#1
I don't know if I'm the only one like this, but I tend to learn something better when I know what the end result is, thus giving me more of a goal, rather than a seemingly endless path.

Modes are one subject of theory I am still uninformed in. I've read through several lessons, tutorials, and what-nots about modes, and while I kind of understand what they are, I still fail to see the point of them. As far as I know, with sufficient knowledge of chords and scales (and actual playing skill), you can do pretty much anything.

So my main point is this:

When I learn how to use modes, what is it that I will be able to do (or do better) that I was unable to do before?
#3
Quote by subopolois
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Of course! Why didn't I think of that? I'm such an idiot.
#4
I am learning the modes as well...so here we go.

the modes take a scale and shift the root note up or down within a scale's key signature, and without changing any notes from the initial scale.

CDEFGABC is the C Major scale (Ionian mode)
DEFGABCD is the D Dorian mode etc.

in doing this, you change the sound of the scale while keeping the same notes. so you are getting another set of scales to use, each with distinct sounds.

if you need to know anymore...feel free to ask.
#6
Quote by Shackiddy
I am learning the modes as well...so here we go.

the modes take a scale and shift the root note up or down within a scale's key signature, and without changing any notes from the initial scale.

CDEFGABC is the C Major scale (Ionian mode)
DEFGABCD is the D Dorian mode etc.

in doing this, you change the sound of the scale while keeping the same notes. so you are getting another set of scales to use, each with distinct sounds.

if you need to know anymore...feel free to ask.


IMO, this is the wrong way to do it. I know there is no "right" or "wrong" when it comes to opinions, but that way shows off much less than this way:

Learn the modes all in relation to a certain root not, not a moving root note.

For example, Learn C Ionian, C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Lydian, C Mixolydian C Aeolian and C Locrian. That way, you will actually be able to hear the different sounds that they make, as the qualities of the modes played before it will not linger.

Also, that way you will learn to put them in order based on the feelings they convey, from Lydian (light, airy) to Locrian (really dark and creepy). Then, from that, you will be able to figure out how to switch between modes over ambiguous, power chord-type rhythm parts. If a rhythm only plays a certain number of notes, such as the root, major second, fourth fifth and minor seventh, you could switch between Mixolyidan, Dorian and Aeolian, thus making it progressively darker.

Learning them this way will really show you how they work together, and it also ties in key signatures and their relations to eachother.
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#7
Modes are just different scales, just like the major and the minor scale. You can use them to give different moods to songs, like you know how the major scales sounds happy and the minor scale sounds sad? Well modes can give you different moods too, for example the locrian mode will give you a dissonant sound, which sound sort of creepy, the Dorian mode will give you a sad sound to similar to the typical minor scale but still sounds different. Try playing a basic progression, something like I-IV-V7 in different modes to sort of get their individual sound.
#8
Quote by seedmole
IMO, this is the wrong way to do it. I know there is no "right" or "wrong" when it comes to opinions, but that way shows off much less than this way:

Learn the modes all in relation to a certain root not, not a moving root note.

For example, Learn C Ionian, C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Lydian, C Mixolydian C Aeolian and C Locrian. That way, you will actually be able to hear the different sounds that they make, as the qualities of the modes played before it will not linger.

Also, that way you will learn to put them in order based on the feelings they convey, from Lydian (light, airy) to Locrian (really dark and creepy). Then, from that, you will be able to figure out how to switch between modes over ambiguous, power chord-type rhythm parts. If a rhythm only plays a certain number of notes, such as the root, major second, fourth fifth and minor seventh, you could switch between Mixolyidan, Dorian and Aeolian, thus making it progressively darker.

Learning them this way will really show you how they work together, and it also ties in key signatures and their relations to eachother.



I agree that there is no right or wrong way. I tried learning the modes that way...long story short I felt confused. All of the different modes starting on C would run together and I would lose track of which mode I was doing. But once I did it like I mentioned, which is why I mentioned it, things came into perspective. I began to hear the differences between them, and I began to se the subtle differences between them.

And by the way, what you about putting modes to use, that was excellent. It makes total sense, not that what you said about learning modes didn't make sense. It's more of I tried your way and it didn't work for me, so I found a different way; not to intentionally knock you or anything.
#9
Most of what you guys said is the kind of stuff I already knew. Stuff along the lines of learning about modes.

What I want to know is how do I use modes to make my playing better? I mean, as of right now, I kind of feel like some kid who can write grammatically correct complete sentences, but now someone is trying to teach me what a noun and a verb is and I fail to see how it will make my sentences any better.
#10
Quote by Shackiddy
I am learning the modes as well...so here we go.

the modes take a scale and shift the root note up or down within a scale's key signature, and without changing any notes from the initial scale.

CDEFGABC is the C Major scale (Ionian mode)
DEFGABCD is the D Dorian mode etc.

in doing this, you change the sound of the scale while keeping the same notes. so you are getting another set of scales to use, each with distinct sounds.

if you need to know anymore...feel free to ask.


Thats only one way of finding a mode. You are just extracting the mode from the exact same fingering. There are ways to do it in which you start on the same root note and just use a fingering based on the Degree of the mode. I've just started getting into this but i'm pretty sure what i just said is right

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#11
Quote by seedmole
IMO, this is the wrong way to do it. I know there is no "right" or "wrong" when it comes to opinions, but that way shows off much less than this way:

Learn the modes all in relation to a certain root not, not a moving root note.

For example, Learn C Ionian, C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Lydian, C Mixolydian C Aeolian and C Locrian. That way, you will actually be able to hear the different sounds that they make, as the qualities of the modes played before it will not linger.

Also, that way you will learn to put them in order based on the feelings they convey, from Lydian (light, airy) to Locrian (really dark and creepy). Then, from that, you will be able to figure out how to switch between modes over ambiguous, power chord-type rhythm parts. If a rhythm only plays a certain number of notes, such as the root, major second, fourth fifth and minor seventh, you could switch between Mixolyidan, Dorian and Aeolian, thus making it progressively darker.

Learning them this way will really show you how they work together, and it also ties in key signatures and their relations to each other.


I personally agree with this, it allows you to get a feel for the mood each mode generates much more easily, especially if you go playing one mode after another, if you do that in the sort of C ionian, D dorian etc... way you'll only hear C major and never get an idea of what each mode can be used for.
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#12
Modes are scales. Like any scale, they exist because they have a unique flavor compared with other scales and sound different and interesting compared to standard major scales.