#1
i was wondering what the tone differences are between series and parallel wiring. right now my pickups are in series. i bypassed my 2 tone knobs and i'm most likely going to wire the neck pickup to a coil-splitter switch, which i imagine will make my neck pickup a little punchier, like a regular single-coil pickup. and i was also wondering about the tone difference with a phase switch (when both neck and bridge pickups are active).
thanks for the help
Last edited by sethp at Jan 29, 2008,
#2
Phase-switching is like the high peak of a phaser. A bit harsh, but a very different sound and probably has a use. Parallel turns your two HBs into a huge 4-coil pickup, which gives you nice, fat tones, probably good for cleans and thick rhythm tracks.
#3
^I have no idea what you're even saying. Chances are, it's probably wrong, like usual.


Out of phase - this gives you a nasal, thinner kind of tone. I recommend doing it to pickups that are far away, like putting a neck pickp out of phase with a bridge pickup. I would never put a humbucker out of phase with itself. You see, as you move two out of phase pickups closer to each other, they cancel out more frequencies. So a humbucker out of phase with itself would be very weak and not very useful. I recommend this over a coil split 90% of the time.

Series wiring, as you know if how a humbucker is normally wired.

Parallel wiring is how the pickups in the the middle position on most guitars (The exception being Brian May's, I guess...) are wired. When referred to in terms of a humbucker's coils being wired in parallel, the humbucker drops about 30% in output - which sounds like a lot, but the result is different than a volume drop. Your tone cleans up, if you're on a OD channel, and it gets brighter LIKE a single coil. However, unlike a coil split, it still sounds full, and is still hum canceling. Much more useful.
#4
Quote by qotsa1998
Phase-switching is like the high peak of a phaser. A bit harsh, but a very different sound and probably has a use. Parallel turns your two HBs into a huge 4-coil pickup, which gives you nice, fat tones, probably good for cleans and thick rhythm tracks.

u can actually have any two coils in parallel. and that gives you a thinner quacky tone. series is fatter with more output.

out of phased coils on a single humbucker is said to be useless. thin and trebly with not much use.
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#5
i was refering to an "out-of-phase" switch when both the neck and the bridge 'buckers are on. obviously a 'bucker can't be out of phase with itself. but maybe that mod is kind of useless.
so would a parallel switch for the neck pickup be a better option that a splitter switch? maybe if it results in a loss of volume, i could install an on-board booster switch for it. maybe i'll try the parallel switch for now, instead of the coil-splitter
#6
Get a Push-Pull pot (unless you want to drill another hole in your guitar).
You use it in place of your tone pot (you can use it in your volume pot to I think).

Heres a list of various wiring diagrams for damn near any configuration you can think of:
http://www.seymourduncan.com/support/wiring-diagrams/

Push-Pull pots can be found here (among other places) :
http://store.guitarfetish.com/guelco.html
#7
Quote by sethp
obviously a 'bucker can't be out of phase with itself. but maybe that mod is kind of useless.

Actually it can be. You just set the the coils out of phase with each other.

Quote by sethp
i was refering to an "out-of-phase" switch when both the neck and the bridge 'buckers are on.

Right...My post addressed that.

Quote by sethp
but maybe that mod is kind of useless.

Depends. Brian May and Peter Green love it.

Quote by sethp
an't be out of phase with itself. but maybe that mod is kind of useless.
so would a parallel switch for the neck pickup be a better option that a splitter switch? maybe if it results in a loss of volume, i could install an on-board booster switch for it. maybe i'll try the parallel switch for now, instead of the coil-splitter

I'm telling you, it's not really a volume loss. It cleans up your tone by dropping your output.
Go to guitarelectronics.com for diagrams.