#1
I have just recently began learning music theory and I am using a recommended book as a means of learning. Anyway, I have begun learning the major scale throughout the entire neck, and it teaches you by giving a diagram of what frets are to be played in each "shape" of the scale along the neck.
Now, this is not really much of a problem, but I have often heard users here say not to just learn scales and shapes, learn the notes that you need to be playing; does this mean that I should just avoid learning scale shapes of boxes period or just learn them to the extent that I know each note that I am playing whilst going through the scales?

Thanks for any help. Sorry if this question seems a bit aweful, I've only just begun learning.
#2
learning scale shapes all up the neck is incredibly useful. But to really understand what you are doing, it is helpful to know the notes.

You should at least be able to find any note on the low E-string. You should be able to find every octave of a note on all strings. Also, try to play scales on only one string so that you understand the intervals.

None of that is really very hard with practice.

Hope I helped.
#3
Quote by Paquijón
does this mean that I should just avoid learning scale shapes of boxes period or just learn them to the extent that I know each note that I am playing whilst going through the scales?
.


NO !!!!!! Dont avoid learning anything. Knowing the patterns and shapes on the neck can only help you. Dont let anyone tell you otherwise.
#4
learn the pattern for having the root on each string..

then connect them... get it so you can run 2-3 octaves..

then youll be starting to get it
Quote by King Twili
It's just me and Doris here ;_;



Quote by Zaphikh
Poops is the chat MC - but here we know him as Early Cuyler.


Free Downloads, Yo!
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
NO !!!!!! Dont avoid learning anything. Knowing the patterns and shapes on the neck can only help you. Dont let anyone tell you otherwise.


Definitely correct. But you can do both. While playing box shapes, think about what notes you are playing. Sure it would be great if you could just memorize where every single note is, but that's impractical, as it wouldn't really show you the relationships, which is the most important part of all.

Plus, with the attitude that you don't want to just learn shapes, you probably will make an effort (conscious or unconscious) to learn the actual notes, so you shouldn't have to worry about that.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#6
Wow, I really appreciate you all clearing this up for me and giving me suggestions. Believe it or not the process of learning music theory is a bit daunting, having heard so many times the myth that it may cause me to become "stuck" or sound generic, etc. Thus I approach it with so much weariness as to ask this question, haha. Thank you again.
#7
Quote by Paquijón
Wow, I really appreciate you all clearing this up for me and giving me suggestions. Believe it or not the process of learning music theory is a bit daunting, having heard so many times the myth that it may cause me to become "stuck" or sound generic, etc. Thus I approach it with so much weariness as to ask this question, haha. Thank you again.


The only way you will get stuck from learning music theory is if you only learn a tiny bit of it. Once you break through the simple things, you can move on to much more creative chord progressions with crazy substitutions, while, at the same time, writing unique solos to those progressions.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#8
Box positions are extremely useful, but you improve so dramatically when you learn how to switch between all of them and use the entire fretboard as one giant "box."

Remember, scales are collections of notes, not positions, patterns, or boxes. However, all of those things can be very useful.

You might want to read this. It covers basic theory.
#9
To stop getting boxed in you should not only learn the shape of as many scales as possible, but you should also start learning modes now. Then you'll REALLY be free to move over the entire neck without any restraints.
#10
Quote by Paquijón
Wow, I really appreciate you all clearing this up for me and giving me suggestions. Believe it or not the process of learning music theory is a bit daunting, having heard so many times the myth that it may cause me to become "stuck" or sound generic, etc. Thus I approach it with so much weariness as to ask this question, haha. Thank you again.


Yeah. it is understandably daunting. Plus here you get alot of opinions....." dont do this" .... "you MUST do that".... The truth is you should learn as much as you can. Learn the notes, the intervals, the patterns / positions. Each thing you learn reinforces the next.
#12
A few years ago I learned the shapes of the scales and chords and the way they linked up the neck, and I still never wired figuring out what note is where without doing some calculating in my head.

Knowing the notes in a scale or chord and where they are on the fretboard will change things for you.

I recently found advanced fret pro at cnet.com in the download section for free or a donation. Its making a huge difference. I've memorized a lot more reference points by doing this every morning and every night. A bonus is you can isolate specific strings and frets with this program unlike fretboard warrior but it has no sound.
#13
To stop getting boxed in you should not only learn the shape of as many scales as possible, but you should also start learning modes now. Then you'll REALLY be free to move over the entire neck without any restraints.


Modes won't increase your ability to move around the neck. I recommend not worrying about modes at all until you know the major scale inside and out.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Box positions are extremely useful, but you improve so dramatically when you learn how to switch between all of them and use the entire fretboard as one giant "box."

Remember, scales are collections of notes, not positions, patterns, or boxes. However, all of those things can be very useful.

You might want to read this. It covers basic theory.

yeah, i think of the guitar as one big box, just octaves and octaves of the scale, but only got to that point by becoming extremly comforatable with my instrument.

I remember being "stuck" in box patterns for a very long time, but by doing that I really learned how to do so much with one scale, that i feel it helped me out in the long run

For me i don't think in notes exactly, more like my hear knows if a half step or whole step is going to sound good, but at the same time i do know what note i am playing
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Jan 29, 2008,
#15
if you learn the scales and basics of music theory first, then you can tweak them to your own usage, changing them to fit your own styles
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.