#1
i've been getting pretty serious about working on ear training. But i always just feel like i am guessing, rarely ever can i really hear something and know for sure and correctly what the interval is. and now my question.

is ear training like learning to talk or is it more like learning to play an instrument?
i mean is it intuative and its all hit and miss till one day your able to do it right, or is it more of an analytical feat?
#2
I'm still working on ear training, but I've found just tuning my guitar by ear has helped a lot. For me it was something that developed over time. I drop down a lot, so whenever I tune up I do it by ear. When I think I've got it, I check it with a tuner. Since I started doing that, I've been able to do more songs by ear. If you have a friend that plays an instrument, try and get them to play you a few notes and see if you can pick them out. If you own a keyboard or piano you can close your eyes and press one of the keys, then try to figure out what note it is (that's what I do sometimes). Keep working at it, it'll come to you. I make sure I dedicate some of my practice time to this, and I've seen a lot of progress. Good luck!
#3
^ that's a good way to go. Don't be discouraged if you can't learn dream theater in a few weeks or anything. You should start with simple stuff.
#4
thanks for the tips but it doesnt really answer the question of if it is more of an intuative thing or an analytical thing.

another example of what i mean is song writting (more intuative than anything (not to say it doesnt take practice and skill)) vs. guitar playing (a lot more technique and analyzing is involved)
#5
yes, somewhat. There is no correct way to do it so your not wrong. I'm also not a master of ear, but what helped me was.

Narrowing the options to two intervals(minor and major second or perfect fourth and perfect fifth). Then just focus on those two instead of all 12. Play the two intervals on your guitar repeatedly. Don't listen to the soundwaves, Listen to the *difference*. If you listen to the notes, some notes sound have more discord and you'll(or at least I did) mistake that for the different gaps. Fixing the root might help a bit too, but don't get dependent on it.

The most important thing, sing, hum, whatever. If you can hum a tune you can pretty much play it. So if you can hum intervals your over the hump. (good way to sing or hum intervals is with a tuner infront of you, so you can see what your singing). Along this note, there are certain songs tied to intervals, like happy birthday is a major second and jaws is a minor second.

random tips, and someone more experienced might help you more.
#8
something i do that has helped tremendously:
start by warming up singing, singing up and down the scale normally, in thirds, etc, with the arpeggio etc. After you've done this for a week or so, start trying to sing the intervals above the root, start with the basic 1 3 5 7, and their alterations, b3, b5, b7. Then eventually branch out to all the notes
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