#1
- My pinky/the smallest finger ( ) on my left hand is stiff as ****, and has been since I was a kid as far as I know. Using it while playing is, in general, a bitch. My teacher, however, claims that you just have to get used to it. What do I do to fix this as fast as possible?

- When playing scales up and down on the fretboard, I am supposed to hold my thumb still while only moving my fingers (and adjuting the position of the hand if possible). If I try to do this, I can only barely make it at a retardedly slow speed, should I continue doing it and expect to get used to it (muscle memory?)? And does this apply to the casual position as well, or just for the classical one?

#2
Try playing this with just your ring finger and pinky:
E|---------------------------3-4--|
B|----------------------3-4-------|
G|-----------------3-4------------|
D|------------3-4-----------------|
A|-------3-4----------------------|
E|--3-4---------------------------|


For your second question: Pretty much. I don't move my thumb when playing scales.
#3
play the intro to crazy train slowly and then build your speed. you'll feel the change fast
Quote by Deadmen
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Jump out with your wiener just hanging there and yell "Surprise!"
They'll never talk to you again, also make shure to helicoptor it a bit.



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#4
answer to question 1- i think everybody's gone through that stage of stiffness. practising with your pinky everyday should do the trick.

question 2- practise should help on the speed& you always hold your thumb down on the neck.

hope that helps
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#5
Quote by Wiegraf
Try playing this with just your ring finger and pinky:
E|---------------------------3-4--|
B|----------------------3-4-------|
G|-----------------3-4------------|
D|------------3-4-----------------|
A|-------3-4----------------------|
E|--3-4---------------------------|


For your second question: Pretty much. I don't move my thumb when playing scales.

That made me think of something else - is it possible to make the ring finger/pinky independent from the other, or are they connected to the same joint or something? 'Cuz I can't move my pinky without having the ring finger following along. :S

The thing is that I move my thumb (and sometimes, my hand) along with my fingers when playing scales, and haven't got a clue on how to fix it.
#6
+1
also go up and down the strings between the first and 5th fret using your index on the first fret and pinky on the fifth. It's a work out.
Out here you've gotta know where your towel is!
#7
no, your middle finger and ring finger are on the same muscle, your pinky is independant it just needs to be used to build up the muscle
Out here you've gotta know where your towel is!
#8
Quote by -Vogel-
That made me think of something else - is it possible to make the ring finger/pinky independent from the other, or are they connected to the same joint or something? 'Cuz I can't move my pinky without having the ring finger following along. :S

Yeah, it's definitely possible.

The thing is that I move my thumb (and sometimes, my hand) along with my fingers when playing scales, and haven't got a clue on how to fix it.

I'm not entirely sure what you're saying, but it doesn't sound like you're doing something wrong. Whatever feels comfortable for you, I guess.
#9
Quote by finalzz
answer to question 1- i think everybody's gone through that stage of stiffness. practising with your pinky everyday should do the trick.

question 2- practise should help on the speed& you always hold your thumb down on the neck.

hope that helps

Thanks to you (and the previous poster) for fast answes

So the causal position shouldn't be used for scales, only for chords and minor thingies (the reason I say "minor thingies" is because I feel that my teacher is teaching me how to shred or something similar, I've never used the classical position in three years of playing - songs without shred solos, that is -)?

I guess I'll just have to start on a ****tarded creepingly slow speed and build up over time, **** .
#10
Quote by Wiegraf
Yeah, it's definitely possible.


I'm not entirely sure what you're saying, but it doesn't sound like you're doing something wrong. Whatever feels comfortable for you, I guess.



Am I making sense now?

Basically, it looks retarded and is wrong .

EDIT: I forgot to draw the fingers on the last pic, they're supposed to be playing the lowest/thinnest strings there (= when I play on those strings, while trying to maintain classical position, everything ****s up big time)
#11
The second and third drawing have nothing to do with "classical position". Your picture is kinda like this: "Red, red, red"

The classical hand position is thumb behind neck, at approximately the same place where your middle finger is. The reason this works so well for classical players is because they actually play guitar in a pose that makes sense ergonomically:



The reason it doesn't work for you is probably because of your posture. Try sitting like a classical player, you will notice how easy it is to stay relaxed.

The "thumb over neck" grip (aka monkey grip, blues grip, et al.) is considered to be the preferred grip when it comes to bending and vibrato. This is because the best bends are achieved by using the muscles in your arm/wrist, as opposed to the fingers' muscles. For everything else, I keep my thumb behind the neck.