to string and around the board fast enough. does anyone have any exercises that may help me with this?
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#2
finally. someone i share problems with. i suggest you learn economy picking. thats what im practicing. its pretty efficient. if you're like me you can probably pick 16th notes at 220 bpm on the same string but when it comes to string changing the speed goes down to like 110-120 bpm
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#4
practice your scales up and down along all six strings, just go from tonic to tonic in as many octaves as you can cover without having to move up or down more than one or two frets, that will get you used to moving from one string to the next, once you're comfortable with that part of the scale go up a few frets and repeat the process to get yourself used to that part of the neck under that scale, rinse and repeat until you cover the entire fretboard, then you should be comfortable enough with your guitar that you can play anything, anywhere on it, weather you're doing it vertically or horizontally
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#5
my advice is to doodle in the pentatonic scale first of all, not only is it the most commonly recognised scale but it helps you to practice moving around the strings better.

Also Don't forget though that playing fast doesn't make your solos better, kirk himself thought his unforgiven solo was one of his best and it's not lightning fast, just phrased well (phrasing being your note choice and attitude you play them with).

You'll find plenty of pentatonic licks littering the net, just get googling and have fun.
#6
I agree with iron, thats what i did, although i'm not incredibly fast, it improved my speed, if i put more time into it, i'd get faster. stick with it! 10 mins continuously up and down pentatonic scales, see how fast you can do it without making mistakes
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#7
Learn some theory - the biggest obstacle to moving round the fretboard is knowing where to go, you can spend ages wondering what to play. Some basic theory will teach you what notes sound good in what situations so you'll have a better idea of where your soloing can go. Ultimately, you can only play as fast as you can think.

Shredding scales up and down isn't really the way to go, all that does is ingrain scale patterns in muscle memory. You're far better off actually learning the scales themselves and how they work musically.
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#8
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Shredding scales up and down isn't really the way to go, all that does is ingrain scale patterns in muscle memory. You're far better off actually learning the scales themselves and how they work musically.


Umm......I think you'll find that nearly every single guitarist started out by playing scales and chromatics until they felt comfortable on the guitar, and at the begining who cares about the story behind scales, you just want to sound good (afterall speed and accuracy will come with time and being comfortable with the instrument). I recall guitar players like dave mustaine etc (not virtuoso players but pretty damn good) said they started out doing all the "blockhead" stuff in the beginning.
#9
...and typically shredding up and down scales doesn't sound good.
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#10
Don't get stuck in "box" shapes

Learn the scales you practice up and down each string instead of low E to high e

That way you'll be able to move around and transition much better
#11
well from what you said, i do a lot of doodling in the E minor pentatonic scale becasue that is the scale i know best and all over the fret board, infact its probably the only one i know at themoment, and i add in other E minor scale notes aswell, so all i do at the moment is doodle. i've been doing this for about a month. but i don't have a lot of time to play my guitar. so ill guess ill just stick at it. cheers
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#12
In terms of practicing, don't bother with scales. The best methods of practice are going to be things that aren't inherently musical because scales aren't going to evenly work all of your fingers.

From a low end guitarist standpoint, practicing with scales is much less efficient. Most of the better mechanical practice exercises sound terrible, but they work much better than scales.

From a high end guitarist standpoint, scale shapes are pretty useless, so reinforcing them is not helpful. For example, if you are playing a basic A minor pentatonic, and you want to trill the minor third and fourth, well to do that, you already have dropped out of the box shape anyways, and you could slide back to the A root after that, but you could also hit the open A for the same note, or you could hit both and reinforce it by playing the unison. Not to mention once you have a feel for all the intervals, scales aren't really going to be something you think about too much.
#13
The only way to get good at "soloing" is to...well, solo alot. Turn on your radio, and try to jam with every song that comes on. Even if all you can do is play a pentatonic "box" shape, the important thing is that you are improvising.