#1
Ok, so this might be a basic question, but I have only really just started learning theory (3 years too late I might add) and I really like the sound of a guitar in drop d playing power chords and a second guitar playing octaves on top.

What I want to know, it what is the theory behind this? What octaves do you play over which power chords? I have looked at the tabs of bands using this technique and there seems to be no obvious pattern.

I'm really stuck on this one.....
My Gear:

Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR (EMG 85/81)
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Deuce
LOPO Custom 2x12 (Celestion V30s)
#2
just play around with it a little bit, find a couple of notes that sound good on top of the power chord and mess a round with them.
#5
I'm not sure I understand the question, but to play an octave, you just play the same note an octave higher. So, if you play a low D5 power chord (in drop D) on one guitar, you would then just play the D on the G string 7th fret and the D on the high e string 10th fret on the second guitar.
#6
^ no, im asking what octaves (as in the root and the octave) would sound good over certain powerchords and what the theory behind it is
My Gear:

Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR (EMG 85/81)
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Deuce
LOPO Custom 2x12 (Celestion V30s)
#8
considering a power chord exists of a prime, perfect fifth and an octave it's not that hard to think it sounds good. But to be honest I don't understand yoru question so heres some random advice.

Option 1: you play even an octave higher

e-----------
B------10---
G------9----
D---7--7----
A---5-------
E---5-------


as you can see: AEA and AEA an octave higher.

Option 2
They Play Octaves of Notes within the powerchords.

e-------------[ 9]---
B-----[10]----[14]---
G-----[14]----( 7)---
D-----(7)-----(12)---
A-----(12)----{ 5}---
E-----{5}-----{10}---
       A        D


Numbers in same kind of brackets are the same octave


Above you can see the location of certain octaves. This can be done with any other note that sound OK with the A5 chord.

To bad I'm not really sure about what sounds good with a certain power chord. I believe it had something to do with chord progressions and modes and stuff, but that's where theory gets a little blurry for me.

I'm sure about the octave stuff using the fifth of a power chord though. Simply because it's in the chord that will work.

Hope It was a little help


TdM
Last edited by pandora_grunt at Jan 27, 2008,
#9
Quote by branny1982
^that makes no sense, what ibason wrote was correct.

It is my question....i think I know what he said is not right.

I dont want to play an octave higher than the power chord. I don't think understand what I am saying.

Listen to Famous Words by My Chemical Romance and Misery Business by paramore.

One guitar is playing power chords and the other is playing octaves but it's more of a harmony, they aren't just playing an octave above.
My Gear:

Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR (EMG 85/81)
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Deuce
LOPO Custom 2x12 (Celestion V30s)
#10
i think you should consider learning what an octave is, then perhaps restructure your question.
what about - "how do My Chemical Romance get that cool '2 guitar sound' on their songs?"

i think the answer is that the guitars are harmonised, perhaps in 3rds or 6ths etc.

Would you like information on this?
#11
Ok octave.....

E - - - - - - - - - -
B - - - - - - - - - -
G - - 9 - 9 - - - -
D - - - - - - - - - -
A - - 7 - 7 - - - -
D - - - - - - - - - -

Playing E and E an octave above.

I want to know which power chords you can play with them, which sound good together?

I am sorry if my question is not clear, this is as clear as I can make it
My Gear:

Schecter Hellraiser C-1 FR (EMG 85/81)
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Deuce
LOPO Custom 2x12 (Celestion V30s)
#12
Quote by tabber666
^ no, im asking what octaves (as in the root and the octave) would sound good over certain powerchords and what the theory behind it is

In reality, playing octaves over powerchords is just playing 2 of the same single notes, so playing any scale pattern or lick in the given key could be played in octaves.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#13
I think hes talking about the second guitar playing octaves above a powerchord, but the octaves are a note different than that of the powerchord for example

e-7-
b-0-
g-X-
d-5-
a-5-
e-3-

This is guitar 1 playing a G powerchord on strings 4, 5, and 6, while guitar 2 plays a B and its octave on strings 1 and 2.

Is this what you were referring too?
#14
I understand what youre trying to say.. but youre asking the wrong question. Understand thirds, and fifths, etc. and youll be able to beef up your chords by adding HARMONIES. Adding a cheesy octave onto a drop d power chord isnt the best way to go about writing music though

*edit.. unless you really like blink 182
myspace.com/soundsofmeta
#15
anything sounds good if you're in the same key and you don't play seconds or 7ths, or at least try to avoid them as they are very dissonant.
#16
He's basically saying if you play a power chord, eg:
D||-3-
A||-3-
E||-1-
what octave would sound good played over that power chord, eg.
G||-3-
D||---
A||-3-
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables
#17
No you people are wrong. He is not asking how to play octaves.. He knows that much. He more wants to know how to create two-guitar harmonies. The lower guitar plays powerchords and the higher guitar plays octaves.
#18
You could play the third. If your playing a D5 power chord (d and a) you could play the third (f# on the 4th string 4th fret and f# on the 2nd string 7th fret). Or and f natural for a d minor chord. Do you know how to build triads?
#19
ok, i understand what the man is asking, he wants to know about a second guitar playing an octave over power chords being played on the first. I like to have the second guitar play the octave that is a perfect 5th above the power chord,
like


1st guitar 2nd guitar
d--7---- G--9
a--7---- D--9
e--5---- A--7

I like to do this for a good chunky, punk sound
I'm gonna get my own amusement park, with black jack and hookers. you know what, screw the amusement park -bender, futurama
#20
Well it is very simple.. it is breaking up the guitar into rhythm and lead.. kind of. The rhythm is playing a certain progression and the lead is playing some melody using octaves over that progression. Constructing music from this is just like constructing any melody, except the melody is harmonized in octaves.
#21
Quote by ouchies
Well it is very simple.. it is breaking up the guitar into rhythm and lead.. kind of. The rhythm is playing a certain progression and the lead is playing some melody using octaves over that progression. Constructing music from this is just like constructing any melody, except the melody is harmonized in octaves.


So very simple counterpoint?

The rhythm is like the bass notes, with the melody playing contrapuntal lines, with one note per every bass note.
#22
dont know why nobody has mention this. unless it has been.

but make sure you are playing lead octaves that are in the same key as the rythm.

nearly any of the octaves in the scale will sound decent over the rythm.

rise against use this type of playing regualry.

(drop d riffs, with octaves playing lead)
#23
An octave is two of the same notes, just played at a different octave. If they're the same notes, then if one would fit than the other would fit. It would be like playing two of every note, though one of them is just high.

Because of this, as someone said earlier, the theory would be the exact same as a single melody line, you'll just make it sound more fancy and I'm guessing it'll sound pretty metal-y.

Someone basically said this before, so sorry for being redundant.