#1
Hi Ive Been Trying To Do Some Improv Solos Like Slash But all that comes out is scales i cant do anythin else just scales can someone help cos its reallly annoying what do i do???
#2
forget about scales and use your ears
dont worry about runs
and just feel your your way around the neck
#4
Quote by smokymountain m
forget about scales and use your ears
dont worry about runs
and just feel your your way around the neck


ugh, the whole "forget theory/scales etc and just feel it" worst advice we hear around here.

slash uses scales, you use scales too right? well chances are you're just running up and down scales which is generally very non musical in nature. you want to use scales initially but don't just run up and down them. i recommend learning some actual theory to find out what would work well. also learning some solos that you like from multiple guitarists, the more you learn others stuff the more you'll start to see that they're not just running up and down a scale.
#5
Quote by smokymountain m
forget about scales and use your ears
dont worry about runs
and just feel your your way around the neck


yeah ignore that guy chances are he cant play for ****, u need to use the scales as a basis for your harmonic construction.

You need to develop your skills as an improvisational musician, your not gonna be able to play like slash straight away, in fact it will take years to get that good.

Start by playing small simple phrases in time with the music, so two or three notes that go according to the scale. Then adjust the lick by adding slides, hammer-ons, bends or any other techniques u know. Gradually expand this to other places on the neck until u can move more freely. Learn other solos aswell to see how the ebst players construct them, but dont be too ambitious to start with.

Take it slow and u'll get there, and ignore anyone that says "You just gotta play with ure ears and your soul man". This advice applies only to advanced guitarists who already have an array of soloing techniques down but are over-complicating things.
#6
Quote by z4twenny
ugh, the whole "forget theory/scales etc and just feel it" worst advice we hear around here.

slash uses scales, you use scales too right? well chances are you're just running up and down scales which is generally very non musical in nature. you want to use scales initially but don't just run up and down them. i recommend learning some actual theory to find out what would work well. also learning some solos that you like from multiple guitarists, the more you learn others stuff the more you'll start to see that they're not just running up and down a scale.



Cool so im not broken!
Where do i learn this theory stuff any recomendations for like books or websites? cheers
#7
^ um, ultimate-guitar.com seems to be a pretty good sight, might wanna check there.....

Atreideslegend is definately on the right path here, it helps to have a bag o' licks to pull from when you decide to improv initially so that when someone is playing something you can say "ok thats in E minor pentatonic, i know this and this and this will all fit over it" then you can take those licks and use variants of them to get a good sound. once you start getting to where you can do this easily then you can get into more advanced stuff such as melodic control (check google videos for marty friedmans video on this, i recommend it to everyone after they've been improv'ing for a while, the idea is genius and simple in its most basic form)

edit: you might want to watch the melodic control video just to see what its all about, but i don't recommend trying it right away, it sounds like you still need some practice and time under your belt before you attempt this as it can be a little maddening to a beginner (i've been playing for 12 years and although the idea wasn't foreign to me it did take me a bit to get used to it)
#8
If you want a "quick & dirty" approach to actually begin to understand how to
use scales more musically, learn how to ascend and descend a scale in the triads
that are formed from the scale.

Your problem, as with many others who ask the same question, is that you have
limited your approach to practice scales to just a single musical concept -- which is
ascending and desceding 2nds (or "going up and down the scale"). It's a perfectly
good concept, but used all the time is quickly very dull.

The beauty of triads is that they are also the basis for forming all the chords in the
key and they almost always sound musical and interesting and non-scalelike in
even the most simple lines that use them.
#9
Quote by z4twenny
^ um, ultimate-guitar.com seems to be a pretty good sight, might wanna check there.....

Atreideslegend is definately on the right path here, it helps to have a bag o' licks to pull from when you decide to improv initially so that when someone is playing something you can say "ok thats in E minor pentatonic, i know this and this and this will all fit over it" then you can take those licks and use variants of them to get a good sound. once you start getting to where you can do this easily then you can get into more advanced stuff such as melodic control (check google videos for marty friedmans video on this, i recommend it to everyone after they've been improv'ing for a while, the idea is genius and simple in its most basic form)

edit: you might want to watch the melodic control video just to see what its all about, but i don't recommend trying it right away, it sounds like you still need some practice and time under your belt before you attempt this as it can be a little maddening to a beginner (i've been playing for 12 years and although the idea wasn't foreign to me it did take me a bit to get used to it)



Ive been playing 8 years so ill take a look at it
#10
Quote by Synthister
Hi Ive Been Trying To Do Some Improv Solos Like Slash But all that comes out is scales i cant do anythin else just scales can someone help cos its reallly annoying what do i do???


Do you know any Slash licks or solos?

A common problem for alot of people is that they learn a few scales, even some theory, but dont spend anytime learning actual licks or solos. I agree with those above that said to learn the scales and study theory, however I would strongly recommend that you balance that study with playing some actual music. Learn a few Slash solos. Copy them as closely as you can. You will gain alot from this including technique, feel, phrasing...... basically you will absorb what Slash did. If you do that AND study theory you will be that much better.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 29, 2008,
#11
The best way to learn good phrasing is to transcribe solos. Learn them by ear instead of tab, learn what they sound like; play by ear, and not turning off and running the patterns but consciously forcing yourself to play what you hear. Sing the notes you play as you play them.

It's never too early to develop your ear and sense of melody. Far too many leave it too late or never do it at all.
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
Do you know any Slash licks or solos?

A common problem for alot of people is that they learn a few scales, even some theory, but dont spend anytime learning actual licks or solos. I agree with those above that said to learn the scales and study theory, however I would strongly recommend that you balance that study with playing some actual music. Learn a few Slash solos. Copy them as closely as you can. You will gain alot from this including technique, feel, phrasing...... basically you will absorb what Slash did. If you do that AND study theory you will be that much better.


I second this. Vastly more important than the scale you use in how you use it. If you want to play like Slash, study his music.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
what helped me was just playing lead over backing tracks i made in guitar pro.

and to get out of the scale thing alot of people fall into, i practised making certain leaps and hearing which ones sounded pleasant.

weather its just on one string eg. |---5----10----13---|

or between strings eg,

|---------------------8---|
|-----------7--------------|
|--5------------------------|


finding out pleasant intervals, (dominants, octaves, and stuff) should help a fair bit in getting out of the rut of playing the scale.
hope i helped
#16
if you can't do scales that are more improved like slash do, read some theories about scales and how they really work,. Slash doesn't play one scale at a time, he changes them once in a while. Read some theories, it'll help.
Guilty as charge
Gear:
Ibanez RGT42BP (pimped)

Amp:
Ibanez Toneblaster 250

Other:
Tremolo from Boss
Footswitch to Toneblaster 250.
Korg AX3000G
#17
oh yeah, you're not broken.
Guilty as charge
Gear:
Ibanez RGT42BP (pimped)

Amp:
Ibanez Toneblaster 250

Other:
Tremolo from Boss
Footswitch to Toneblaster 250.
Korg AX3000G
#18
Improvising well comes with practice. Of course you can't play nearly as good as Slash when you start.
Quote by Kensai
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Women's rights.
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#19
You're broken! Inherit my Liiiifee! You're broken!!!!!!!


just had to :P
Gear:
2011 Fender American Standard Stratocaster
2012 Tanglewood TW170

Boss Katana 100w 1x112
Line 6 HD500
#20
Quote by wyldelife
You're broken! Inherit my Liiiifee! You're broken!!!!!!!


just had to :P

I was thinking the same thing

Anyway, learn solos and licks by your favorite guitarists, and incorporate their licks and phrases into your improvising. Take their patterns and develop your own based off of them. Continue to build this "lick library" and combine that with melodic phrases and you'll be a kickass improviser.
#21
This was how I got better about playing more melodically

1. Put on a drum beat with some sort of backing track at about 98bpm (or just play along to an iPod with a song at that tempo)
2. Solo over the music but play along SLOWLY. The fastest note you should play is a eighth note.
3. Just try to find sets of notes that fit well together. Explore!!
4. make sure to vary the notes a little more, like slide
5. Try recording yourself and try to get some really good slow lines going. Once your used to making up melodies on the fly, you can turn up the tempo a little bit, but not so much that you can't play along to it MELODICALLY!!