#1
I just pulled out my dad's old suzuki acoustic that he got 25+ years ago today, and am really looking to repair pretty much the entire guitar. The black finish has gotten to be severely scratched over the years, so I've decided to sand it all off, and refinish it. I started with the back today (pictures to come), and the original wood is in great shape. I'm pretty sure it's mahogany or cedar.

Since the wood is still in great shape, my question is, how would I go about adding a clear -- maybe polyurethane? -- finish on it? I really want to do it myself, since I'm on a budget...but what materials would I need?
#2
Check the guitar reranch
the internet is full of infos on how to paint your own guitar
#3
Inflating a balloon in the soundhole will prevent sprays and drips from getting inside. Just pop it after everything is dry.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Finishing_supplies/Finishes_and_solvents/ColorTone_Essential_Finishing_Kit.html

Or if you want to go all out: http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Finishing_supplies/Finishes_and_solvents/1/Stringed_Instrument_Lacquer.html
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#4
thanks guys.
Another question about this...
I just bought a new bridge for the guitar, but how would I go about removing the old one and putting the new one on?
#6
Quote by runkidrun06
thanks guys.
Another question about this...
I just bought a new bridge for the guitar, but how would I go about removing the old one and putting the new one on?

A new bridge, or a new saddle?
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#7
a new bridge...but I already removed it. I'm gonna post some pictures up later.

I completely removed the bridge and the finish off the guitar. It looks a lot better than the crappy black finish that was dented and scratched everywhere, and the bridge that had a giant crack down the middle.
Removing the bridge wasn't as hard as I thought it was going to be. I went for a different method than steaming and prying.. I planed most of the wood, then, sanded the rest of the bridge with a really low grain sandpaper.
#8
Quote by runkidrun06
a new bridge...but I already removed it. I'm gonna post some pictures up later.

I completely removed the bridge and the finish off the guitar. It looks a lot better than the crappy black finish that was dented and scratched everywhere, and the bridge that had a giant crack down the middle.
Removing the bridge wasn't as hard as I thought it was going to be. I went for a different method than steaming and prying.. I planed most of the wood, then, sanded the rest of the bridge with a really low grain sandpaper.

That method certainly works if you're refinishing the guitar. The steaming and prying method is mostly for bridge-specific repairs.

Did you go ebony or rosewood with the bridge? Get any new pins? Bone saddle and pins is always a plus; you'll definitely notice a difference in the sound.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#10
My opinion which you may disregard if you'd like:

Removing the finish was really a terrible idea. As guitars age, the finish hardens and dries, improving the sound. Even with scratches, the old finish probably helped the sound hugely. If you look for any high-dollar (or not, for that matter) old acoustic, you will find that many have heavily worn finishes with bare spots and such. This is precisely why luthiers try NOT to re-finish bodies. The good sound comes (somewhat) from the old finish.

Another danger in sanding down to bare wood is that you can alter the wood thickness, potentially harming the sound and structural integrity of the instrument.


But on the other hand, you didn't start with a prewar Martin, and from what you're describing, it sounds like it was in pretty bad disrepair. My best advice is to take a lot of time and apply the finish carefully. Make sure to fill all the grain holes and voids. I hope it turns out well.