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#1
Ok, I saw a lot of threads popping up all over the place so I decided to create a thread that deals with it.

Definition Of Fret Buzz.
= When the string catches the frets when strumming or playing the notes. Caused by a number of things, it is one of the most common problems.

There are some simple and not so simple methods of dealing with it. They are:

ACTION RISING AND LOWERING


This is probably the most common problem that causes fret buzz on our guitars.
Its fairly simple to treat. If you notice that when you are strumming open strings or playing notes at certain frets, you are getting a buzz then your action is probably too low. You will need to increase its height in order to treat the problem. If you would like to perform this action yourself then there are lots of articles on the internet that take you step-by-step through the process and (I think) there is also a thread made on action on UG forums. However, if you'd prefer to go to a shop and get it done by professionals then I would definitely recommend it.

Every guitar player should learn to set his or her own action. It's easy and you can fine tune it to suit your playing, which a tech might not be able to do. He can get it close,. but maybe not exactly right for you. It's not difficult, only takes a few inexpensive tools, and about an hour to finish if you take your time.

Keep in mind every time you change it, everything else needs to be checked. String height affects intonation, Fender floating bridges have springs in back that affect it, and the string gauge changes the action too.

If you don't know how to set your own action, check around at local guitar shops, you'll probably find a pro willing to teach you how. It's not difficult, set the string height then check and reset intonation if necessary. In a few cases truss rod adjustments will become necessary, but very rarely.

Some guitars also have a pivoting neck, that's the proper way to adjust the action with those. Look for an allen screw on the plate on back of the guitar where the neck connects to the body. If the bolt plate has an allen screw, that's what it is. you loosen the screws, change the allen screw setting, tighten the neck again and check it. Check the manufacturer's website, they may have instructions for your specific guitar.

Oh, and the truss rod IS NOT the way to adjust the action. It's done by adjusting the bridge height or the neck pivot as noted above.


NUT PROBLEMS


This can be a very awkward process and action to perform.
If you see that ,when you strum harder, the string vibrates in the nut, then you have a serious nut problem. To resolve this problem, you will need to splash out the funds in order to buy a new nut for your guitar.


The nut may not always need to be replaced, it may just need to be recut.

The slots in the nut have to be angled downward and the correct width for the strings. String width is pretty forgiving, but the angle is not. If it's too flat it will buzz and it's not easy to troubleshoot if you aren't aware of it but here's how.

Play a note you know buzzes, then press down on the string behind the nut and try it again. If it stops buzzing the nut angle is wrong or the slot is too wide, more likely the angle. That's because it has too much surface area touching the string and not enough downward pressure to hold it tight and keep it from buzzing. It's trying to use the back of the nut as a fulcrum point, not the front where it should be. The string is loose across that short area and buzzes.

In a lot of cases the nut may also be too high, causing intonation problems with open chords, similar to pressing the strings too hard, which is much more common. Changing the nut slot angle is not difficult for a good luthier or repair tech, but the nut files required cost a lot, at least $100 a set. It's easier to remove it, sand a bit off the bottom and replace it to lower it. The slots must be filed so that the strings sit a certain distance from the first fret, and angled downward so they have a fulcrum point to sit on and don't buzz. They also have to be spaced right for the guitar and it's usually best not to let them sit too deep in the nut, the top can always be sanded off easily. If the nut is too low, it's best to replace it but it can also be shimmed.

STRING GAUGE PROBLEMS


This is a very easy thing to treat. If you get a fret buzz then it may be to do with the gauge of your strings. Its a very simple process to treat though and not a lot of funds need to be used at all . You will simply need to invest in some new strings. I recommend Ernie Ball strings for their superb quality.

That should be more related to the action being too low than the string gauge, if the action is too low it will still buzz with different gauge strings unless you go to the Black Diamond telephone cables I used as a kid. If it buzzes, it's because the action is too low, very rarely because the string gauge needs to be changed. But changing string gauges can cause buzz, if you go to a really light gauge strings from .013's. From .009 to .010 or vice versa shouldn't buzz.

BRIDGE PROBLEMS


Your strings may be catching the bridge that is a common causer of fret buzz. This is usually resolved by the simple action of adjusting the action. It is only in very rare cases that the bridge will have to be changed.

Again more action than bridge problem. Too much surface area and not enough downward angle.File the saddles to deeper and more angled grooves to stop the buzzing on the small 3 strings. The only other thing I'm aware of that can cause buzzing is if the saddle slots are too wide. And neither is fret buzz, they fall in the category of general buzz problems, but good to mention here nonetheless.

TRUSS ROD PROBLEMS


If you store your guitar in an environment that is too hot then you can receive a warping of the neck and a bowing of the truss rod. This can be a serious problem and can result in your guitar having an unrepairable problem. If you suspect this is the problem then I strongly recommend you take it to guitar technicians, specialists etc and get it sorted straight away. I wouldn't recommend doing it yourself at all as it is a very risky business.

The neck should have a slight backbow, in other words it should be a tiny bit further from the strings in the middle than the ends. to check it, put a capo on the 1st fret and fret a string at the last fret. You should have a slight gap at the 7th to 9th frets, about enough to fit a medium guitar pick in at most.

if it needs more backbow, loosen the truss rod, if it needs less, tighten it. VERY CAREFULLY. Never, EVER more than 1/4 turn in either direction. Put a drop of oil on my truss rods the night before you make any adjustments and let it soak in overnight, so if the threads are rusted you don't break it because it is frozen in place.
After adjusting let it sit at least overnight to settle before making further adjustments, 1/4 turn, no more.

Again, BE CAREFUL. If you are the least bit unsure of your ability to adjust a truss rod, or don't believe in following instructions, take it to a professional.
If in doubt, take it to a pro.

FRET LIFTING


Frets can lift therefore causing contact with the strings which results in fret buzz. To get rid of this problem, the frets that have been lifted will need to be reduced back to their normal place so that the problem is ceased. I recommend that you also let professionals do this job aswell as again, this is risky business if you try and perform it yourself.

Use a small hammer and a wood block or hardwood dowel, tap lightly and watch closely. You can tap them right back into place without much trouble. Support the neck on your leg, don't bang on it hanging out in midair.

FRET GROOVES


You can wear grooves in the frets after playing a guitar for a few years and have to file and re-crown the frets. If you pull your bottom 3 strings aside, you'll probably see grooves in the frets if you have played it every day for a couple of years. These cause both buzzing and intonation problems, both because you are pushing the string down further to hit that groove. Then it either pulls the string out of tune or makes it too close to the next fret and it buzzes. This is the type buzz you have if it only happens on a couple of frets, usually close to the nut.

It can be cured by filing the tops of the frets down until the grooves are gone then filing a round top (crown) back on the fret. I've also seen an old 14" wood plane used, with sandpaper taped onto the bottom, it works great because it's long and covers a lot of neck at one time and it's flat. After a couple of filing jobs, the frets will be too thin and need replacement.

Fret leveling may also be needed if the frets are not all the same height, a problem occasionally with cheaper guitars because the factory won't spend a few extra bucks.

FALLAWAY


"Fallaway" this were the height of each subsequent fret from headstock to body is slightly lower than the last (this is rare) what is very common is from the 12th fret up. This makes for easier bending and no "fretting-out."
These things coupled with bridge/tailpeice,saddle, and truss rod adjustments is how to get super low and QUIET action..

To research common questions in the set-up of your guitar please visit this thread:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=602241&page=1&pp=20


SPECIAL THANKS TO:
PALEO PETE.
JJ1565
REVERSED MOHAWK
Last edited by Ben Wright at Jan 20, 2008,
#4
You didn't mention about over-bowing/under-bowing in the truss rod.
You didn't mention about fret's lifting or needing dressing/re-crowning.

Add some info on that if this thread get's kept up.
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
#5
Quote by Kingyem0c0re
You didn't mention about over-bowing/under-bowing in the truss rod.
You didn't mention about fret's lifting or needing dressing/re-crowning.

Add some info on that if this thread get's kept up.


Done and done. Thanks for the addition.
Last edited by Ben Wright at Dec 25, 2007,
#6
Sorry, forgot some stuff.

Try adding info on adjusting the different types of bridges, like FR, TOM, Vintage bridges, ect. or at least link the other threads stating this.

Edit:
Ask a mod like UTBDan if you can sticky this too?
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
Last edited by Kingyem0c0re at Dec 25, 2007,
#8
Quote by BoredGuitarist7
Lol :-)

My guitar gear:
Epiphone G-400
Kasuga Les Paul Custom (Broken nut)
Marshall Silver Jubilee 2553 head
Marshall Silver Jubilee 2x12 cab

My bass gear:
Gibson SG EB-3 1963
Dynacord Eminent II
Marshall 4x10 cab

Rest is in profile
#9
Pretty good, but a couple of points that may be useful, and more detailed info in some cases.

Nut Problems

The nut may not always need to be replaced, it may just need to be recut.

The slots in the nut have to be angled downward and the correct width for the strings. String width is pretty forgiving, but the angle is not. If it's too flat it will buzz and it's not easy to troubleshoot if you aren't aware of it but here's how.

Play a note you know buzzes, then press down on the string behind the nut and try it again. If it stops buzzing the nut angle is wrong or the slot is too wide, more likely the angle. That's because it has too much surface area touching the string and not enough downward pressure to hold it tight and keep it from buzzing. It's trying to use the back of the nut as a fulcrum point, not the front where it should be. The string is loose across that short area and buzzes.

In a lot of cases the nut may also be too high, causing intonation problems with open chords, similar to pressing the strings too hard, which is much more common. Changing the nut slot angle is not difficult for a good luthier or repair tech, but the nut files required cost a lot, at least $100 a set. It's easier to remove it, sand a bit off the bottom and replace it to lower it. The slots must be filed so that the strings sit a certain distance from the first fret, and angled downward so they have a fulcrum point to sit on and don't buzz. They also have to be spaced right for the guitar and it's usually best not to let them sit too deep in the nut, the top can always be sanded off easily. If the nut is too low, it's best to replace it but it can also be shimmed.

String gauge problems

That should be more related to the action being too low than the string gauge, if the action is too low it will still buzz with different gauge strings unless you go to the Black Diamond telephone cables I used as a kid. If it buzzes, it's because the action is too low, very rarely because the string gauge needs to be changed. But changing string gauges can cause buzz, if you go to a really light gauge strings from .013's. From .009 to .010 or vice versa shouldn't buzz. Mine didn't when I went from .010's to .009's years ago on every guitar I have except the lap steel.

Bridge problems

Again more action than bridge problem. That said, I have a Cort CL 1500 with a very bad bridge design, almost exactly the same as the nut problem I described earlier, too much surface area and not enough downward angle. I had to file the saddles to deeper and more angled grooves to stop the buzzing on the small 3 strings. The only other thing I'm aware of that can cause buzzing is if the saddle slots are too wide. And neither is fret buzz, they fall in the category of general buzz problems, but good to mention here nonetheless.

Fret lifting

Use a small hammer and a wood block or hardwood dowel, tap lightly and watch closely. You can tap them right back into place without much trouble. Support the neck on your leg, don't bang on it hanging out in midair.

Truss rod

PLEASE heed the warning above that it is risky...I've broken them, I know a professional guitar repair tech here, very good one too, who broke one last year. It was more expensive than a new guitar so he had to replace the customer's guitar.

The neck should have a slight backbow, in other words it should be a tiny bit further from the strings in the middle than the ends. to check it, put a capo on the 1st fret and fret a string at the last fret. You should have a slight gap at the 7th to 9th frets, about enough to fit a medium guitar pick in at most.

if it needs more backbow, loosen the truss rod, if it needs less, tighten it. VERY CAREFULLY. Never, EVER more than 1/4 turn in either direction. I like to put a drop of oil on my truss rods the night before I make any adjustments and let it soak in overnight, so if the threads are rusted I don't break it because it is frozen in place. I've seen them broken trying to loosen it...

After adjusting let it sit at least overnight to settle before making further adjustments, 1/4 turn, no more. I let mine sit a week, playing them is acceptable, of course, they don't have to sit there untouched.

Again, BE CAREFUL. If you are the least bit unsure of your ability to adjust a truss rod, or don't believe in following instructions, take it to a professional. I didn't touch a truss rod until I had been doing all my own guitar repairs for 20 years, I still don't like to adjust them even though I know how quite well.

If in doubt, take it to a pro.

Action

Every guitar player should learn to set his or her own action. It's easy and you can fine tune it to suit your playing, which a tech might not be able to do. He can get it close,. but mayube not exactly right for you. It's not difficult, only takes a few inexpensive tools, and about an hour to finish if you take your time.

Keep in mind every time you change it, everything else needs to be checked. String height affects intonation, Fender floating bridges have springs in back that affect it, adn the string gauge changes the action too.

If you don't know how to set your own action, check around at local guitar shops, you'll probably find a pro willing to teach you how. It's not difficult, set the string height then check and reset intonation if necessary. In a few cases truss rod adjustments will become necessary, but very rarely.

Some guitars also have a pivoting neck, that's the proper way to adjust the action with those. Look for an allen screw on the plate on back of the guitar where the neck connects to the body. If the bolt plate has an allen screw, that's what it is. you loosen the screws, change the allen screw setting, tighten the neck again and check it. Check the manufacturer's website, they may have instructions for your specific guitar.

Oh, and the truss rod IS NOT the way to adjust the action. It's done by adjusting the bridge height or the neck pivot as noted above.

And one other you didn't mention,

Fret Grooves

I posted a picture of this a while back, it won't let me post the same pic again, and I don't have it on this computer to rename and repost, I'll try later on the other computer.

I wear grooves in the frets after playing a guitar for a few years and have to file and re-crown the frets. If you pull your bottom 3 strings aside, you'll probably see grooves in the frets if you have played it every day for a couple of years. These cause both buzzing and intonation problems, both because you are pushing the string down further to hit that groove. Then it either pulls the string out of tune or makes it too close to the next fret and it buzzes. This is the type buzz you have if it only happens on a couple of frets, usually close to the nut.

It can be cured by filing the tops of the frets down until the grooves are gone then filing a round top (crown) back on the fret. I've also seen an old 14" wood plane used, with sandpaper taped onto the bottom, it works great because it's long and covers a lot of neck at one time and it's flat. After a couple of filing jobs, the frets will be too thin and need replacement. I think my strat will only handle one more fret filing then I'll have to have it refretted, I've already filed it 3 times...It's called fret leveling.

Fret leveling may also be needed if the frets are not all the same height, a problem occasionally with cheaper guitars because the factory won't spend a few extra bucks to have it checked and done right to begin with..
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
^WOW! That was a brilliant post Pete. I've added this info with your name at the bottom of my original post seeing as it would take a ridiculously long time to put this in my own words. Many thanks to you and your glorious post Pete .
Last edited by FrenchyFungus at Jan 4, 2008,
#11
Thanks for the compliment, I just hope it can help some people out. I've been doing my own maintenance, repairs and modifications for 30 years since I don't like to let anyone else tinker with my guitars and have always believed if you want it done right, do it yourself. So I've learned by both research and screwing up...believe me screwing up teaches you lots quicker...I broke my first truss rod, these days I take great care dealing with them and adjust them ONLY if it's absolutely necessary, that's just one of the things I learned by screwing up...and not knowing what I was doing. Hell, I didn't even know it was called a truss rod, I just wondered what that screw was...when it snapped after a half turn I knew it wasn't supposed to be fooled with.

Edit: I renamed the fret picture, let's see if it lets me upload it. This is the only decent picture I got of a guitar I worked on 2 years ago for a local player, a 70's strat with years of grooves worn into the frets, some of the worst and depest grooves I've ever seen. This particular guitar also had some other major problems, including a broken piece at the base of the neck where it had been dropped, that I had to glue and clamp and cross my fingers...It took 3 hours of cleaning it was so grungy, but it's all better now and plays great, the fellow loved it.

These are the fret grooves noted above, if the site lets me upload the picture I'll be in good shape.

OK, it won't let me upload the picture, it says it's in This Thread Unfortunately I don't have one I can use to get another picture right now, I'd like to get a better quality shot, but that one will have to do for the moment.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jan 6, 2008,
#12
hey pete. i think this is going to help you, edge, and mark here in basics. i know you dont get as many set up questions here, but at least you'll be able to direct people.

if they are interested in setting their action, i see that you say, they might want to bring it to a shop.

did you want pictures to help do set ups here? or did you want to direct them to the EG set up page?

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=12225679#post12225679


let me know.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#13
Quote by Paleo Pete
Thanks for the compliment, I just hope it can help some people out. I've been doing my own maintenance, repairs and modifications for 30 years since I don't like to let anyone else tinker with my guitars and have always believed if you want it done right, do it yourself. So I've learned by both research and screwing up...believe me screwing up teaches you lots quicker...I broke my first truss rod, these days I take great care dealing with them and adjust them ONLY if it's absolutely necessary, that's just one of the things I learned by screwing up...and not knowing what I was doing. Hell, I didn't even know it was called a truss rod, I just wondered what that screw was...when it snapped after a half turn I knew it wasn't supposed to be fooled with.

Edit: I renamed the fret picture, let's see if it lets me upload it. This is the only decent picture I got of a guitar I worked on 2 years ago for a local player, a 70's strat with years of grooves worn into the frets, some of the worst and depest grooves I've ever seen. This particular guitar also had some other major problems, including a broken piece at the base of the neck where it had been dropped, that I had to glue and clamp and cross my fingers...It took 3 hours of cleaning it was so grungy, but it's all better now and plays great, the fellow loved it.

These are the fret grooves noted above, if the site lets me upload the picture I'll be in good shape.

OK, it won't let me upload the picture, it says it's in This Thread Unfortunately I don't have one I can use to get another picture right now, I'd like to get a better quality shot, but that one will have to do for the moment.

You seem a very talented person. I never like messing with the truss rod myself either. Its a serious problem if it snaps.
Fret grooves seem very nasty indeed.
Thanks again for your addition Pete
#14
did you want pictures to help do set ups here? or did you want to direct them to the EG set up page?


That's for the thread starter to decide not me, but I would think this is a repair issue and setup is...well, a setup issue...then again the setup page is 44 pages long, I don't think I want to go through the whole thing looking for info or pictures, but we'll see what the TS wants.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#15
Quote by jj1565
hey pete. i think this is going to help you, edge, and mark here in basics. i know you dont get as many set up questions here, but at least you'll be able to direct people.

if they are interested in setting their action, i see that you say, they might want to bring it to a shop.

did you want pictures to help do set ups here? or did you want to direct them to the EG set up page?

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=12225679#post12225679


let me know.

I think a link to that thread will be good instead of having pictures here. I've added the link at the bottom along with your name due to helping me out. Thanks
#16
yeah, ok, i offered cause i saw pete was looking to add a pic up there.
but all in all, nice idea and pm if you need any help with anything.

Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#17
Ben:

I like the link idea, that should work fine.

The pic I wanted to add was just a small one, and not really a very good shot of fret grooves, but it gives you the idea. I'll have to trudge throught eh setup thread sometime and see if it also has good pics of things like the neck relief and such, that would be hte main one I would like to see since it's difficult to describe what "just a little" backbow should look like.

But I'll be keeping an eye on this thread and try to help out when I can.

And thanks again for the compliments.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#18
Quote by Paleo Pete
Ben:

I like the link idea, that should work fine.

The pic I wanted to add was just a small one, and not really a very good shot of fret grooves, but it gives you the idea. I'll have to trudge throught eh setup thread sometime and see if it also has good pics of things like the neck relief and such, that would be hte main one I would like to see since it's difficult to describe what "just a little" backbow should look like.

But I'll be keeping an eye on this thread and try to help out when I can.

And thanks again for the compliments.

No problem Pete. If you give me a link to a fret grooves picture then I'll link it up there if you want.


If anyone else would like to add something that they think should go up here that I've missed then feel free to PM me or tell me in this thread. Thanks.
#19
A lot of ppl overlook fret leveling when talking about "buzzing" Many guitars (big names included) will not level the frets after they r installed. They rely on the straightness of the fret board itself and just dress and polish them.
A lot of the time the reason for "buzzing everywhere" is :uneven frets (it only takes a very slight difference in height to make a buzz) : slight upward bow where neck meets body : improper fret crowning

The main reason for the buzzing with these condition is this:--->
:When a string is struck, it vibrates in an oval pattern. The 12th fret being the exact center of the length of the string is where the string is oscillating the most when an open string is struck. This is also true for notes everywhere on the board. So frets need to be perfectly level with one another to avoid making unwanted contact with the vibrating string.

Even better is slight "fallaway" this were the height of each subsequent fret from headstock to body is slightly lower than the last (this is rare) what is very common is from the 12th fret up. (I do this to my guitars) This makes for easier bending and no "fretting-out"
These things coupled with bridge/tailpeice,saddle, and truss rod adjustments is how to get super low and QUIET action..
P.S. slight relief (upward bow) of the neck is desirable in most setups.....and I typed this one handed. lol ::type
#20
Quote by reversed mohawk
A lot of ppl overlook fret leveling when talking about "buzzing" Many guitars (big names included) will not level the frets after they r installed. They rely on the straightness of the fret board itself and just dress and polish them.
A lot of the time the reason for "buzzing everywhere" is :uneven frets (it only takes a very slight difference in height to make a buzz) : slight upward bow where neck meets body : improper fret crowning

The main reason for the buzzing with these condition is this:--->
:When a string is struck, it vibrates in an oval pattern. The 12th fret being the exact center of the length of the string is where the string is oscillating the most when an open string is struck. This is also true for notes everywhere on the board. So frets need to be perfectly level with one another to avoid making unwanted contact with the vibrating string.

Even better is slight "fallaway" this were the height of each subsequent fret from headstock to body is slightly lower than the last (this is rare) what is very common is from the 12th fret up. (I do this to my guitars) This makes for easier bending and no "fretting-out"
These things coupled with bridge/tailpeice,saddle, and truss rod adjustments is how to get super low and QUIET action..
P.S. slight relief (upward bow) of the neck is desirable in most setups.....and I typed this one handed. lol ::type


Thanks for the addition. I've added your 'fallaway' part as that seems like it could be very useful. I've also put your name at the bottom of the original post with the other guys too. Thanks again.
#22
are you having some sort of problem?
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#23
Quote by b14ck0u7
what about a guitar with a tremolo?

What about a guitar with tremelo?
I'm sorry but I don't understand.
#24
wut i mean is how would fix buzzing strings on a guitar with a tremolo considering theres no bridge like a LP, or SG that you can just take a screwdriver to
#25
Tremolo bridges can be adjusted at each individual saddle and overall height is adjusted by balance between spring and string tension. the bridge must be shimmed also to put it at close to desired height during this process.(bridge may fall slightly after shim is removed) The trick is to get an exact balance between the strings and springs. Im not sure if the same goes for floyd locking types, i dont have one.

P.S. If you dont use the tremolo you can "bottom it out" set spring tension to max (this might require additional springs, u can get these at any music store) This sets the bridge flat against the body and it stays in tune better. You might have to raise your saddles to compensate for the bridge being slightly lower.



12---shim
16---saddle
25---tension screw

There is also good free info online about this, google a few times and youll find something useful.
Last edited by reversed mohawk at Jan 23, 2008,
#26
you use a tiny allen wrench to lower the pegs on the front face of each saddle to raise that string.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#28
Quote by reversed mohawk
Tremolo bridges can be adjusted at each individual saddle and overall height is adjusted by balance between spring and string tension. the bridge must be shimmed also to put it at close to desired height during this process.(bridge may fall slightly after shim is removed) The trick is to get an exact balance between the strings and springs. Im not sure if the same goes for floyd locking types, i dont have one.

P.S. If you dont use the tremolo you can "bottom it out" set spring tension to max (this might require additional springs, u can get these at any music store) This sets the bridge flat against the body and it stays in tune better. You might have to raise your saddles to compensate for the bridge being slightly lower.



12---shim
16---saddle
25---tension screw

There is also good free info online about this, google a few times and youll find something useful.

Nice work
#29
I have a two or three frets on my guitar that seem to be a little higher than the rest which causes a slight buzzing on the A string. Example when I hold down at the 8th fret I get some buzzing at the 9th fret. I used a straight edge that spanned the distance of three frets to confirm that the fret was indead higher. Is this something I can fix my self or do I need to take it somewhere? Can I use the dowel rod and hammer technique to see if I can bump it down a little?
#30
Yes you can try to tap it down a little, just tap lightly. Use a hardwood dowel or small wood block and a small lightweight hammer, you don't want to beat it to death.

If that doesn't do it you may need a fret leveling done. It's not difficult but re-crowning them afterwards is tedious and you'll need the proper fret files for it. a good shop can do it for probably $30-40.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#31
Top thread, really helped me
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#32
Quote by human panda
Top thread, really helped me

You said something there.
#33
Hey.
Sorry but my internet was down for 3 weeks and I didn't get time to finish this. However, I got it now and will be finishing this off.
Thanks for all the comments people and remember that if you have any additions that you may want to add then just say. I'll see if its good: if it is then I'll add it to the posts with your name .
#37
I'm trying to determine if my fret buzz problem is really just me hitting the strings too hard, not pushing down hard enough or a legitimate fret buzz issue.

I've got a PRS Soapbar II with Ernie Ball Super Slinky's on it. I don't have much of an issue when I push down hard on the low E (and A) strings directly behind the frets. Of course that means that the string pressure I'm using between the lower strings and the higher strings is dramatically different. I did bring the guitar back for a tech to look at and in his opinion the guitar was setup well (though he slightly backed off the tension on the truss rod).

Basically I'm looking for an opinion on whether this is likely an equipment issue or mediocre technique. Is light fingerboard pressure plus striking the strings too hard a guaranteed recipe for fret buzz or should I look into having the action raised.
#38
Quote by Nalakram
I'm trying to determine if my fret buzz problem is really just me hitting the strings too hard, not pushing down hard enough or a legitimate fret buzz issue.


I'm having the same issue. However I'm pretty sure that I'm pushing hard enough. I have a Epi G-400 and the buzz is mainly around the 5th fret. Only really is an issue when doing power chords as well.
#39
NAlakram, it's probrobably just your technique. if you get fret buzz when barring a chord make sure to roll ur fretting finger a little.
you can raise the action a little to help, but if a tech isnt getting buzz that's a good indication that you can play buzz free too.

keep in mind buzz, not transmitted thru the amp , is generally not considered a problem.

king bud, slightly muted strings might lighten up a bit if you raise ur action slightly.
Jenneh

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Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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