#1
So i have a theory i haven't prototyped yet.

So higher output pickups have higher resistance around 15K right? That has a higher output so that contributes more gain to the amp. What would happen if i put a resistor (1-5K) in series with the pickup?

I think i would put it on the hot lead, because resistance to ground is always frowned upon. i think it would create a lightly fuzzy darker sound. There is no way that the output would increase but the tone would change. I think i would have it on a switch or a tone knob.

I have heard that old gibson's tone knobs and varitones had resistors in parallel with the capacitors.

Anyone put resistors with their caps or have any input on putting resistors in their circuits? What does resistance do to AC current waveforms?
#2
Fender Esquires have a resistor wired in to the circuit which AFAIK is what creates the 3rd 'dark' tone on the switch. Check out the schematic for them, it might make some sense to you if you know about that crap.
#3
The resister wont make the guitar signal hotter like a pickup with more windings. I have read about using a resistor for different balance on a tone circuit but its not used much.
#4
Quote by brentonlatour
So i have a theory i haven't prototyped yet.

So higher output pickups have higher resistance around 15K right? That has a higher output so that contributes more gain to the amp. What would happen if i put a resistor (1-5K) in series with the pickup?
Not much. Unless you:
Have a resistor in series with each pickup, then use 2 pickups together.
OR
Use your tone control.
Having any series resistance before the tone control
will make it much more effective at cutting the highs.
OR
Use an inferior cable with high capacitance.
Having a resistor in series will make it suck more of the highs.
Quote by brentonlatour
I think i would put it on the hot lead, because resistance to ground is always frowned upon. i think it would create a lightly fuzzy darker sound. There is no way that the output would increase but the tone would change. I think i would have it on a switch or a tone knob.
Interestingly, using a resistor in series with each pickup makes the sound smoother, when 2 pickups are used together.
Quote by brentonlatour
I have heard that old gibson's tone knobs and varitones had resistors in parallel with the capacitors.
The high value resistors were actually in series with each capacitor on the rotary switch. The switch then shorted out one of the resistors, and selected the appropriate capacitor. This reduced the clicking noise when operating the switch. An inductor was used in series with the selected capacitor, in the Varitone. This creates a notch filter.
Quote by brentonlatour
Anyone put resistors with their caps or have any input on putting resistors in their circuits?
There's a tiny stub of a conversation about that here: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/stockgibson.php
btw, they were discussing using 20k resistors in series with each pickup.
Quote by brentonlatour
What does resistance do to AC current waveforms?
It all depends on the other components involved (inductors and capacitors) and where each is, in the network. If you ONLY have resistors, they will only change the amplitude, but not the shape of the waveform.
Meadows
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#5
thank you for thoroughly dissecting my post. you posted so much on that it should be archived in the overkill section.

i will need to consider that i am going to do now, thank you