#1
I am an A-Level electronics student, and thought about making an octave pedal (a la digitech whammy, but with less features) for my coursework. I would want the circuit for my project to be able to output a signal an octave down, an octave up and two octaves up, and then either for, or after i have submitted this, make it into a pedal, with 2 outputs - wet and dry. I am aware that to have the signal and octave down I must half then frequency, and the the octave up, double it, and again for the 2 octaves up. Though I am just unsure of how this could be achieved. I will be doing R&D ideas shortly, though thought I'd ask here now as I was on the forums anyway. If anyone has any thoughts and would be willing to help me out I'd be extremely grateful, I'll post back in here with findings as well, to check I'm on the right track!

Cheers,
Hairball
Quote by TehJermie
you can get that toneblaster stack at the cost of your dignity.

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fine, screw the cheese sandwich if you must...


#3
yea, I know that, and feel im perfectly capable to do it, going through the theory with my electronics teacher I felt fine about it, just trying to gather as much info as I can on it at this stage, before I realy start working hard on it and find I've wasted weeks/months on something I can't do.
Quote by TehJermie
you can get that toneblaster stack at the cost of your dignity.

Quote by silhouettica
fine, screw the cheese sandwich if you must...


#4
You can do an analog octave as well, here's a rather simple octave up circuit:

There are other, more refined octave circuits, but just as an example/suggestion that it can be done via analog, and maybe should, if you've ever heard the difference.