#1
So latley I've noticed that my stand in guitar (while I have the other one adjusted) can't hold a tune worth a damn. I've noticed that at the end of playing for even 5 minutes it will have tuned all the strings down to at least a flat, but while I'm playing it's not always apparent. So my question is, if I keep playing with a tuned down guitar but am not aware of it, will I eventually think that all these flats are the natural notes, and have my perception of the notes damaged, or will that not happen. Also, if it DID happen, would I be able to re-train my ear so that it perceives notes properly?
#2
Unless you have perfect pitch, note perception is relative. So as long as the strings are de-tuned equally (so the intervalic relationships are the same between strings) you should be fine. When you get a fully-tuned guitar you'll notice the difference, but other than a bit of adjusting you can't really permanently damage your musical ear.

But, then again you could just tune the thing yourself
#3
Quote by HammerAndSickle
Unless you have perfect pitch, note perception is relative. So as long as the strings are de-tuned equally (so the intervalic relationships are the same between strings) you should be fine. When you get a fully-tuned guitar you'll notice the difference, but other than a bit of adjusting you can't really permanently damage your musical ear.

But, then again you could just tune the thing yourself

Alright, thanks, they don't really untune evenly, but I do try to tune it myself, it can just take me a while to notice it's lost it's tune, and now that I've caught on I've been so paranoid I'd screw up my note perception I spend all my time tuning the thing, strumming it a few times and then checking to see it's still in tune. Not a whole lot of fun .
#4
Well if this did damage your perception, then playing again with a tuned guitar would, only logically, correct this problem.
#5
Thanks Isaac, that would make sense, can't believe I couldn't come to that on my own :P. HammerandSickle, I'm just curious, if it wouldn't damage a perception if they were all equally out of tuen, what would happen if they weren't?
#6
If they're all out of tune by the same amount, they're still in tune with each other, what he's saying is that you won't notice the difference unless you have perfect pitch, because you'll just see each note as an interval away from another, and those intervals will be the same whatever the pitch of the notes you're working with.

If they're out of tune by different amounts, the intervals will be different, so you could start to get the wrong idea of what each interval sounds like.