#2
not even a little bit.

capacitors generally store miniscule amounts of charge and recharge and discharge super fast
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#3
Not only wil it not work, it will probably introduce lots of hum and could damage the pickups. That's a circuit, remember, add a battery it is not designed for and you're introducing a much higher electrical current than it is designed to handle. Sounds like trouble to me...

What are you trying to do? If you want different tonal capabilities for your guitar, you can change the cap for a different value to allow it to filter more or less treble, that's about it. Batteries should only be used with active electronics that require batteries.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#4
I'm talking about uncharged ones, and I felt like it wouldn't work. And anyways, it was just a crazy idea that occurred to me and I figured I'd throw it out there. Oh well...
#5
You could maybe experiment with pickups you're willing to ruin and lower voltage button batteries. But i'd just stick to caps.
Call me Roche.

Quote by Dyers
wut is a luthier? im assuming it has to do with the luthern church
#6
Try the TBX tone control. It's a kit from Fender for, like, $16. It uses a special pot and special pot configuration to filter treble when turned one way and filter bass when turned the other, with the middle being 'normal'.
#7
Quote by Paleo Pete
Not only wil it not work, it will probably introduce lots of hum and could damage the pickups. That's a circuit, remember, add a battery it is not designed for and you're introducing a much higher electrical current than it is designed to handle. Sounds like trouble to me...


Yeah a battery would add voltage and current, which would mess up the values of every other resistor in the circuit. Thats bad! Also, adding that much current may even cause some of the resistors to overheat or not function properly. It's best to just use the right tool (or in your case capacitor) for the job.
Enjoi <--- Friend me
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Otter, you're my new god.
#8
Quote by flashbandit
I'm talking about uncharged ones, and I felt like it wouldn't work. And anyways, it was just a crazy idea that occurred to me and I figured I'd throw it out there. Oh well...


Connect a discharged battery in parallel with your guitar signal, and your signal will try to charge the battery. I'd be surprised if much of the signal actually makes it to your amp. If you use a battery or cell that has some charge, I expect it to bias the preamp of your amp, which would probably ruin your tone, if you hear anything at all. It probably wouldn't destroy anything, since most amp inputs are high impedance, and a few volts isn't going to be able to push enough current to damage anything.

I like crazy ideas, though. All the greatest inventors were insane