#1
Yo, I've been researching new bass gear lately and I'm a little confused at what I'm looking at here:

https://www.carvinguitars.com/products/single.php?product=SBR410


Obviously it says 600watts, which is great for the price, and Carvin makes great gear from what I've been reading, but I'm a little confused if they're just talking about the amp, or if the amp and the cabinet will output 600watts together. The cab is rated for 800watts at 8ohms, but the amp is rated at 600watts at 4 ohms. I'm not sure what I'm looking at.

So educate me, will this bundle give me 600watts of output?

background: I play a lot of prog-metal, punk, and jazz, so I definitely need something versatile. My rig needs to be able to handle medium sized gigs in bars and clubs, with the occasional backyard show.

any suggestions of other gear is welcome too. I'm looking to spend <$800 on gear.
#2
No, the bundle will not give you 600 watts, which is the BX600's capability at 2 ohms by the way. It'll give you 250 watts. Carvin's 8 ohm 410 is the dumbest thing ever. I would recommend this:
https://www.carvinguitars.com/products/single.php?product=SBX210
For only $100 more you get 400 watts and neodymium magnets which are the wave of the future. It's a far superior stack in my opinion.
#3
I think you get 800Watts out of it.
The head rates 800W@8ohms bridged and the cabinet is rated at 8ohm.
I'm not sure about that though, it's perfectly possible that Jazz_rock_feel is right.
Maruszczyk Frog 6 custom -> TC electronic Polytune-> Markbass CMD mini 121 + Markbass traveler 121H

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#6
The head has two power amps in it. Power amps=WATTS!!! So when you have two power amps you can run it three ways: the first way is bi-amped. This means that one power amp is taking all frequencies below xHz and another is taking all frequencies above xHz and sending them to their respective low and high cabs (usually a low cab is 115 or 118 and a high cab is 210 or 410). The second way is dual-mono mode. The two power amps are split up but one takes the signal and sends it to it's specific cab and the other sends the signal to a different cab. The difference between this and biamping is that they don't split the signal but have the full sgnal to each power amp. The last way is bridged mode and this means the two power amps work as one and functions as a single unit. The sends the full range of sound to both cabinets.
#7
AHAHAHAHA I KNOW WHAT BRIDGED MEANS! NANA NANA BOO BOO!

Basically, there are 2 power amps in that head. Two separate power amps with 2 separate inputs and volumes and impedencies and all that stuff. You can hook up a set of speaker cabinetry up to each power amp via each jack - essentially, you'll be running both power amps in parallel. Not actually true, but they're both running independantly at the same time. You can get them to both push out the entire signal, or you can get them to run in stereo - one side below a crossover point, one above. This gives a clear tone, but it looses a bit of midrange presence and having certain notes come out of certain speakers a bit strange to the ear.

HOWEVER

BRIDGING is a different story. Basically, mono-bridging is essentially running both power amps in series. You run 1 power amp through another. When you run speaker cabs in series, you double the ohms - in parallel, you half them. The same thing applies to the power amps. The power amps run in series, and the ohms double. That is, you're getting 1200W at essentially double the ohms.

What am I talking about?

The power amps run at 600W on the BX1200 at 2 ohms individually. But, when you run them in series (mono-bridge), you get 1200W from 2 600W power amps, each running at 2 ohms. But since they're both running at 2 ohms and are hooked up in series, the rating doubles - now it's 4 ohms. Got it?

So, basically folks, running the head in 1200W mono bridge is just running both power amps at 2 ohms. I doubt mono-bridge would sound much louder than dual mono at 2 ohms per channel, but to get that, you'd need FOUR 4-ohm cabs or EIGHT 8-ohm cabs. In mono bridge, you just need 1 4-ohm cab or 2 8 ohm cabs. Basically, it's not for volume - it's for getting maximum power out of the least amount of cabs (conceptually).
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#8
Quote by thefitz
AHAHAHAHA I KNOW WHAT BRIDGED MEANS! NANA NANA BOO BOO!

Basically, there are 2 power amps in that head. Two separate power amps with 2 separate inputs and volumes and impedencies and all that stuff. You can hook up a set of speaker cabinetry up to each power amp via each jack - essentially, you'll be running both power amps in parallel. Not actually true, but they're both running independantly at the same time. You can get them to both push out the entire signal, or you can get them to run in stereo - one side below a crossover point, one above. This gives a clear tone, but it looses a bit of midrange presence and having certain notes come out of certain speakers a bit strange to the ear.

HOWEVER

BRIDGING is a different story. Basically, mono-bridging is essentially running both power amps in series. You run 1 power amp through another. When you run speaker cabs in series, you double the ohms - in parallel, you half them. The same thing applies to the power amps. The power amps run in series, and the ohms double. That is, you're getting 1200W at essentially double the ohms.

What am I talking about?

The power amps run at 600W on the BX1200 at 2 ohms individually. But, when you run them in series (mono-bridge), you get 1200W from 2 600W power amps, each running at 2 ohms. But since they're both running at 2 ohms and are hooked up in series, the rating doubles - now it's 4 ohms. Got it?

So, basically folks, running the head in 1200W mono bridge is just running both power amps at 2 ohms. I doubt mono-bridge would sound much louder than dual mono at 2 ohms per channel, but to get that, you'd need FOUR 4-ohm cabs or EIGHT 8-ohm cabs. In mono bridge, you just need 1 4-ohm cab or 2 8 ohm cabs. Basically, it's not for volume - it's for getting maximum power out of the least amount of cabs (conceptually).




Excellent stuff. I learned a lot.
#9
Quote by IndianRockStar


Excellent stuff. I learned a lot.

Yeah, well there you go. Mono-bridging is a really 'smart' and 'economical' way to get a lot of power to a little bit of cabs in 2-power amp systems. But it's a strange tradeoff - power 1 power amp and get 400W, or power both and get 1200W. That said, there aren't many cabs can handle 1200W by themselves. You'd typically need 2 (although Carvin makes one that does). And when you have 2, you can then decide how you want it set up - get 800W via dual-mono or stereo, or get 1200W from mono bridge - both requiring 2 cabs (typically).
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..