#1
Alright, so I'm making a guitar in my woods class. My original plan was to make a double neck but after I added everything up and figured out what i'd need to do, it was way to much work and way to much money for my first build. So, instead I went with a PRS McCarty design.
I am almost done designing the holes for pickups, bridge, battery box (for Fernandes Sustainer), and Control Cavity on the CNC Mill's program. And I'm probably going to post pictures starting after I get everything routed which will be around the end of next week or the beginning of the following week.
This is what i'm using for it-

Wood- Body is Mahogony
Top is Birdseye Maple

Pickups- Seymour Duncan SH-4
Seymour Duncan SH-2n
Fernandes Sustainer

Hardware- Wraparound Bridge (Chrome)
Gold Pickup Mounting Rings
Q-Parts Shell Dome knobs (Gold w/ purple abalone)
Dunlop Strap Locks (gold)
Grover Tuners

Extra Parts- Killswitch
Veneered Headstock

Neck- Ordered from Warmoth
Gold frets, Celtic cross inlays, Brazilian Rosewood fingerboard, Birdseye
back, 24 frets


So it should end up being an awesome guitar, but I've ran into a few problems.

I want to finish it and make it look like this:

But I don't know what I need to do to do that. Do I just stain it and clearcoat it?

Also, it would've have been a lot of money to have Warmoth finish the neck so that oils wouldn't penetrate the neck and warp the wood. I figured I could do that, so would I just use clear coat to do that?
If not, what would I use?

My final problem is that since it's going to be a curved body, I can't use a single coil mounting ring because it's not curved. I was talking to someone from a local guitar store about what I can do and he said something about using a sponge and then screwing the pickup into the body through the sponge. Is this right?
Does it work?
How exactly would I do it? (assuming it does work)
If it doesn't work what should I do for that?
Thanks
#2
Quote by drag_the_waters


My final problem is that since it's going to be a curved body, I can't use a single coil mounting ring because it's not curved. I was talking to someone from a local guitar store about what I can do and he said something about using a sponge and then screwing the pickup into the body through the sponge. Is this right?
Does it work?
How exactly would I do it? (assuming it does work)
If it doesn't work what should I do for that?
Thanks

I don't see why a sponge wouldn't work. It'd bend to conform to the curve, providing a somewhat level area to put it in... However, it might look sorta bad.
#3
granted your top already has that pattern (for lack of a better word) then yes, stain (if necessary) and clear coat should do it. if i have my facts straight.
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#4
Quote by BoredGuitarist7
I don't see why a sponge wouldn't work. It'd bend to conform to the curve, providing a somewhat level area to put it in... However, it might look sorta bad.


I could do it that way to, but like you say it'd probably look bad. The way the dude at the store made it sound is that you put it under the pickup so that you could adjust the height by releasing pressure from the sponge by loosening the screw a bit. And that you wouldn't see the sponge.
#5
the back is stained. but the front doesn't look like it is. IMO, birdseye maple is awesome, so just clearcoat. no stain. i would finish the back of the neck with lacquer, and then oil the fretboard. i don't really know about direct mount pickups... i have a pickguarded strat...
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#6
I don't think the back is stained on the guitar you posted. It looks like they just used a clear coat (either a polyurethane or nitrocellulose) only to let the natural wood shine through. The guitar I built for myself, I didn't use any stain. I shot nitrocellulose over curly maple and mahogany and what you see in the pictures you posted is what you get when you do that. They may have stained the maple top with a darker brown stain and then sanded off the excess to the point that it's almost not noticable. This "trick" is done to help make the figured maple more accentuated and dimensional. Normally, after sanding off most of the first coat of dark stain, another color (like blue for example) is then stained over it, then your clear coat. This is how you get that three dimensional look that is sooooo famous with quilted maple top guitars(and tiger maple, and curly maple, and etc). Good luck!
#7
Its sort of the way p90s are mounted. They use springs or a piece of foam under the pickup. So yea should work.
#8
Rub some Tung oil into the top before you clearcoat it to bring out the grain.
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#9
No, shellac is the ultimate way to bring out grain.
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#10
Quote by Tackleberry
Its sort of the way p90s are mounted. They use springs or a piece of foam under the pickup. So yea should work.

Yeah, I think a lot of bass pickups are mounted this way too.
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