#1
I mean, its just the strings vibrations being pick up by the pickups... How does the body wood fall into it? I know it changes the weight and look, but is that all your paying for in terms of wood?
#2
The grain character and density of different woods causes the guitar to resonate differently depending on what its made out of.

http://www.jemsite.com/jem/wood.htm
Gear:
Fender Standard HSS Strat w/ Tone Zone bridge
ESP Ltd EC-1k Black cherry
Carvin DC127 blackburst with Bareknuckle Warpigs
Peavey 6505+
#3
Different woods will also affect your sustain to a greater amount than they'd affect your tone.
Ibanez RGA121 | ESP LTD H-1000
Axe-FX Standard
#4
But the strings aren't touching the wood, they are touching the tuning pegs and the bridge, and the pickups are what are causing the sound to be made. Why would the wood increase resonance and sustain?
#6
Quote by DrNick
Different woods will also affect your sustain to a greater amount than they'd affect your tone.


I understand how different woods could colour your tone (mostly the neck) but imo: String stops = sound stops aka string signal path.
Wouldnt it be more on how it is set up? I mean it might happen but the question is has anyone actually tried this on two guitars that are exactly the same and set up exactly the same minus a different body wood and can actually tell a difference.
You might be able if your guitar was made from balsa wood but it just seems un-noticalby likely to me?
Im willing to be proven wrong, i just know a lot of wank goes around in audio to try and sell something.
I'm gonna live forever and if I don't suceed i'll die trying.
Originally posted by Liberation
Damn. You win Master Shake. I am not worthy!
Last edited by Master Shake at Jan 26, 2008,
#7
What are your tuning pegs attached to? The headstock.

Where is the headstock attached? The neck.

What is the neck attached to (whether by a bolt, glue, or by threading it through)? The body.

What is attached to the body? The bridge and the pickups.

When you strum a chord and hold it, the strings will continuously vibrate for a period of time. If you have a particularly resonant wood (something like a heavy slab of mahogany in a Les Paul), it'll vibrate a lot whenever the strings vibrate. In turn, the vibration of the wood will continue to make the strings vibrate. The pickups will pick up these cycles of vibration, and will keep your chord ringing out through your amp.
Ibanez RGA121 | ESP LTD H-1000
Axe-FX Standard
#8
Yes but how noticable is it is what im really asking, it doesnt exaclty shake like mad?

EDIT for the record im testing a rage of strats and a Les Paul
I'm gonna live forever and if I don't suceed i'll die trying.
Originally posted by Liberation
Damn. You win Master Shake. I am not worthy!
#9
It just requires a bit of logic.

As the strings vibrate, they transfer this into the wood. The wood resonates and so as you play a note, the whole guitar, every component, is vibrating. Obviously this means way the wood resonates changes how the strings will end up vibrating, leading to different characteristics when the signal is picked up.

Its quite simply that the vibration that CAUSES the sound is ingherently changed by the wood (and other components); thus the SOUND is different with different woods.

The thing is though, more expensive woods do not necisarrily give a better tone. Tone is, after all, subjective; who is to say plywood sounds worse than maple? People who think money = tone are who bring doubt to the whole thing. People assume if you can't hear a difference between mahogany and nato then the whole thing is false, but in reality that's just corksniffing elitism and marketing getting in the way of things.
Last edited by Vermintide at Jan 26, 2008,
#10
of course "logic" is not always accurate - people assuming that neck-throughs are superior in tone, for example, because of how they think resonance works.


But lots of people can tell a difference, and while there is individual variance between builds and slabs of wood, the "sound" of a particular would is consistent enough to be recognizable.
#11
Quote by Nick_

But lots of people can tell a difference, and while there is individual variance between builds and slabs of wood, the "sound" of a particular would is consistent enough to be recognizable.


So your saying if I/somone else posted a range of sound samples some people will be able to name what wood the body of my guitar would be?
If they can thats pretty amazing in my book (i dont mean that sarcastically either)
I'm gonna live forever and if I don't suceed i'll die trying.
Originally posted by Liberation
Damn. You win Master Shake. I am not worthy!
#12
^^^yup it's all about the velocity of sound.

But to answer your question, any resonant wood is gonna be okay. Everything else depends on your taste, hearing etc. Also, the wood, especially in electric, is not as important as the guitar in entirety. In a good guitar, everything is good including the wood. Every little bit helps. But is there need to use Brazilian Spruce in an electric guitar? NO. That would be bullsh*t and a waste of money. But do you need at the very least a "tonewood"? Yes, you do. basswood, mahagony, ash, koa, they're all good. You can't make a good sounding guitar with great hardware/electronics put into a plyboard body.

But if you interested, there have been a lot of proof of concept guitars made from really funky stuff.

EDIT: read your last post - no, people won't be able to tell what wood your using. Generally people can only tell if something sounds good or bad. And that of course, live or in recording, is what makes this whole thing an art and not a science.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#14
Quote by Master Shake
So your saying if I/somone else posted a range of sound samples some people will be able to name what wood the body of my guitar would be?
If they can thats pretty amazing in my book (i dont mean that sarcastically either)

No, it would depend far too much on other things.

If you could somehow bring in a sample where you had 3 clips of a guitar where ALL of the specs were identical except the wood, it's reasonable to say someone with a good ear could name them. Us players would hear a satisfying tonal difference, but naming would be a little far.

Of course, the average listener wouldn't notice a thing, which is why I heartily disapprove of guitars with pricetags like vintage cars.
Quote by BoredGuitarist7
But is it really that big of a difference to be paying money for?

Again, that's subjective is it not? If, for some reason, you happen to dislike the tone of all guitars other than a $5000 custom Gibson with wood made from the trees in the Forbidden Garden... It's worth it. If you happen to like the tone of a cardboard Squier, it's not worth it at all.
Last edited by Vermintide at Jan 26, 2008,
#15
a 10 top could be worth it imho but as long as it's quality material and in the general area of tone you want (ie: for a bassier fuller sound get basswood/mahagony/nato) you should be more then set and besides terms like mahagony are so broad they really don't carry any weight behind them, there are thousands of different kinds of mahagony and they all sound a bit different.
#16
Quote by DarkRaven03
The grain character and density of different woods causes the guitar to resonate differently depending on what its made out of.

http://www.jemsite.com/jem/wood.htm


+1
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Quote by Dempsey68
get a cheap marshall... my MG15DFX has a button that simulates the sound of one of the expensive tube marshall amps.