#1
... abstract noun?

Could someone give me a definition and example?
It's the one bastard keeping from achieving an A* in English work at the minute.
R E G G A E
#3
An abstract noun refers to states, events, concepts, feelings, qualities, etc., that have no physical existence.

eg: Freedom; happiness; idea; music are all abstract nouns that have no physical existence.

An abstract noun can be either a countable noun or uncountable noun. Abstract nouns that refer to events are almost usually countable: a noise; a meeting.
#4
Quote by fullarton
An abstract noun refers to states, events, concepts, feelings, qualities, etc., that have no physical existence.

eg: Freedom; happiness; idea; music are all abstract nouns that have no physical existence.

An abstract noun can be either a countable noun or uncountable noun. Abstract nouns that refer to events are almost usually countable: a noise; a meeting.


R E G G A E
#5
in latin, they are often feminine nouns of the third declension

eg humanitas humanitatis.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
#6
Quote by Gurgle!Argh!
in latin, they are often feminine nouns of the third declension

eg humanitas humanitatis.

Yes, I agree...


Cam Sampbell's my hero
#7
Abstract nouns are the opposite of concrete nouns. Tree is a concrete noun, propriety is abstract.
VENUSIAN
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Patterns In The Ivy present ethnicity on an intriguing and dedicated level. ~Ambient Exotica
A mesmeric melange of yearning voice, delicate piano and carefully chosen samples. ~Lost Voices
#8
Quote by Gurgle!Argh!
in latin, they are often feminine nouns of the third declension

eg humanitas humanitatis.



Yes but English is Germanic, no feminine noun endings
#9
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Yes but English is Germanic, no feminine noun endings


shame, no?

i'm just bringing the classics to the UG masses. break it down.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.