#1
Got a bit of a problem. My lead pickup(neck) is fine when I play, but when I switch to use both pickups I get a very annoying crackleing in my amp and if I go to rhytme(bridge) then I get this very quick almost non distorted tone. Before the rhytme pickup had a very nice distortion, very deep/fat sounding lows.

Anyhow without that pickup I can't get most of the sounds I usually play with and i'm a lil annoyed. Anyhow, is there a way to fix the pickup? or should I shell out the cash for a new one like I had and have someone install it for me? I am NOT confortable messing with anything in my guitar.

Thanks in advance.
#3
Quote by forsaknazrael
Still using that Invader? I'd say trade it in, get a good pickup.



What would you suggest then? I loved the tone of the Invader, but then again I haven't played a lot of other guitars.
#4
it's probably in the wiring or the pot's
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Epi PR5-e
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#5
Well, in all honestly, I think you should upgrade your amp first.

But since your bridge pickup is terrible, and doesn't even work right now...
I dunno, you could just bring it in to a shop and get it fixed. It's very likely and almost assuredly just a bad wiring job. Pickups don't break very easily. Evidence? Pickups from the 60's are still going strong.

You could also learn how to do it yourself. It's not hard at all.
#6
Quote by forsaknazrael
Well, in all honestly, I think you should upgrade your amp first.

But since your bridge pickup is terrible, and doesn't even work right now...
I dunno, you could just bring it in to a shop and get it fixed. It's very likely and almost assuredly just a bad wiring job. Pickups don't break very easily. Evidence? Pickups from the 60's are still going strong.

You could also learn how to do it yourself. It's not hard at all.



No thanks, I don't fix things, I only break lol.

It might have been a bad wiring job, but why go out now? I got this guitar used and the invader was already in it meaning the previous owner put it there and sold the guitar sometime after. I have had it for like 2-3 years, why would it just now go out?
#7
Cold solder joint. Cold solder joints are just plain unreliable.

Are you sure you don't want to try fixing it? It is NOT hard at all.

Soldering iron + solder + desoldering braid - less than 20 bucks

Maybe you'd need a multimeter, just to check if it's actually broken. - 10 bucks, if you buy it from the right place.
#8
Quote by forsaknazrael
Cold solder joint. Cold solder joints are just plain unreliable.

Are you sure you don't want to try fixing it? It is NOT hard at all.

Soldering iron + solder + desoldering braid - less than 20 bucks

Maybe you'd need a multimeter, just to check if it's actually broken. - 10 bucks, if you buy it from the right place.


I don't like fixing things myself, how much would it cost at a shop? 30 dollars?

Where shall I get a multimeter?
#10
Quote by forsaknazrael
Radioshack would have some, but they overcharge. I don't know, any other local electronics shop? Maybe even home depot?

Ask your dad if he has one, if he's a DIY kinda guy.


A shop can charge anywhere from 30-90 bucks, really. It depends.



Ouch, that hurts.

So, I got to get ahold of one of those then I assume there are instructions online on how to use it?
#11
If you are serious about not doing it yourself, find a friend who will do it for free or cheap. If you can't get perfect wiring for under $20, then find someone who is more into it.

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#12
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Ouch, that hurts.

So, I got to get ahold of one of those then I assume there are instructions online on how to use it?

A multimeter? Well, even then you'd have to desolder the pickup leads. Desolder the pickup leads from the guitar's wiring, and place one multimeter probe on one of the wire (there should be...black and green. the red and white would be soldered and taped off together.) and place the other probe on the other wire.
Oh, and the multimeter has to be set to like 20k. Well, that's the setting it has on mine, anyway. Yours might say aomething like kilo-ohms, or ohms, or something like that. If it reads anywhere near 16-17K, then the pickup is fine.
Last edited by forsaknazrael at Jan 29, 2008,
#13
Quote by jthm_guitarist
If you are serious about not doing it yourself, find a friend who will do it for free or cheap. If you can't get perfect wiring for under $20, then find someone who is more into it.


Finding someone may be the problem. I live in a relativly small town, also I don't really trust a stranger that says oh yah I'll do it for $20 either.
#18
Maybe I can find one of the guys I met once or twice at a guitar shop and see if he can do it for a lower amount.
#19
I'm thinking either cold solder joint finally broke or the switch is bad. Take it to a shop, get it done right, probably $30-40. I do my own, that way I know I got a good solder joint and it will last, and if it fails later on, I can fix it again.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#21
Oh yeah what type of switch is it? Cause the one on my epi is good for moving fast but I had to bend the little metal things on the inside so it made contact, i shud prolly get a new one..
#23
coils will not burn out. there's no heat doing through it. and the electric current generated by the pickup coils are very low it will not burn anything out.

from vibrations, coil might break. but that is very unlikely. the possibility is pretty much negligible.
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